Home  >  Antiques
Antiques
Elegant Young Woman in Green Dress Signed by William Kennedy

Probably Maryland. Signed and dated in pencil, upper right back of frame "William W. Kennedy/1854". Oil on artist board. Exhibiting unusually fluid brushwork, this important signed and dated portrait is a superior example of Kennedy's artistry, illustrating an especially attractive young woman. It rises above his more formulaic, symbolic likenesses and is painterly and spontaneous while portraying a quiet confidence. Note the background flowers, a feature associated with Kennedy. In a superb state of preservation; professionally cleaned of yellowed over-varnish, mint condition with no restoration. The original frame was expertly re-veneered. Painting size about 17 inches x 13 3/4. Frame 20 3/4 x 17 3/4. Kennedy (1818-after 1870) was a native of New Hampshire and itinerant member of the Prior-Hamblin school of painters. He painted in New Bedford, MA in 1845; Ledyard, CT in 1846; and Berwick, ME in 1847. By 1850 he had moved to Baltimore, MD where he lived just a few doors away from William Matthew Prior. Provenance: "Important Americana" Sotheby's, February 1, 1986, lot 434. Collection of folk art historians and authors' "Mr. and Mrs Howard Fertig", Livingston, NJ. Exhibited: "The Fertig Collection of Folk Art" The Morris Museum, Morristown, NJ, 1991; David Schorsch; Don Olson; private Southern collection..

More Information
Soulful Early American Wallbox in Historic Red Painted Surface

New England, ca. 18th century. Hand-planed pine, with soulful very dry, original red paint with patterns of wear that speak to how it was handled and used. Appears untouched. Case joinery including wrought T-head nails, the drawer with large dovetails tightened probably years later with cut nails. The back of the drawer bears the inscription SS-245, likely an old museum accession number. About 18 ¼ inches tall x 6 5/8 wide x 4 ½ deep. May be hung or rest on a horizontal surface. If you seek early Americana in high-character original paint and dry surface showing the story of its usage, then this box is for you. Few wallboxes with this caliber of surface, form, and originality come to market. Provenance: Midwestern collection years ago from David Good.

More Information
Rare, Miniature Painted Bushel Basket.....SALE PENDING

Probably Northeast, ca. 19th century. Nicely patinated "oyster" white paint over first red. Perhaps a so called salesman's sample, this little piece is too well made to have been just for nice. The curved slats would have been steamed about a mold, as were the tightly fitting perimeter moldings (joined by cut nails as is the round foot). Hoop handles. Perfect form in exceptional condition. Pictured in the celebrated folk art collection of Peter Brams (Skinner, Feb 25, 2001, lot 1461). Just 5 ½ inch diameter x 3 1/8 tall, not including the handles. Private Northeast collection.

More Information
Important Pair Small Portraits on Wooden Panels. Attributed to Jasper Miles (formerly known as Mr. Boyd).....SALE PENDING

Likely Ohio, New York State, or Pennsylvania, ca. 1830-1840. For many years portraits by this artist were attributed to "Mr Boyd". Recent research has now identified "Mr Boyd" as actually Jasper Miles (1782-1849). See Magazine Antiques, July/August 2016 for the research by David Allaway, "Jasper Miles-19th c. Portrait Artist". As is characteristic with other examples by Miles, this pair is oil paint on wooden panels (probably poplar), the panels about nine by seven inches; they have an extraordinary attention to detail in the hair, which is drawn in miniaturist technique with a sharp-pointed brush; and there is a distinctive horn-shaped shading to the inner ear (look closely at the man's ear). The man has an upright posture, and his far arm is suggested simply by a triangle. As with others of this period, the ovals have rough edges that would be concealed by a cardboard or eglomise mat, and one can see Miles' color tests and/or brush cleaning outside the image area. Both sitters' clothing shows subtle, extensive detail, while the lovely young lady's portrait is enhanced by the splash of color from yellow ribbons in her lace bonnet and her salmon shawl. Note the gentleman's tie in the form of a bow, his high collar, double-breasted coat, and swept-aside hair part, all high-style for this period. Excellent condition with exceedingly minor retouch to background. Frames are contemporary, made to fit these profiles several decades ago. Overall frame sizes about 11 inches x 9 1/4. Provenance: Long-time Private Collection from Peter Tillou; David Wheatcroft, Don Olson, private Southern Collection. HAPPY TO EMAIL HIGH RES PHOTOS.

More Information
Black Hawk Weathervane.....Sensational Historic Weathered Verdigris Surface

Northeast, likely made by Cushing & White or Jewell, ca. Civil War period to 1875. The visual appeal of the best authentic early weathervanes often relate to the aesthetics of their surface. This Black Hawk has a beautiful blue-green verdigris on copper that developed over many years of outside exposure, and does not appear to ever having had a second gilding. The rich color and sculptural form elevate it to art that would stand out in a historic or contemporary setting. Black Hawks are amongst the most sought after weathervane forms owing to their proud, elegant, powerful stance. This Blackhawk is further distinguished by its finely detailed mane and tail hair (and three-dimensional tail) that enrich its silhouette. Its flattened body allows it to be placed on a narrow shelf, windowsill, or mantel. Black Hawk, born 1833 in New Hampshire, was a famous black stallion described as coming nearer to the ideal of the perfect horse than any other animal ever seen; abundant spirit and life, bold, fearless, and graceful. About 24 inches long x 19 ½ (to the top of the ears when mounted in the stand), the body about 2 inches thick. Exceptional condition. See the terrific new book, American Weathervanes, The Art of the Winds, Robert Shaw, for reference. Pictured: The Olde Hope Collection, Summer 2008.

More Information
FOLK ART BRILLIANCE: Thrilling Portrait of a Sweet Young Girl in Salmon Dress.....SOLD

New Hampshire, ca. 1845. Oil on canvas in original red painted frame. Attributed to H.K. Goodman, whose few known paintings include a family portrait in the Shelburne Museum. Goodman portrayed this pretty little girl with softness and a successful balance of color and calm. Must have been a proud day for her, to have her portrait taken. She has an endearing slightly-turned pose, holding flowers, with a distinctive star pattern to the leaves. These characteristics are also seen in the Goodman family portrait at the Shelburne Museum, and in another little girl portrait in the Don and Faye Walters Collection (Sotheby's, 1986). The mustard-colored tiebacks of the draperies are a perfect splash of light. Found in Claremont NH about a decade ago within the home of the oldest family in that area, the portrait having never being out of that family till then. Virtually untouched original condition with just a minor repair to a small slit in the background that the family had closed with a band aid, and a little rub on the extreme upper right. Frame size about 29 inches tall x 27 wide. Pictured in Antiques and Fine Art, Autumn/Fall, 2013. The harmony of the colors, her sweet face, the remarkable original condition, the frame.....this is folk art at its finest.

More Information
MANITOU EFFIGY FEAST BOWL-Native American Wooden Sculpture.....SALE PENDING

Western Great Lakes Woodlands Indians, ca. 1840. Figurative speciman of ash wood. The water spirit MANITOU, and the use of WOOD, were critical to Native American belief systems. Their spirituality, ceremonies, and rituals formed an integral part of their very being. The forest is where their forefathers lived, the wood the body of their ancestors, such that a ceremonial feast bowl made from their ancestors helped nourish present and future generations. The esteemed and feared MANITOU, the powerful and sacred guardian and keeper of the lakes and rivers, was often manifest as a likeness on bowls, ladles, and clubs . To portray the Manitou in effigy on a bowl is witness to the importance of the water spirit and to the wood. The effigy on this important and rare bowl is especially BOLD, presenting strongly from across the room. The design is "asymmetric", as favored in Western Great Lakes bowls, with an effigy on only one end that integrates with its functionality as a handle. The figure of the ash wood chosen is graphic. Thinly hewn, condition is excellent, dimensions about 19 inches long x 13 7/8 wide x 7 deep. See: "Great Lakes Indian Art", David Penny, and "The Evolution of the Water Manitou as Seen through its Presence in Woodlands Bowls and Ladles", Steve Powers. Relates closely to a bowl at the Detroit Institute of the Arts. Possibly Eastern Sioux, could also be Chippewa or Ottawa. Provenance: Brant Mackley Gallery, Steve Powers, private collections. .

More Information
A LITTLE MASTERWORK(!!!) PORTRAIT OF A BABY BOY WITH RIDING CROP

New England, ca. 1845. One of the finest Prior-school portraits of this type known. Attributed to William Mathew Prior . Oil on board. The inviting warm color palette complemented by the striking, unique, paint decorated frame. The shape of the lips and eyes, and softness of the face are exceptional. The child centering colorful draped swags with rim lighting. Note red corals at each sleeve of the delicate, lace-trimmed dress, the coral typically worn by children as it was believed to ward off evil. He grasps a riding crop, a device sometimes held in portraits as they were a common gift for boys in this period. Even though way too young to ride a living horse or pony, he could saddle-up with his crop on his rocking horse. The paint decorated frame is a treasure on its own, yet combined with the portrait creates a singular presence. Overall frame size about 18 inches x 13 3/4. Exceptional condition. Provenance: Distinguished private collection for decades. A rare opportunity to acquire an iconic folk art image.

More Information
Bold Pair Sunburst Tin Candle Sconces.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca. 1780-1820. Tinned sheet iron. Featuring rare fluted sunburst crests above narrow sloping side walls and large splash pans each with a single candle cup. Just above the splash pans fitted with tabs that may have been intended to hold additional reflection, but no evidence of every having done so. Fine original condition, the right hand sconce having minor separation at the base. May be hung or rest on a horizontal surface. Each about 14 ½ inches tall x 7 wide at the tray x 4 deep. From a very fine long term New England collection; Nathan Liverant and Son Antiques..

More Information
NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORICAL ART: MASTERPIECE CARVED WALKING STICK.....SOLD

Eastern Woodlands, probably Great Lakes, ca. 1870, perhaps earlier. My enthusiasm for this elegantly carved horse is UNBRIDLED. Carved by a gifted Native American artist, chances are to honor his favorite horse. It is so unique that I remembered it instantly from years ago when offered by noted folk art dealer Marna Anderson. The graceful, stylized head appears to be from maple, with a gorgeous worn black stain. Retaining the original amber glass-bead eyes. The carving joined to the shaft at the position of a metal ring. A hole just below the ring held decorative attachments, like feathers. The shaft retains a reddish stain and the nubs from branches which add unexpected interest and character. The last few inches protected with a metal ferrule. The whole in superb rich patina. About 37 inches long. Comes with the floor stand as shown, but may also be wall hung. Thrilling that it has survived and in such amazing condition, this Native American wooden sculpture will bring joy each time it is seen. See Horse Imagery in Native American Art, within the book GREAT LAKES INDIAN ART, David Penny, that details the critical importance of horses to the Native American. Provenance includes Marna Anderson, Steve Powers, distinguished collector Peter Brams, Harris Diamant. and a private South Dakota collection.

More Information