Home  >  Antiques
Antiques
Signed, Engraved, Early American Tinder Pistol

Northeast America, ca. 18th century. Iron, with wooden handle that appears to be oak or chestnut. A flintlock tinder lighter, or tinder pistol, typically made by gunsmiths, was a device that saw use in wealthy households from the 18th century until the invention of reliable matches. It somewhat resembled a small flintlock pistol, but without a barrel and with a candle holder and with legs so it could be stood upright. When the trigger was pulled, the sparks from the frizzen lit dry tinder in the pan, from which the candle would be quickly lit. The device provided a quick and reliable source of light, and flame for the lighting of fires. Acanthus-leaf engraving to the top. Side storage door intaglio stamped with the maker's name "WOOD(s)". The database of American gun makers shows Wood and Woods that worked in Massachusetts, New York, and Pennsylvania in the period of this tinder lighter's making. Excellent untouched condition. About 6 5/8 inches long. The candle cup retains an early tallow candle. Provenance: Private collection; Hollis Brodrick.

More Information
RARE TOMBSTONE-DOOR WALL CUPBOARD EX: LILLIAN BLANKLEY COGAN

New England, ca. mid 18th century. A witness to the early days of Colonial America, highlighted by ancient original paint and rare STRIKING tombstone shaped door. The turnbuckle knob (which any lover of treen will notice for its sensational surface) opens the door revealing three shelves, one defined by the shaped round of the tombstone. The door is scratch-carved with a small B and large N. (18th century scrafitto from a child?) High state of originality with all original moldings, H-hinges with rosehead nails, and knob/turnbuckle. Wear related to age and use. A later nail added at the closure to compensate for wear. About 30 1/8 inches tall x 26 1/4 wide and delightfully shallow at only 7 1/2 inches deep not including the molding. May be mounted to a wall or rest on a chest. THE WHOLE LEAVES AN INDELIBLE IMAGE. Provenance: Private collection of the best of 18th century country America; Lillian Blankley Cogan (decades ago), a doyenne of Americana dealers for nearly 70 years.

More Information
Exceptional Sailor-Engraved Powder Horn

Probably Coastal New England, ca. early 19th century (possibly late 18th). Carved and engraved horn with pine plug. Profusely decorated with vignettes of places the sailor had seen (real or imagined) during his journeys. The horn is centered with the patriotic American eagle and shield, with E PLURIBUS UNUM trumpeted from the eagle's mouth within ribbon. Pictorial engravings include: grand three masted ship (likely the ship the carver sailed on for months or years), mariner's compass, NAPTUN, a trumpeter riding a half horse/fish, conjoined hearts, a magnificent estate with fish weathervane and musketed guards, table fitted with food and wine, a hunter, and more. Overall length about 12 inches. Excellent condition.

More Information
Post AMERICAN REVOLUTION Illuminated Manuscript

Likely Massachusetts, dated 1790, signed "Rhoderick Morley". Watercolor and ink on laid paper. Found years ago in an early desk with family papers in Massachusetts. Beautifully illustrated, likely school-boy created, with one well dressed gentleman firing a flintlock pistol, the other brandishing a sword, flanking multiple phrases possibly connected to healing political or social divisions still strong due to the Revolution and suggesting how one should live and act. One expression prominently at the top center "Let union and peace make discord cease" not only would seem to relate to the recently ended Revolutionary War, it is also an expression that was used by the Mayflower Society. Another phrase: "The wicked they must be dealt with in a more severe manner" might explain the sword and pistol. Paper size 14 3/8 x 11 3/4 inches. Frame size about 18 3/4 x 16 1/4. Condition strong with unobtrusive folds and minor losses..

More Information
Dramatic Seascape by Jurgan Huge

Probably coastal New England, ca. 1870's. Oil on canvas. Attributed to Jurgan Frederick Huge (1809-1878). Huge was born in Hamburg yet by 1830 was a store owner in Bridgeport, CT. He was noted for ship paintings while incorporating vignettes of people and carriages, fanciful castles, and other fine details. This work boldly portrays a ship at risk on the rocks, watched closely by a couple standing precariously on the cliff, with more people/carriages/horses further within the scene. In sensational condition, housed in an early ripple gilded frame. The vertical format with frame dimensions of about 25 inches wide x 32 tall works well to decorate challenging narrow wall spaces. For reference: See Young America, A Folk Art History. Lipman/Warren/Bishop for good information about Huge including the cover painting. Provenance: Private collection; The Hill Gallery at the Philadelphia Antique Show, 2001.

More Information
SUPERIOR EXAMPLE: Early Lighting Stand. Original surface. Published. Ex-Museum......SOLD

New England, 18th century, 1740-1780. Mixed woods which appear to be maple, cherry, and mahogany with original rich, deep surface and color. Threaded post with adjustable chip-carved rail fitted with original iron candle holders above a scarce medial "table", perhaps to hold extra candles, wick trimmers, etc. All supported by a plinth with tripod raking legs. The carved screw mechanism allowed candles, and medial table, to be raised and lowered to just the right height to optimize precious candle light. In a very high state of originality. The screw mechanism continues to work smoothly. The underside of the medial table is beautifully tooled (see close up photo of its underside). About 32 inches total height. Ex-WADSWORTH ATHENEUM, Hartford (accession number painted on 26.522). PICTURED IN WALLACE NUTTING,1928, plate 1359. Provenance: Private New England collection; Hollis Broderick.

More Information
Folk Art Watercolor of Little Girl Gathering Flowers

Northeast America, ca 1825-1850. Watercolor on woven paper. Brilliant, saturated colors. The artist rendered the scene in painstaking detail, filled with thousands of tiny little brush-strokes. The young child collects blue flowers along a stream in her gathering basket, likely to enliven the tiny house in the background, or perhaps for a larger home implied by the sturdy gate. A peaceful yet unusually bold colorful image. The gilt frame (with dusting wear at the bottom) may be original. Overall frame size about 20 inches x 16 5/8.

More Information
Scarce Blacksmith and Carriage Maker Painting

Probably Connecticut, ca. 1870-1880. Oil on canvas. The proud owners/workers standing before the Shea and McCarthy Blacksmithing and Jobbing Shop joined with the C.S. Gamwell Carriage Shop. As with most folk art paintings of PRIDE in town or business, the artist has depicted an idealistic view, with no disrepair or debris, and has effectively used rich primary colors of blue in the sky with puffy white clouds contrasted against the reds of the clothing and carriages. The scene shows workers with tools; the blacksmith with leather apron. Of note is the ramp alongside the carriage shop which would allow carriages or wagons to be pulled to the second level for repair, perhaps providing access to the undersides. Excellent condition, cleaned with minor retouch. Original stretcher and likely original frame. Unlined except for tack-edges. Sight size about 30 inches x 22. Overall frame size about 34 x 27.

More Information
Scarce and Exceptional Pictorial Trade Sign, Dealer in Cattle

American, Westminster, Maryland. 19th century. Double-sided, with original COMPLETELY UNTOUCHED dry, paint decorated surface on wooden board with sturdy, chamfered wooden molding. Iron hanging brackets. Signed "S.V. Bankert". This sign is a folk art treasure, exhibiting a vibrant image with appealing subtleties of color and detail, and elevated considerably in character by a marvelous surface that only generations of exposure can create. From a considerable distance it communicated the business it represented without the need of lettering. As with most double-sided signs, one side is more worn than the other, this with the back bearing marks from buckshot, the impact of which would have caused the sign to swing wildly from its brackets..... S.V. Bankert was not only the sign's artist, yet also likely a close relation to the cattle dealer's owner. It was originally discovered at the Bankert family sale in Carroll County, Westminster, MD. An 1880 census from Carroll County lists: Adam Bankert, age 34. Occupation: "Dealer in Cattle". And also Samuel V. Bankert, age 40 and his wife, age 29 who had occupation listed as "furniture store". Dimensions: 23 1/2 inches tall (29 inches with brackets) by 41 3/4 wide. Pictured under indoor halogen art light AND also outdoors in early morning natural light. EASY TO EMAIL HIGH RES IMAGES, JUST ASK.

More Information
Rare Early Cooper-Made Treen MINIATURE Firkin.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca. late 18th/early 19th century. STAVED pine side-wall held by surrounding wood straps with tiny button-hook joinery. Carved top and bottoms, the bottom chamfered to fit within a side dado groove. Deep original red paint, very dry and dark on the lid, the darkness owing to particulates in the air from the hearth landing on its surface. The underside much brighter as it was protected. The sidewalls retain a very thin crackly over-varnish. A small inner label reads: AE62 . 2ui . -NFS-. My interpretation is that this was in a dealer's collection (not for sale), the dealer had the initials 'A.E.', and bought it in 1962. No idea what the 2ui is. This piece was not a whimsy, rather shows evidence of use, perhaps as a portable butter-tub. Just 2 7/8 inches tall x 2 5/8 diameter at the lid, tapering to 2 3/8 at the base. Terrific condition with just a small loss as shown that is hidden under the lid. Real early American painted treen.

More Information