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IMPORTANT Paint Decorated Box from the Remarkable Katcher Collection.....SOLD

Pennsylvania, ca. 1800-1810. White pine, with original tinplated sheet-iron hasp and hinges. Joined by unheaded cut nails and hide glue. Known as a "Bucher" box based on an example signed by H. (Heinrich) Bucher at Winterthur. It is now known that Bucher was an owner, not the maker, the maker being active in Lancaster, Lebanon, or Berks County from 1760 to 1810. This is the only known Bucher box with four initials, which probably represent the first and last names of the husband and wife for whom the box was made. It is elaborately decorated with the original red, yellow, white, and green tulip blossoms on a black ground with sawtooth border. Provenance: Hattie Brunner, Reinholds, PA, 1961; Sotheby's, May, 1995, the Important Americana Collection of Dr. and Mrs. Henry Deyerle, Harrisonburg, Charlottesville, VA; Jane Katcher. Pictured and discussed in EXPRESSIONS OF INNOCENCE AND ELOQUENCE, Selections from the Jane Katcher Collection of Americana, Volume 1, page 286 and 402. Excellent condition. About 9 5/8 inches wide x 8 5/8 deep x 2 1/4 tall. .

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Stunning Folk Art Watercolor Painting of the First Battle of Bull Run (Manassas)

Northern States, ca. last quarter, 19th century. Watercolor on paper. HIGHER RESOLUTION PHOTOS EASILY EMAILED. Clearly inspired by the steel engraving of The First Battle of Bull Run, 21st July 1861, by noted artist John C. McRae of New York City. The battle was fought in Prince William County, Virginia, near the city of Manassas, not far from Washington, D.C. It was the first major battle of the American Civil War and a Confederate victory over the then poorly trained Union troops. This watercolor painting is an extraordinary interpretation of the monochromatic McRae engraving with vivid, brilliant colors by an unknown artist skilled in the use of watercolors and deeply motivated to bring the engraving to vibrant life, giving the work folk art appeal in addition to its historical significance. Pencil inscribed on the back "First Battle of Bull Run" No 95 (unknown what the 95 refers to, as this artwork is an original watercolor, not a print). Colors are saturated and unfaded. Paper condition is excellent with minor professional restoration about the edges. Frame size about 32 inches wide x 23 tall. Sight size about 27 inches x 17 3/4.

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Diminutive Dome Top Paint Decorated Box by the Compass Artist

Lancaster County, PA, ca. 1800-1840. OF JUST THREE DOZEN DOME TOP BOXES ATTRIBUTED TO THE COMPASS ARTIST, THIS BOX IS THE SMALLEST AT UNDER FOUR INCHES. Poplar and perhaps pine. Dovetailed case. Tiny cut nails attach the base and hand-planed lid. Decorations laid out and scribed by compass before painting. Distinctive tinned sheet iron hinges, and punchwork-decorated escutcheon plate and fan-shaped hasp are characteristic of this maker and original. Painted with a Prussian blue ground, the scribe lines highlighted with white or red paint, inner petals filled with red, and outer lobes profusely stippled with red dots. About 3.75 inches high by 3.75 wide by 2.75 deep. Untouched condition. See The Compass Artist of Lancaster County Pennsylvania, Wendy Cooper et al., American Furniture, Beckerdite, 2009, pp 62-87 for an extensive discussion of Compass Boxes. Similar boxes are in Wintherthur and the Philadelphia Museum of Art and in some of the finest folk art collections.

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Small Dometop Document "Bucher" Box.....SOLD

Pennsylvania, ca. 1800-1810. White pine, with original tinplated sheet-iron hasp and hinges. Joined by unheaded cut nails and hide glue. Dry, patinated, untouched surface with normal wear from period use. Known as a "Bucher" box based on an example signed by H. (Heinrich) Bucher at Winterthur. It is now known that Bucher was an owner, not the maker, the maker being active in Lancaster, Lebanon, or Berks County from 1760 to 1810. Elaborately decorated with red, yellow, white, and green flower blossoms, the ends particularly decorative with single flowers filling the spaces. Structurally excellent condition. Very small desirable size at just 8 inches wide x 5 7/8 deep x 4 tall.

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Deeply Carved Sailor-Made Box

New England, likely Coastal Massachusetts, ca. mid 19th century. Pine top and bottom; ash side band. Joinery is with copper tacks, a feature seen in Eastern Massachusetts. The lid, with deep patina and tool marks making it resemble leather, exhibits a compass rose centered by a six-lobed flower, with extensive chip carving about the inner and outer perimeters. The underside of the lid is carved with a hex symbol inside a larger one. One side of the box is lightly engraved with the beginnings of what appears to be a two-headed sea creature. Good condition with thin dry over-varnish with some "bleached drip lines" and a small breakout at a lower nail. About 6 inches diameter x 2 3/4 inches tall. The patina is so rich that it must give a clue as to what the box stored, yet I can only speculate. A maritime box to be sure, and most likely carved by a sailor while at sea. .

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A GREAT RARITY IN EARLY AMERICAN LIGHTING

New England, ca. 1800. ONE-OF-A-KIND. SOULFUL. OF REMARKABLE FORM AND ORIGINALITY HAVING NOT BEEN ON THE MARKET IN AT LEAST 40 YEARS. Ash and pine. Wooden-peg and cut-nail joinery. Vent holes form the initials 'L' and 'M', likely for whom the lantern was made. The design has a compelling folk art presence with a whimsical sideward bias: two side walls vertical, the others angled toward them. Unified by a dry red-painted surface resulting from more than two centuries of handling and exposure. The character is augmented by thin, wavy glass with expected pronounced distortions, held in place by un-headed cut nails. A small leather-hinged door provides access to the interior, its diminutive opening limiting a smaller hand to pass through, perhaps that of the lady 'LM'. The leather hinges are remarkable in their own-right, well worn yet undisturbed, and encrusted with paint and grunge. The carved turnbuckle is also original. The door opens to the first wrought iron candle socket, which pierces the lantern bottom and is held in place by a wooden wedge. It is significant that the original socket remains, as many lanterns had it replaced due to deterioration from heat and from candles being pushed in and stubs pried out. It also suggests, combined with the presence of the first leather-hinges, that this lantern had limited use in period, probably not an everyday object but rather withheld for special times. Eye-catching verticality and presence as it stands about 15 1/2 inches tall not including the wire hanger; base dimensions about 6 inches x 6 1/2.....Comparable painted treen lanterns are exceedingly rare. See lot 264, Weld Collection, Skinner Auction, August 13, 2000 for comparison. For the advanced collector pursuing the best. .

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Impressive Painted Tinware Coffee Pot.....SOLD

Probably the Filley tinware shop, Philadelphia, PA, 1818-1853. Crooked-spout coffee pot boldly decorated with a large cartouche of flowers on the body (front and back) in saturated hues of green, red, and yellow with black accents, with yellow banding about the lid and body. The lid is capped by the original brass pull. Wonderful condition, with colors remaining bright and typical background asphaltum wear. An exceptional example! A fine way to add eye-catching splashes of color from a period object. See American Painted Tinware, Martin and Tucker, VIII, for reference. About 10 1/2 inches tall.

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Wonderful Collection of Early Painted Oval Hingham Boxes.....SOLD

From the celebrated woodworking town of Hingham, Massachusetts, ca. mid-19th century. All oval in original painted surfaces with opposing fingers. Colors of gray, yellow, green, green-blue, and red in dry, patinated mellowed surfaces that work beautifully together as a graduated stack or mixed arrangement. Details: Gray paint, probably Hersey, copper tacks and wooden pins, 4 7/8 x 3 5/8 x 1 11/16 inches. Yellow paint, copper tacks and wooden pins, 5 7/8 x 4 1/23 x 2 1/4 inches. Green paint, probably Hersey, copper tacks and wooden pins, 5 1/2 x 4 x 2 inches. Blue, oxidized to a greenish blue, probably Hersey, copper tacks and wooden pins, 6 5/16 x 4 11/16 x 2 1/2 inches. Red paint, iron tacks, 6 1/2 x 5 x 2 3/4 inches. All in good condition. Years ago in the collection of American Hurrah.

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