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Brilliant Watercolor Theorem, Mary Scott, August 20, 1821. Likely by the Same Hand as another at COLONIAL WILLIAMSBURG......SOLD

New England, likely Conway, Massachusetts, based on the history of the Colonial Williamsburg painting. Paint/watercolor on wove paper. Unusually delicately rendered bouquet of flowers with a light and airy presence, the still strong color palette features oranges, indigo blue, red, mustard, and greens. Note the stylized design of the base. The sawtooth border is a rare feature, also found on the Colonial Williamsburg example. Excellent condition with just a barely perceptible short tear. The 14 1/4 inch square dark-brown painted frame (and wavy glass} is period and likely original. The design, as per Colonial Williamsburg, is "reminiscent of overmantel decorations found in Massachusetts wall stenciling of the early nineteenth century." See AMERICAN FOLK PAINTING, Paintings and Drawings Other Than Portraits from the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Center, Colonial Williamsburg, Beatrix Rumford, figure 113, for reference. Bright colorful paintings like this, created in the early 19th century, were an expression of optimism and happiness in American's new country coming out of the darkness and extreme hardships endured during of the 18th century and the Revolution. A treasure worthy of a museum or home seeking the exceptional.

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IMPORTANT HISTORIC ANTIQUE SIGNBOARD. PATRIOTIC EAGLE AND SHIELD. SYMBOLS OF AMERICA

AMONG THE FINEST OF PATRIOTIC IMAGES KNOWN. Masterpiece folk art interpretation of the Great Seal of the United States of America centering rare signage for a US Marshal. Powerful. Dramatic. Confident. Inspiring. Brilliantly composed, rich with the visual vocabulary of America, like an illustrated time-capsule, revealing the deep pride and gratitude of early American's in their young country. Lansingburgh, New York, ca. 1853. Signed by the artist J. Follett. Painted on wood panel, for the appointment of John Mott as United States Marshall for the Northern District of NY State by U.S. President Franklin Pierce. The visual is glorious. The majestic eagle's talons firmly hold the bold red, white, and blue shield against his breast. E PLURIBUS UNUM is affirmed by his intense gaze as he supports the blue ribbon in his powerful beak. The roiling sun-filled clouds are a perfect backdrop to make the arrows (birth in warfare) and olive branches (hope for a prosperous, peaceful nation) stand out. Likewise, the gray-blue clouds, and dark wings contrast and frame the eagle's white head. The artist effectively rendered the US Marshal message, in gilt lettering against a sage ground, subordinate to and without competing with the eagle and shield. A thrilling signboard at the pinnacle of early American folk art. About 34 inches tall x 22 wide x 1/2 thick, with beveled edge. Condition: Unweathered as always presented indoors. Touch-up to scratches and lightly cleaned. .

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Rare Vinegar-Paint Decorated Antique Stand.....SALE PENDING

New England, likely Massachusetts, ca. 1820. Original paint on what appears to be maple, pine, and poplar. Paint decoration that is typically seen just on boxes,rare on a stand. Elegant successful proportions, with long, delicate, slender legs ending in tiny button feet. Well cared for in a very high state of originality. Brass pull is not the first yet is period and appropriate. About 30 1/2 inches tall. Top is about 22 x 19 inches. As described in Fales AMERICAN PAINTED FURNITURE, vinegar painting was accomplished by "walking" the second coat of paint over the ground color with a soft material like leather or sponge. Vinegar was used in the overcoat, as it dried the linseed oil in the putty caused a separation in the darker glaze producing unusual patterns. A very sweet and appealing folk art rarity. It looks special in our living room, really elevates the area! .

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Brilliant American Flag Snuffbox.....SOLD

Northeast, ca. 1820. Paint on black-lacquered papier-mache. Reflecting the pride in early Americans in their young country. Possibly Hudson River school, perhaps representing an area near New York City. The patriotic meaning not in doubt, the flag boldly centering a harbor scene. Superb color and condition, the thin over-varnish finely crackled. About 2 7/8 inches diameter x ¾ thick. Special!

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Soulful. Distinctive. "Drapery Swag with Tassels" Paint Decorated Box.....SALE PENDING

This is for the collector who looks for the "art" in antiques, loves dry authentic surfaces, and appreciates how the surface tells the story of how it was used and how it has witnessed history. New England, ca. 1825, in a superior dry original surface. The blue Swag and Tassels front-panel decoration is rare for a painted wooden box, more often seen above and flanking portraits of the period. It effectively shows from across a room even in low light against the soft, patinated buff-colored painted ground, enhanced by starbursts and vines, and by cherubs on each end panel. The domed top shows traces of the initials of the owner and holes from a long-gone bale handle. One of the most special boxes oI have had. Real and honest and quiet and comforting, it is the essence of what is desirable in an exceptional antique. Measures about 14 ½ inches long x 6 high x 7 ½ deep. Provenance upon request. High resolution photos easily emailed.

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One of the Finest Surviving Early American Volunteer Militia Knapsacks. Published. Best Provenance.....SOLD

Massachusetts, ca. 1800-1825. Original paint on hand-stitched canvas, with what appears to be linen backcloth. The brick-red painted canvas flap inscribed LIBERTY against a blue ground bordered in mustard, surmounted by 13 white stars representing the original colonies. The lower body with the script initials "MM" (likely for the Massachusetts Militia) within a vibrant mustard oval. The entire with black border. Remarkably the original leather straps and canvas shoulder straps are intact and without compromise! About 13 1/4 inches square. Having great pride in their units, militias invested considerable attention on their appearance. Although typically wearing personal clothing (not uniforms) every accoutrement surface was carefully considered and put to a vote, as these objects and their decorations were a common identity. This knapsack with the notable LIBERTY and 13 stars speaks to the freshness of the memory Americans had with British rule such that liberty and patriotism were treasured and honored. Provenance: Roland B. Hammond (North Andover, MA), William H. Guthman (prominent scholar and dealer in historical and military Americana-Westport, CT). Literature: Illustrated and Discussed, The Magazine Antiques, July 1984, page 124, plate I; Decorated American Militia Equipment by William H. Guthman.

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Prior-Hamblin School Portrait of a Blue-Eyed Little Boy in Butterscotch Dress with Riding Crop.....SOLD

Attributed to STURTEVANT J. HAMBLIN (active 1837 to 1856) Portland, Maine or Boston, Massachusetts. Oil on board. Classic coveted folk art portrait with flat rendering employing minimal modeling or shadowing, elevated considerably in rarity and desirability by the subject being a young child. Detailed patterned dress with lace collar. Basis for the attribution to Hamblin includes his characteristic long tapered fingers, the pattern of the collar, and lip shape which closes matches that of another Hamblin portrait in the National Gallery of Art. Well presented in a period red-grain painted frame. Frame size about 16 1/2 inches x 12 3/4. Condition is superb. See Sotheby's, January 21, 2007 and Skinners, June 11, 2000 for a remarkably similar portrait by Hamblin, probably this sitter's brother, in the same dress. Provenance: Private Northeast collection. VERY FAVORABLE PRICE ON REQUEST.

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Antique Scarce Authentic Pig Weathervane

Attributed to L. W. Cushing & Sons, Waltham, Massachusetts, authentic circa 1872-1900 (illustrated in Cushing catalogue 1883). Copper body and ears with verdigris surface. Cast zinc head with turned up nose, and curly tail. Diminutive size at just 17 inches length, height 11 inches. Superb surface. Far fewer pig weathervanes were made in the 19th century than eagles, horses, and cows, so relatively few authentic period examples survive today. The little size is especially desirable as it can be place anywhere. Excellent genuine period condition. Custom-made stand. References: ART OF THE WEATHERVANE, Steve Miller, pages 42-43 for a Cushing example of the same form; INCOLLECT/ANTIQUES AND FINE ART--American Furniture And Americana Shine at The 2015 Winter Antiques Show, David Schorsch and Eileen M. Smiles; FOLK ART MAGAZINE, Fall, 1998, page 12, ad for Christies, NY, January 1999 sale with a pig weathervane by the same maker as the lead item.....Provenance: Private New England collection..

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Bold, Bright, OUTSTANDING Theorem.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca. 1830-1840. Paint on velvet. Strong visual appeal, retaining brilliant, bright unfaded saturated colors and crisp, clean composition, the flowers bursting from the stylized basket with delightfully exaggerated in-curved sides, the basket resting on graduated steps simulating smoke decoration. Fancy theorems were painted in this period as gifts for friends or to brighten one's home, the still life often chosen as the subject as a symbol of abundance, and velvet for its soft appearance. Painstakingly rendered with exceptional skill by a talented artist. Period frame dimensions of about 22 3/4 inches wide x 21 tall. Remarkable condition; light toning. Provenance: Peter Tillou; private Northeast collection. Likely by the same hand as another that in the Chrysler Garbisch collection that sold at Sotheby's in 1974. Contact me for very favorable pricing.

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Shaker Four Finger Box in Rare MEETINGHOUSE BLUE Paint.....SALE PENDING

Maine (Sabbathday Lake or Alfred), ca. 1830. Original authentic and rare Meetinghouse Blue paint, making reference to the original blue paint on the interior woodwork of the Shaker meetinghouse at Sabbathday Lake, as illustrated in Amy Stechler Burns and Ken Burns, The Shakers, Hands to Work, Hearts to God (New York: Aperture Books, 1987), p. 109. Shaker religious laws stipulated that Meetinghouses "should be painted white without, and of a bluish shade within". About 11 3/4 inches long x 8 1/4 deep x 4 3/4 tall. Period wear as shown, including smooth burnishing (from frequent handling) about the edges; structurally excellent with just a minor ancient split underneath. Beautifully carved tapered and chamfered fingers.

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