Home  >  Antiques
Antiques
Iconic American Colonial Tavern Tankard . Impressive Size. Remarkable Condition. Noteworthy Provenance.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca. 1750-1780. Cooper-made with pine staves, lid, and base, and what appears to be ash interlocking bands. UNTOUCHED original condition with completely dry surface and natural patina. Clever construction without the use of nails, the handle being part of a narrow stave that is secured tightly in-place by beautifully crafted interlocking bands that were shrunk into position. The severely sloping and tapering lid (the deep angle consistent with the very early date) is joined to the handle by a wooden pin. The enormous scale (about 11 inches tall x 8 diameter at the base) indicates use in a tavern as a sharing vessel rather than for individual drinking. The sidewalls are steeply sloped. The elegance and sophistication of the design combined with the superior craftsmanship are hallmarks of early period work. The condition can be best described as AWESOME! Reference: "Illustrated Encyclopedia of the American Revolution" by George Neumann and Frank Kravic. Provenance: Gifted in the 1950s by Nina Fletcher Little to her close friend Alice Andrews of Winchester, Massachusetts. A SUPERIOR EXAMPLE. Happy to email high res photos.

More Information
OUTSTANDING Portrait of a Handsome Teen/Young Man.... Prior

New England, ca. 1835-1845. Oil on pressed board. Attributed to William Mathew Prior (1806-1873). Prior rendered a fun and outgoing likeness of a most confident, pleasant and fashionable sparkly blue-eyed teen/young man with straight hair ending in curls, his black coat and cravat revealing a fine yellow-patterned vest. The painting is bright and clear and appears to be in all original condition retaining its first over-varnish. No appearance of in-painting. Unobtrusive typical minor waviness to the board. Overall frame size about 19 inches tall x 14 1/2 wide; site size about 13 1/2 x 9 1/2. The period frame with cornerblocks is special and presents the painting exceptionally well. The frame bears the label of Montfort Coolidge (1888-1954) of Ogunquit, Maine, a famous artist and antiques dealer. See Artist and Visionary, William Mathew Prior Revealed, Fennimore Art Museum, for reference. A sensational example of Prior's work.

More Information
Portrait Miniature of a Young Woman. JA Davis

New England, likely Rhode Island, yet also possibly south-central New Hampshire, northeastern Massachusetts, or eastern Connecticut, ca. 1830-1840. Watercolor and pencil on paper. Confidently attributed to Jane Anthony Davis. Paintings by "Jane Anthony Davis" were assigned to "JA Davis" until relatively recent discovery of her full identity........Attired in the fashionable full puffy sleeves of the 1830's, this blue-eyed woman has her hair held by a tortoiseshell comb, and wears long earrings and necklace. The lack of proper linear perspective of her tiny hand amplifies the desirable, sought after folky nature of this likeness. Portraits by itinerant artists in this period, pre-photography, were prized as they were often the only visual record of the sitter, and also showed their station and accomplishment. Presented in a terrific grungy-surface early frame which may be original. Frame size about 5 1/4 inches x 4 1/2, retaining original brass hanging hoop. Reference: See "Three New England Watercolor Painters" pp 42-55 for a number of other portraits by Davis. Provenance: Private collection; David Wheatcroft.

More Information
Important Coffin Family of Nantucket Candle Lantern.....SALE PENDING

Nantucket, ca. 1750. Unusual construction likely influenced by needs aboard whaling vessels. Pine with natural surface and sensational occluded wavy glass. In addition to the rare "diamond" window form, this lantern is further elevated by BOLD DOVETAILS, and a door that opens from the back. Dovetails are tightened by reinforcing ROSE HEAD NAILS, while the glass is held by tiny forged brads. The door retains its original snipe hinges and tin latch. The top retains the original tinned-iron vent. Condition is very good with several character-adding period repairs including an early wire closure of a crack on the door, and a tin sheet across the inner top of the door held by early nails. The hanging hole in the backboard is more typical of that seen on wallboxes, not lanterns, indicating a wall mount. About 14 inches tall x 5 3/4 wide x 5 1/2 deep. Until recently, this lantern had not left the prominent Coffin family of Nantucket. The Coffins were a group of whalers operating out of Nantucket from the 17th to 19th centuries. Tristram Coffin (ca. 1609-1681) came to Massachusetts from England. In 1659 he led a group of investors that bought Nantucket from Thomas Mayhew for thirty pounds and two beaver hats. He became a prominent citizen of the settlement. A great number of his descendants also became prominent citizens, and many were involved in the later history of Nantucket during and after its heyday as a whaling center. Almost all notable Americans with roots in Nantucket are descended from Tristram Coffin.

More Information
ANCIENT DEEPLY CARVED LOOKING GLASS. UNTOUCHED NEW ENGLAND RARITY.....SALE PENDING

New England, possibly Connecticut River Valley, ca. mid-18th century. White pine, with original paint and mirror glass. An important survival in untouched original condition including glass cut to fit within the shaped crest and first-rate dry dark brown painted surface. Crest carved with pinwheels while the stiles exhibit three levels of deeply carved curvilinear shapes. The edge surrounding the glass is finely bordered with "crenulated" squares. The richly patinated tombstone-shaped back is remarkable. Mortice and tenon wooden pegs used to join the frame (nails only used to secure the backboard). For decades hung in a period New England home. About 17 inches tall x 11 wide.

More Information
"Hot Soda" Sign Board

American, ca. 1860-1890. Original polychrome paint on pine.....19th-century consumers were enthralled by the supposed healing properties of fizzy water. Grand devices were invented which made brewing and serving fizzy drinks easy. This trade-sign proudly declared that the vendor had fizzy water in the form of hot soda....the bright yellow ground color and bold black lettering with gold shadowing was intentionally obtrusive to attract customers from a distance......Angled corners with molding applied by cut nails. Signed by the maker/artist "Emery". Terrific crackled surface. An unusually energizing sign both in visual impact and in subject. About 72 inches long x 13 tall.

More Information
Important Portrait of Samuel Gore, BOSTON TEA PARTY....PATRIOT and SON OF LIBERTY

Boston, ca. 1796, painted by Christian Gullager (1759-1826). Oil on canvas. As a member of the Sons of Liberty, Gore participated in several well-known events in pre-revolutionary Boston, including that of February, 1770, in which the Sons of Liberty taunted a known Tory and informer to the British: Ebenezer Richardson. They cornered Richardson at his home and hurled insults and garbage. Richardson responded by firing from his doorway, killing eleven year old Christopher Seider, and severely wounding Gore, who was treated by Dr Joseph Warren, a leader of the revolution movement who was killed at the Battle of Bunker Hill. Gore also participated in the Boston Tea Party with Paul Revere and others on Dec. 16, 1773, and the stealing of the canon from the gun-house in Boston. Gore served briefly in the Revolutionary War under General John Hancock. Probably painted circa 1796 after his father's passing to commemorate his new standing as sole owner of his merchant business that provided "colors" and "patterns" to Boston. MUCH MORE BACKGROUND IS AVAILABLE ON SAMUEL GORE.....The artist, Christian Gullager, immigrated to Newburyport, MA in the mid 1780's. By 1789 he is listed as a portrait painter in the Boston directory. From this time to his departure in late 1796 or early 1797 he was known as one of the two best portrait painters in Boston. The Samuel Gore portrait is typical of the artists in this period in Boston period with its dashy impressionistic style. For information see "Christian Gullager, Portrait Painter to Federal America" by Marvin Sadik, 1976, which is the catalogue for an exhibition of his works at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC……Fine condition with minor retouch and is mounted in a ca. 1840 frame.

More Information
Hanging Spiked Candle-Holder/Dryer with Rich Cluster of Authentic Period Candles.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca. 1780-1810. Pine-body, with strong patina and readily visible tool marks. Retains original whittled or spokeshaved spikes which radiate upward and outward to suspend candles from their wicks, staggered to allow candles to hang without obstruction. Functioned to dry candles after making and/or as a holder for the precious hand-made candles. The hand-made candles are each a little treasure, with rich patina. A similar example is at Nina Fletcher Little's Cogswell's Grant. About 18 inches tall from the top of the holder to the bottom of the candles. Spikes extend as much as 5 1/2 inches. HAPPY TO EMAIL HIGH RES PHOTOS.

More Information
Paint Decorated Box "Harbor and Home"

New England, ca. 1816-1825. Pine. Featuring a charming landscape scene highlighted by a three masted ship on the left and white colonial house on a hill to the right. The combination of sailing vessel and landscape illustrates the importance of "harbor and home" in early 19th century America. The ship and home are painted onto a bright yellow ground, which is now deeply patinated and mellowed to a warm yellow/mustard. Large trees wrap around each corner, a most unusual and successful visual treatment. Another most unusual feature is a pierced copper American coin, a Matron Head Large Cent, DATED 1816, employed as a hasp between a wire staple on the lid, and a conforming staple on the case. The structural condition is terrific. The painted surface is very dry and crackled, in untouched, well worn, well used condition with abrasions as shown. Dimensions: 16.25 inches wide x 10 tall x 7.75 deep. Provenance: Originally found in a superb New England collection of early material. This box is especially fitting for a collection of early Americana with strong emphasis on original, dry, historic surfaces.

More Information
Striking Polychrome Paint Decorated Box

New England, likely Maine, ca. 1830. Original paint and brass pull on basswood. Especially animated example highlighted by vibrant curved, straight, and circular bands, all walked along the surface with sponge or leather to create movement, all set within bold borders. The use of green to contrast the warm hues is very effective. Early internal wallpaper. Structurally excellent condition. Unobtrusive wear to paint from use, especially on the left hand panel. Extensive paint decoration this pronounced is typically found on large domed boxes, yet this box has a compact size of about 13 inches wide x 8 3/8 deep x 5 5/8 tall. See Fales, American Painted Furniture, page 208, figure 336, for another Maine box bearing similar decoration. Also see Sumpter Priddy, American Fancy, to understand better the motivations behind elaborate paint decoration..

More Information