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FOLK ART BRILLIANCE: Thrilling Portrait of a Sweet Young Girl in Salmon Dress.....SOLD

New Hampshire, ca. 1845. Oil on canvas in original red painted frame. Attributed to H.K. Goodman, whose few known paintings include a family portrait in the Shelburne Museum. Goodman portrayed this pretty little girl with softness and a successful balance of color and calm. Must have been a proud day for her, to have her portrait taken. She has an endearing slightly-turned pose, holding flowers, with a distinctive star pattern to the leaves. These characteristics are also seen in the Goodman family portrait at the Shelburne Museum, and in another little girl portrait in the Don and Faye Walters Collection (Sotheby's, 1986). The mustard-colored tiebacks of the draperies are a perfect splash of light. Found in Claremont NH about a decade ago within the home of the oldest family in that area, the portrait having never being out of that family till then. Virtually untouched original condition with just a minor repair to a small slit in the background that the family had closed with a band aid, and a little rub on the extreme upper right. Frame size about 29 inches tall x 27 wide. Pictured in Antiques and Fine Art, Autumn/Fall, 2013. The harmony of the colors, her sweet face, the remarkable original condition, the frame.....this is folk art at its finest.

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MANITOU EFFIGY FEAST BOWL-Native American Wooden Sculpture.....SALE PENDING

Western Great Lakes Woodlands Indians, ca. 1840. Figurative speciman of ash wood. The water spirit MANITOU, and the use of WOOD, were critical to Native American belief systems. Their spirituality, ceremonies, and rituals formed an integral part of their very being. The forest is where their forefathers lived, the wood the body of their ancestors, such that a ceremonial feast bowl made from their ancestors helped nourish present and future generations. The esteemed and feared MANITOU, the powerful and sacred guardian and keeper of the lakes and rivers, was often manifest as a likeness on bowls, ladles, and clubs . To portray the Manitou in effigy on a bowl is witness to the importance of the water spirit and to the wood. The effigy on this important and rare bowl is especially BOLD, presenting strongly from across the room. The design is "asymmetric", as favored in Western Great Lakes bowls, with an effigy on only one end that integrates with its functionality as a handle. The figure of the ash wood chosen is graphic. Thinly hewn, condition is excellent, dimensions about 19 inches long x 13 7/8 wide x 7 deep. See: "Great Lakes Indian Art", David Penny, and "The Evolution of the Water Manitou as Seen through its Presence in Woodlands Bowls and Ladles", Steve Powers. Relates closely to a bowl at the Detroit Institute of the Arts. Possibly Eastern Sioux, could also be Chippewa or Ottawa. Provenance: Brant Mackley Gallery, Steve Powers, private collections. .

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A LITTLE MASTERWORK(!!!) PORTRAIT OF A BABY BOY WITH RIDING CROP

New England, ca. 1845. One of the finest Prior-school portraits of this type known. Attributed to William Mathew Prior . Oil on board. The inviting warm color palette complemented by the striking, unique, paint decorated frame. The shape of the lips and eyes, and softness of the face are exceptional. The child centering colorful draped swags with rim lighting. Note red corals at each sleeve of the delicate, lace-trimmed dress, the coral typically worn by children as it was believed to ward off evil. He grasps a riding crop, a device sometimes held in portraits as they were a common gift for boys in this period. Even though way too young to ride a living horse or pony, he could saddle-up with his crop on his rocking horse. The paint decorated frame is a treasure on its own, yet combined with the portrait creates a singular presence. Overall frame size about 18 inches x 13 3/4. Exceptional condition. Provenance: Distinguished private collection for decades. A rare opportunity to acquire an iconic folk art image.

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Important Folk Art Arrangement from the Collection of Barry Cohen.....SOLD

American, individual pieces and basket, second half, 19th century. Singular, elaborate tinned-iron basket with velvet and felt fruit and vegetables, and fabric birds, collected and composed by Barry Cohen, an artist, teacher, collector, and major influencer of the folk-art community for thirty years. Barry Cohen's legacy was his unique and remarkable ability to find antique objects and assemble them into incomparable expressions of folk art. As written in the catalogue: The Barry Cohen Collection by David Schorsch and American Hurrah, 1990: "Barry delighted in transforming "simple objects of beauty" into "minor masterpieces" through his exceptionally sophisticated compositions.".....This fabulous basket was made in the 19th century when there was a tradition of gifting fanciful objects in tin on tenth wedding anniversaries. It stands about 20 1/2 inches tall and is surmounted by two star ornaments. On its own, the basket represents as fine an example of anniversary tin as one can find, yet is filled and designed to overflowing with a three-dimensional composition of fruit, vegetables, and birds. Each fruit, vegetable, and bird is also a wonderful element on its own....Described and pictured on pages 14-15 of the Barry Cohen catalogue..

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NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORICAL ART: MASTERPIECE CARVED WALKING STICK.....SALE PENDING

Eastern Woodlands, probably Great Lakes, ca. 1870, perhaps earlier. My enthusiasm for this elegantly carved horse is UNBRIDLED. Carved by a gifted Native American artist, chances are to honor his favorite horse. It is so unique that I remembered it instantly from years ago when offered by noted folk art dealer Marna Anderson. The graceful, stylized head appears to be from maple, with a gorgeous worn black stain. Retaining the original amber glass-bead eyes. The carving joined to the shaft at the position of a metal ring. A hole just below the ring held decorative attachments, like feathers. The shaft retains a reddish stain and the nubs from branches which add unexpected interest and character. The last few inches protected with a metal ferrule. The whole in superb rich patina. About 37 inches long. Comes with the floor stand as shown, but may also be wall hung. Thrilling that it has survived and in such amazing condition, this Native American wooden sculpture will bring joy each time it is seen. See Horse Imagery in Native American Art, within the book GREAT LAKES INDIAN ART, David Penny, that details the critical importance of horses to the Native American. Provenance includes Marna Anderson, Steve Powers, distinguished collector Peter Brams, Harris Diamant. and a private South Dakota collection.

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Important Portrait Miniature by Rufus Porter Likely Portraying a Young Native American.....SALE PENDING

Watercolor and pencil on paper in red-painted period frame, ca 1830. THE ARTIST: Rufus Porter (1792-1884) a celebrated artist, musician, teacher, inventor, and founder of Scientific American magazine. Painstakingly and crisply rendered in a manner for which Porter is acclaimed. THE SUBJECT (summary of research by the previous owner): Depicting a Native American man in the garb of an educated, socially established white man, extremely rare for a non-white in this period. The possible/plausible identity of the sitter is thus reduced to a very few. Two of the most likely candidates are Elias Boudinot and John Ridge, young leaders of the Cherokee Nation. Both were of mixed-race, raised among the Cherokees in Georgia, and educated at the Foreign Mission School in Cornwall CT. Both were fully literate and prominent in their Nation. In the 1830s they traveled widely throughout the United States, advocating in favor of the Cherokees and against the idea of "Indian removal". In the course of these travels they became well and widely known. Boudinot's founding of The Cherokee Phoenix, the first Indian newspaper published anywhere, added to his fame. (Both men eventually acceded to the US government's removal project, and for that were assassinated by tribal opponents, in Oklahoma.). Frame of about 6 1/4 inches x 5 1/4. Pictured page 34 "A LOVING LIKENESS, AMERICAN PORTRAITS OF THE 19TH CENTURY", The Gallery at Bristol-Meyers Squibb. Provenance: Ray Egan, private collection. .

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IMPORTANT HISTORIC ANTIQUE SIGNBOARD. PATRIOTIC EAGLE AND SHIELD. SYMBOLS OF AMERICA.....SOLD

AMONG THE FINEST OF PATRIOTIC IMAGES KNOWN. Masterpiece folk art interpretation of the Great Seal of the United States of America centering rare signage for a US Marshal. Powerful. Dramatic. Confident. Inspiring. Brilliantly composed, rich with the visual vocabulary of America, like an illustrated time-capsule, revealing the deep pride and gratitude of early American's in their young country. Lansingburgh, New York, ca. 1853. Signed by the artist J. Follett. Painted on wood panel, for the appointment of John Mott as United States Marshall for the Northern District of NY State by U.S. President Franklin Pierce. The visual is glorious. The majestic eagle's talons firmly hold the bold red, white, and blue shield against his breast. E PLURIBUS UNUM is affirmed by his intense gaze as he supports the blue ribbon in his powerful beak. The roiling sun-filled clouds are a perfect backdrop to make the arrows (birth in warfare) and olive branches (hope for a prosperous, peaceful nation) stand out. Likewise, the gray-blue clouds, and dark wings contrast and frame the eagle's white head. The artist effectively rendered the US Marshal message, in gilt lettering against a sage ground, subordinate to and without competing with the eagle and shield. A thrilling signboard at the pinnacle of early American folk art. About 34 inches tall x 22 wide x 1/2 thick, with beveled edge. Condition: Unweathered as always presented indoors. Touch-up to scratches and lightly cleaned. Full condition report available. .

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Delicate DIMINUTIVE Swing Handle Painted Bucket.....SOLD

Northeast, ca. early 19th century. Pine staves with likely ash bands. Original very dry bittersweet paint that may tend toward salmon in some lighting. Interior is unpainted in rich patina. Showing skill and precision in its design and craftsmanship, this little bucket is a rarity. Crisp, thin, button-hole bands hold the staves tightly, the maker chamfering the upper portion of the staves to give them an even thinner appearance. Two of the staves are longer such that they can hold the wooden-pegged buttons that secure the swing handle. This bucket was really used as evidenced by the paint wear, especially to the handle. Use is unknown, although traces of white residue suggest perhaps a dairy usage. Structural condition is exemplary (apparent replacement of just one wooden pin). The bucket weighs next to nothing which makes it survival even more impressive. Almost miniature JUST 3 7/8 inches to the top of the sides, 5 to the top of the extended staves holding the swing handle, diameter 5 3/4 x 6 (shrunk out of round). Choice form, small size, surface, condition.....sculptural historic art.

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Scarce MINIATURE Bowl/Trencher in Blue Paint.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca. 1840. A scarce example of a common form, just 10 3/4 inches long (most are double to triple this size). Original blue paint (the interior unpainted). Also original darkened over-varnish, with much of the wear we see in the varnish. There is notable wear to the paint along one chamfered edge, as shown. Structurally excellent with no cracks or damage. Rich in character. Not many of these small examples around, especially in blue paint.

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Primitive Small Fragment-Size Painted Courting Mirror.....SOLD

Northeast, probably New England, ca. 1800-1840. Original dry red and black paint on pine or poplar. Sawn and carved, the simple design of an oval, chamfered all the way around meeting at a ridge at the bottom, with a black paint applied near the edges, the body in a rich brick red. Wear at the 3 and 9 o'clock positions reflect where it was most often held. The glass is original, retaining traces of the red paint on its surface about the perimeter. The back also has a chamfered border. Mirrored glass in this period was expensive and prized. A good example of country painted treen/Americana. About 9 1/2 inches tall x 8 5/8 wide x ¾ thick.

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