Home  >  Antiques
Antiques
Remarkable Symbolic and Patriotic Mason's Engraved Horn Beaker with Handle.....SALE PENDING

America, ca. 1790-1830. Cow horn, brass, wood, and polychrome inks. May have been used for ladling, or perhaps a presentation piece. Profusely engraved with symbols of the freemasons, including the beehive (industriousness), thistles, sun and moon (opposites), VIDE AVDI TACE (know dare, and vow of silence/keep the secret), key (abstain from slander and defamation), rooster (faith, hope, charity) and many more. Below the "all seeing eye" are American flags supported by the bee skep, suggesting that America works hard for the benefit of all. Engraved over the surface of a large segment of cow horn, then filled with inks to provide contrast. The "beaker" is capped by a beautiful 3/4 inch tall BRASS collar with carved-toothed lower edge, note the strong patina to the brass. The collar is fitted with a ferrule that holds a hardwood turned handle, terminating with a brass finial. Stands about 5 inches tall, and including the handle is about 10 inches in length. Condition is superb. Happy to send hi res images.

More Information
Scarce Early Trade Sign

New England, ca. 1800-1820. Love this! Mustard and black paint on pine. Only the third lettered sign of this form and early period that I have owned. Pit-sawn back with picture frame molding attached by cut nails. Note the 'long S' in Dress-maker that transitioned to the "S" as we know it after ca. 1800. The comma after the name, and the period at the end of dressmaker are also early conventions. Note how BEAUTIFULLY formed and flowing the lettering was rendered, indicating a very skilled sign painter. Exceptional paint condition with expected craquelure. Structurally sound with inconsequential losses at lower left of the molding resulting from the nailing on of the original cut nails. Small size has flexibilty to be put most anywhere: About 32 inches wide x 13 1/2 tall by 2 at the molding. My other two signs of this form were from NH, this may be as well. Simple. Elegant. Soul-full.

More Information
Home-Spun Pot Holder WE'S FREE Celebrating the 13th Amendment

Northeast America, ca. 1865. This important historical "document" ironically in the form of a utilitarian potholder was likely crafted by a freed slave, or a Northern sympathizer, soon after President Lincoln signed a Joint Resolution submitting the 13th Amendment to the states in 1865. The imagery of the jubilant dancing couple symbolizes slaves coming together rather than being torn apart and sold. This imagery debuted in abolitionist antebellum times when the focus was on the potential of slave liberation rather than the harsh reality of slave's lives, and during the Civil War was employed by Union women on pot holders to sell and raise money for bandages, food and other supplies for Union troops. Pre-13th Amendment dancing-couple images were accompanied by the expression "Any holder but a slaveholder". We's Free reflects that key moment in history when the hope of being free was transformed into reality. What further elevates this little potholder to importance is that it was a personal, hand-made work, not a manufactured piece, and by the fabric wear, indicating that the pot holder was not just for celebration yet also lived with as a recurring spirit lifter. About 6 inches square. A double-sided framing would protect the fabric and enable viewing on both sides..

More Information
Pennsylvania Fraktur Dated 1805 'Samuel Moffly'

Dated 1805. Berks County, Pennsylvania. Watercolor on laid paper. Beautifully composed, colors remain bright and saturated. Information with the fraktur reads "These two married people, Mr. Joseph Moffly and his wife Elizabeth, ne'e Myer, is a son born named Samuel, in the year of our Lord Jesus 1789, the 8th of December at 8 o'clock in the evening in the sign of Virgo. This Samuel was born and baptised in America in the State of Pennsylvania, in Berks County in Retschland Township. Samuel was baptised the 4th of April, 1790 by Herrn Mack. The Witnesses were Johan Hofman and his wife AJnamargeta. Made by Samuel Moffly in 1805". Frame is not period. Frame size about 20 3/8 inches x 17 1/2. Sight size about 16 1/4 inches x 13 1/2. Condition very good with minor repairs. Crease lines unobtrusively visible from folding, yet it was likely being folded for generations that has enabled its colors to remain strong.

More Information
Diminutive Dome Top Paint Decorated Box by the Compass Artist

Lancaster County, PA, ca. 1800-1840. OF JUST THREE DOZEN DOME TOP BOXES ATTRIBUTED TO THE COMPASS ARTIST, THIS BOX IS THE SMALLEST AT UNDER FOUR INCHES. Poplar and perhaps pine. Dovetailed case. Tiny cut nails attach the base and hand-planed lid. Decorations laid out and scribed by compass before painting. Distinctive tinned sheet iron hinges, and punchwork-decorated escutcheon plate and fan-shaped hasp are characteristic of this maker and original. Painted with a Prussian blue ground, the scribe lines highlighted with white or red paint, inner petals filled with red, and outer lobes profusely stippled with red dots. About 3.75 inches high by 3.75 wide by 2.75 deep. Untouched condition. See The Compass Artist of Lancaster County Pennsylvania, Wendy Cooper et al., American Furniture, Beckerdite, 2009, pp 62-87 for an extensive discussion of Compass Boxes. Similar boxes are in Wintherthur and the Philadelphia Museum of Art and in some of the finest folk art collections.

More Information
Scarce Paint Decorated Cheese-Box Form Militia Canteen.....SOLD

New England, likely Massachusetts (Hingham area) or New Hampshire, ca. 1800-1825 (War of 1812 era). Appears to be pine top and bottom and perhaps ash as the band. Intaglio stamped JR, the maker, possibly for "John Ripley" a second generation cooper working in Hingham who used the stamp JR. Paint initialed "LP." which would likely represent the owner, or the town in which the militia was mustered. Original dry blue-green paint with beautifully contrasting red bursting star and border, and remarkably retains its carved red plug. The pride of being a member of the militia was so strong that these canteens were decoratively embellished to represent the militia in parades to accessorize their clothing and hats. Excellent, robust structural condition with the minor loss of two of the three leather sling loops, and a bit of wear on the highpoints of the hand-planing, on the signed side. About 7 1/8 inch diameter x 2 5/8 tall.

More Information
Recently Discovered Portrait by Joseph Goodhue Chandler.....SOLD

Hubbardston, MA. Signed by Jospeph Goodhue Chandler and dated 1850. Oil on canvas. Having never been out of the family of descendent's of the sitter until recently found in Western New York State. A BEAUTIFUL COMBINATION OF A MOST DESIRABLE SUBJECT BY A NOTED CHILD ARTIST IN A HIGH STATE OF ORIGINALITY......An itinerant painter who was born in Massachusetts, Joseph Chandler was a typical folk artist who traveled painting portraits, but unlike many, he signed and dated his paintings on the backs of the canvases. He was especially skilled with children. He favored a deep blue dress behind one hand that held flowers, the other hand often holding a pet or object, in this case the ribbon of the child's hat. As with many folk art paintings, the image would seem to depict Miss Mary older than her three years of age. Children's portraits by Chandler are in fine museum and private collections. In ink, on back of canvas: Painted for Mifs Mary S. Gardner aged 3 years.....By J G Chandler , May, 1850.....On the stretcher: Hubbardston, Mafs Minor restoration, original frame and stretcher. Note the use of the "long S" in Miss and Mass, an early writing convention that slowly fell out of use after 1800.

More Information
A GREAT RARITY IN EARLY AMERICAN LIGHTING

New England, ca. 1800. ONE-OF-A-KIND. SOULFUL. OF REMARKABLE FORM AND ORIGINALITY HAVING NOT BEEN ON THE MARKET IN AT LEAST 40 YEARS. Ash and pine. Wooden-peg and cut-nail joinery. Vent holes form the initials 'L' and 'M', likely for whom the lantern was made. The design has a compelling folk art presence with a whimsical sideward bias: two side walls vertical, the others angled toward them. Unified by a dry red-painted surface resulting from more than two centuries of handling and exposure. The character is augmented by thin, wavy glass with expected pronounced distortions, held in place by un-headed cut nails. A small leather-hinged door provides access to the interior, its diminutive opening limiting a smaller hand to pass through, perhaps that of the lady 'LM'. The leather hinges are remarkable in their own-right, well worn yet undisturbed, and encrusted with paint and grunge. The carved turnbuckle is also original. The door opens to the first wrought iron candle socket, which pierces the lantern bottom and is held in place by a wooden wedge. It is significant that the original socket remains, as many lanterns had it replaced due to deterioration from heat and from candles being pushed in and stubs pried out. It also suggests, combined with the presence of the first leather-hinges, that this lantern had limited use in period, probably not an everyday object but rather withheld for special times. Eye-catching verticality and presence as it stands about 15 1/2 inches tall not including the wire hanger; base dimensions about 6 inches x 6 1/2.....Comparable painted treen lanterns are exceedingly rare. See lot 264, Weld Collection, Skinner Auction, August 13, 2000 for comparison. For the advanced collector pursuing the best. .

More Information