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Historic Trade Sign with Rare Subject. A Treasure For Period House and Furniture Admirers.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca. 1800. This very desirable subject elevates this piece considerably. IMAGINE the woodwork and furniture discussed and produced by those passing under this sign. Single board with square nailed bold picture-frame molding. Dry, unvarnished original black lettering over patinated oyster-white, the lettering rendered by a professional painter. Note the early use of the "comma" after HOUSE, and the large "period" after WORK, punctuations seen on signage of this time. More skilled and precise than the "carpenter" (who built a home's structure), the "house-joiner" worked within the house, producing decorative moldings and trims, mantelpieces, window and door frames, and built-ins such as shelves and cabinets, while the cabinet maker referred to fine furniture. In excellent period condition with minor "checks" and old loss to just the facing of the end-moldings. The back-side was later over-painted (in the 19th century) with signage for Book Store and Medicines. It is likely that later usage and exposure of the books/medicines side protected that House Joiner/Cabinet side allowing it to survive....About 94 inches long x 13 3/4 tall x 2 3/8 deep (at the moldings). I see this sign as a treasure for the collector that honors the gifted craftsmen of 200-plus years ago that worked with their hands to produce furniture treasures and the interiors of the homes they were made for..

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Sweet Folk Art Hooked Rug Dog Portrait

American, ca. 1900. Love this! Wools and cottons with beautiful soft colors. The artist created a most pleasing, whimsical rendering of likely a cherished family pet. Each little fabric detail is from her mind, not a pattern. Petite size of just 31 1/4 inches long x 16 3/4 tall that can be placed most anywhere. Expertly mounted; easily hung. Superb condition. Happy to email high res photos.

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MASTERPIECE CARVED PINWHEEL BOWL. Among the finest and rarest of all Colonial bowls extant.....SOLD

Northeast America, ca. 1770-1810. Maple. Original natural surface with the best color one could hope for. Remarkable movement and energy owing to the fluidity and boldness of the convex pinwheel as it gracefully bends and swells from center to rim and around the three-dimensional geometry. Challenging to lay out let alone carve, this bowl was slow-lathe turned to the basic bowl shape, then the exterior made extraordinary by an imaginative, expert wood carver also capable in mathematics. Even most pinwheels on case pieces are much more restrained (flatter and more linear). Although pinwheels are seen on 17th/18th century furniture from the Carolinas to northern New England, this bowl was most likely made in Connecticut as the animated carving compares to the free-spirited fans and pinwheels of CT case pieces, especially from the circle of Samuel Loomis. Boston/Salem and Rhode Island also possible. Superior condition without apology. Out-of-round shrinkage to a subtle oval. Robust in hand. Complex patina from handling (it was really used). About 15 inches x 14 inches in diameter x 4 1/4 deep. Provenance: Private collection acquired long ago at a charity shop in or near Marshfield, Massachusetts. After extensive research this bowl appears to be without precedent; unparalleled; unique.

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Beautiful Colorful Folk Art Family Record with Vivid Graphics

Northeast America, New York State or Connecticut, ca. 1829. Watercolor and ink on wove paper. An exceptional example of multi-generational family documentation, possibly a "school-girl" work. Probably painted when Laura Roberts Foster (b. Feb. 22, 1808 in Patterson NY) and Joshua C Foster (b. Nov 11, 1805 in Southeast NY) were married on October 15, 1829. The towns of Patterson and Southeast (written on the record) are in New York State near Danbury, CT. A family record by the same hand came to market in the 1980's from Ridgefield, CT, just a few miles from Patterson/Southeast. What a remarkable way to document their wedding, with a neatly compartmentalized composition of masterful paint, pen, and compass work. Clearly articulated symbols of trees for births, hearts for marriage, and sandglass for death. Note the fine details like the tiny flowers within the half-round border at the top, flanked by large roses. Gilt frame is period and likely original. Frame size about 18 1/4 inches tall x 15 1/4 wide; sight size about 16 1/4 x 13 1/4. Retains crisp bright colors in superb condition. See "The Art of the Family" Genealogical Artifacts in New England, for reference. Enliven your home with color and authentic pieces. High res photos available.

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A LITTLE MASTERWORK(!!!) PORTRAIT OF A BABY BOY WITH RIDING CROP

New England, ca. 1845. One of the finest Prior-school portraits of this type known. Attributed to William Mathew Prior . Oil on board. The inviting warm color palette complemented by the striking, unique, paint decorated frame. The shape of the lips and eyes, and softness of the face are exceptional. The child centering colorful draped swags with rim lighting. Note red corals at each sleeve of the delicate, lace-trimmed dress, the coral typically worn by children as it was believed to ward off evil. He grasps a riding crop, a device sometimes held in portraits as they were a common gift for boys in this period. Even though way too young to ride a living horse or pony, he could saddle-up with his crop on his rocking horse. The paint decorated frame is a treasure on its own, yet combined with the portrait creates a singular presence. Overall frame size about 18 inches x 13 3/4. Exceptional condition. Provenance: Distinguished private collection for decades. A rare opportunity to acquire an iconic folk art image.

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Extremely Rare PAINT DECORATED Federal CHILD'S Chest.....SALE PENDING

An exquisitely PAINTED (not veneered) country piece emulating a fine city example. Make a statement in your home today as this little chest did some 200 years ago. Distinctive and authentic with a proud elegance owing to the sophisticated form and remarkable PAINT DECORATION created by a skilled designer, cabinet-maker, and artist. Just look at how beautifully the paint-decoration is rendered. New England, probably Southern Maine to Portsmouth NH to Salem, MA, ca. 1810-1820. Maple, basswood, and pine. Untouched including the original paint and surface, and undisturbed brass pulls. All four corners having crisply turned columns and legs with cookie-corner tops. The apron drop even retains its flaring spurs. So well cared for...in sensational condition with just minor blemishes. Proportionally perfect at about 22 inches wide x 22 tall x 11 deep.

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MINIATURE Lift Top Chest with Sophisticated Apron and Inner Folk Art Panels over Hidden Compartments. American "FANCY" Period.

Northeast America, ca. 1800 to 1825. From the AMERICAN FANCY PERIOD IN WHICH COLOR AND CREATIVITY AND IMAGINATION WERE SOUGHT TO DELIGHT THE HUMAN SPIRIT AND EXCITE THE SENSES. Pine and poplar, with untouched "sugary" varnish surface. Rich dark patina. Paint decorated with outer-case having black-over-red graining, flowers on the shaped and pierced apron and bracket feet, and red tulips on the front facade within a mustard reserve. The case conceals hidden compartments, one under a till above a decorated panel that slides up to reveal a tiny drawer. A hinged panel under the lid lifts to expose three compartments, the panel decorated on the outside with a folk art painting of a ship arriving at a wharf (note the woman and man in top hat at the window), the underside of the panel having another fanciful folk art painting of dogs pulling a chariot chased by a rider on stag. The remnant of a note includes the passage "May virtue and happiness." About 10 inches long x 7 3/4 tall x 5 1/4 deep. Provenance includes the "Tom and Carolyn Porter Collection" (Tom founder of Garths)..

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Folk Art Watercolor of Soldier and Horse, Sensational Blue Painted Frame

Northeast America, likely Pennsylvania, ca. 1830. Watercolor on wove-paper. Drawing mounted in-period on wove paper ground, probably to help smooth folded wrinkles. Early frame in robin's egg blue is just sensational. Frame size about 11 1/2 inches x 9 1/2. Provenance: Collection of Ted and Carol Hayward.

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SISTER'S BOND. Life-Size Double Portrait by Joseph Goodhue Chandler. 1848

Inscribed on the back: "Painted for Victoria A. and Virginia R. Wilder aged 6 years/by J.G. Chandler February 1848"..... Oil on canvas. The sisters portrayed wearing russet dresses and white pantaloons. Likely in the area of Hubbardston, Massachusetts. This portrait delightfully conveys the bond between the two sisters, embodied by their joined hands and shoulders forming a symbolic heart, in a manner that would be difficult to show as effectively even with the realism afforded by the then emerging availability of photography. And the color certainly could not have been matched by the monochromatic photographic images of the day. Note the sizeable house on the hill behind the girls, (likely their family home), the fishermen on the nearby pond, and the foreground flowers. Impactful scale! Sight size about 56 x 28 inches. Frame size about 66 tall x 39 wide. Paintings by Chandler are in many important antique and folk art collections, both private and institutional, the latter including the Shelburne Museum, the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Center, the New York State Historical Museum at Cooperstown, and the National Gallery of Art...... Provenance includes: Hirschl & Adler; Leigh Keno; pictured and discussed in the Highly Important Americana from the Stanley Paul Sax Collection, Sotheby's, January, 1998; prominent Midwest Collection.

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Basket in Beautiful Rich Blue Paint.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca. mid-19th century. Ash splint with fixed handle. Retains a vivid, deeply saturated, well-patinated dry blue paint. About 8 ¾ inches to the top of the handle, 8 inches long x 7 1/2 wide. Its all about the BLUE! Proveance: Private collection acquired about 30 years ago from David Schorsch.

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