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Historic Trade Sign with Rare Subject. A Treasure For Period House and Furniture Admirers.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca. 1800. This very desirable subject elevates this piece considerably. IMAGINE the woodwork and furniture discussed and produced by those passing under this sign. Single board with square nailed bold picture-frame molding. Dry, unvarnished original black lettering over patinated oyster-white, the lettering rendered by a professional painter. Note the early use of the "comma" after HOUSE, and the large "period" after WORK, punctuations seen on signage of this time. More skilled and precise than the "carpenter" (who built a home's structure), the "house-joiner" worked within the house, producing decorative moldings and trims, mantelpieces, window and door frames, and built-ins such as shelves and cabinets, while the cabinet maker referred to fine furniture. In excellent period condition with minor "checks" and old loss to just the facing of the end-moldings. The back-side was later over-painted (in the 19th century) with signage for Book Store and Medicines. It is likely that later usage and exposure of the books/medicines side protected that House Joiner/Cabinet side allowing it to survive....About 94 inches long x 13 3/4 tall x 2 3/8 deep (at the moldings). I see this sign as a treasure for the collector that honors the gifted craftsmen of 200-plus years ago that worked with their hands to produce furniture treasures and the interiors of the homes they were made for..

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Lady's Embroidered Pocket, Dated 1812!

New England, initialed MB and dated 1812. Crewel embroidered linen work with floral and vine decoration from blue and sienna threads. In this period, pockets were not integral with the lady's clothing, rather were fastened around her waist with tape made from cotton or linen. Although they weren't meant to be seen, and were accessed via a slit in the dress, women often still decorated them. A dated example is a particularly nice find, especially from the important time period of the War of 1812. Fine condition with minor toning. About 12 inches tall. Provenance: Private New England collection: Nathan Liverant & Son Antiques. See "What Clothes Reveal", Linda Baumgarten, Colonial Williamsburg, for reference and other examples.

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MASTERPIECE CARVED PINWHEEL BOWL. Among the finest and rarest of all Colonial bowls extant.....SOLD

Northeast America, ca. 1770-1810. Maple. Original natural surface with the best color one could hope for. Remarkable movement and energy owing to the fluidity and boldness of the convex pinwheel as it gracefully bends and swells from center to rim and around the three-dimensional geometry. Challenging to lay out let alone carve, this bowl was slow-lathe turned to the basic bowl shape, then the exterior made extraordinary by an imaginative, expert wood carver also capable in mathematics. Even most pinwheels on case pieces are much more restrained (flatter and more linear). Although pinwheels are seen on 17th/18th century furniture from the Carolinas to northern New England, this bowl was most likely made in Connecticut as the animated carving compares to the free-spirited fans and pinwheels of CT case pieces, especially from the circle of Samuel Loomis. Boston/Salem and Rhode Island also possible. Superior condition without apology. Out-of-round shrinkage to a subtle oval. Robust in hand. Complex patina from handling (it was really used). About 15 inches x 14 inches in diameter x 4 1/4 deep. Provenance: Private collection acquired long ago at a charity shop in or near Marshfield, Massachusetts. After extensive research this bowl appears to be without precedent; unparalleled; unique.

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Beautiful Colorful Folk Art Family Record with Vivid Graphics

Northeast America, New York State or Connecticut, ca. 1829. Watercolor and ink on wove paper. An exceptional example of multi-generational family documentation, possibly a "school-girl" work. Probably painted when Laura Roberts Foster (b. Feb. 22, 1808 in Patterson NY) and Joshua C Foster (b. Nov 11, 1805 in Southeast NY) were married on October 15, 1829. The towns of Patterson and Southeast (written on the record) are in New York State near Danbury, CT. A family record by the same hand came to market in the 1980's from Ridgefield, CT, just a few miles from Patterson/Southeast. What a remarkable way to document their wedding, with a neatly compartmentalized composition of masterful paint, pen, and compass work. Clearly articulated symbols of trees for births, hearts for marriage, and sandglass for death. Note the fine details like the tiny flowers within the half-round border at the top, flanked by large roses. Gilt frame is period and likely original. Frame size about 18 1/4 inches tall x 15 1/4 wide; sight size about 16 1/4 x 13 1/4. Retains crisp bright colors in superb condition. See "The Art of the Family" Genealogical Artifacts in New England, for reference. Enliven your home with color and authentic pieces. High res photos available.

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GRAPHIC EARLY AMERICAN FOLK ART SHIRRED RUG WITH SCARCE DEEP-BLUE GROUND.....SOLD

New England, ca. 1840-1850. The maker expressed her feelings of optimism and abundance through this captivating shirred rug. It is true folk art, from the creativity and the vision of the gifted artist, not from a pattern. Shirred rugs, popular from the 1820s to the 1850s, were made mostly from accumulated fabric scraps tightly packed together and stitched onto homespun backing. The vivid polychrome flower, in full bloom, with upward radiating opening buds and perimeter vining, fills the composition with life and energy as if it is trying to burst beyond the confines of its borders. Shades of red, yellow, green, blue, and sage color-contrast beautifully against the rare intense indigo-blue variegated ground. This rug has an impressive color and scale that can be the focus of a room. Professionally mounted for hanging. About 50 inches wide x 36 tall. Provenance: Private collection; important rug collection of Ronnie Newman. See Kopp, "American Hooked and Sewn Rugs, Folk Art Underfoot" for reference.

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Paint Decorated American Patriot Militia Canteen Dated 1775.....SOLD

New England, likely New Hampshire or Massachusetts. "Cheese box" form in original paint on what appears to be ash or chestnut sidewall and pine top and bottom. Circa 1775-1810, yet given the form likely closer to that latter part of that date range, which would suggest that the 1775 date is commemorative. Based on oral history, this canteen was owned by Amos Barnes (1754-1840) of South Acton, MA, and N.H., who was a veteran of both the American Revolution and the War of 1812. Amos enlisted and marched to Boston in 1775 where he participated in the Battle of Bunker Hill, later Trenton (led by George Washington) in 1776, and also Monmouth. He re-enlisted in 1778, serving again with Washington at Valley Forge. The 1775 date was painted in green over white which contrasts against the blue ground and white decoration. Retains a later wide loomed strap, likely added around the War of 1812, attached to remnants of the first narrow strap. Pencil inscription reads: "Davis Blues / Grandpa Barnes". About 6 ¾ inches diameter by 2 7/8 deep. Stand was made custom to display this piece. More background information on Amos Barnes available. Provenance: Until recently in a private New England collection for about 30 years.

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7-COLOR Country Parcheesi Gameboard.....SOLD

Eastern America, 19th century. Original polychrome paint on wooden panel. Deriving movement from the primary design element of pinwheels and puncuated by blue dots, this game board has strong color-contrast that impacts from across the room. The maker worked green, red, blue, and yellow pigments against a cream background and white round reserves, borders delineated in black lining. Condition is very good with no cracks. Wear from playing and buildup of patina, and a few scattered small paint splatters. About 18 inches square x 5/8 thick. Acquired in 2001 at the Heart of Country Show in Nashville.

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A LITTLE MASTERWORK(!!!) PORTRAIT OF A BABY BOY WITH RIDING CROP

New England, ca. 1845. One of the finest Prior-school portraits of this type known. Attributed to William Mathew Prior . Oil on board. The inviting warm color palette complemented by the striking, unique, paint decorated frame. The shape of the lips and eyes, and softness of the face are exceptional. The child centering colorful draped swags with rim lighting. Note red corals at each sleeve of the delicate, lace-trimmed dress, the coral typically worn by children as it was believed to ward off evil. He grasps a riding crop, a device sometimes held in portraits as they were a common gift for boys in this period. Even though way too young to ride a living horse or pony, he could saddle-up with his crop on his rocking horse. The paint decorated frame is a treasure on its own, yet combined with the portrait creates a singular presence. Overall frame size about 18 inches x 13 3/4. Exceptional condition. Provenance: Distinguished private collection for decades. A rare opportunity to acquire an iconic folk art image.

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The BLUE MELONS and Grapes. AMERICAN FOLK ART THEOREM.....SOLD

Eastern US, ca. 1840. Watercolor on wove paper. Only a small group of blue-dominant melon theorems are known. The blue melons, each segment skillfully contrasted by green, center clusters of plump grapes, all resting on a blue-feather edged platter. Coveted folk art flatness without shadowing. The transitions between colors, areas of brightness and darkness, and fine stippling, are masterful. The seeds, subtely bordered in red, give movement as they radiate from the center as do the striations between melon segments. In a period gilt frame of about 26 1/4 inches wide x 19 1/4 tall. Excellent condition with colors remaining fresh and vibrant. Remarkable provenance includes the pioneering folk art collector Dotty Kauffaman, Barry Cohen, Edgar William and Bernice Chrysler Garbisch; and private CT folk art collection since 1979....A very similar painting, perhaps by the same hand, is in the collection of the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Center at Colonial Williamsburg. Described in Treasures of American Folk Art from the AARFAC as: "The simplicity of its design, combined with the linear quality of the upright melon slices and the encircling grape clusters, makes the small painting one of the most visually pleasing watercolors in the Center's collection".

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MINIATURE Lift Top Chest with Sophisticated Apron and Inner Folk Art Panels over Hidden Compartments. American "FANCY" Period.

Northeast America, ca. 1800 to 1825. From the AMERICAN FANCY PERIOD IN WHICH COLOR AND CREATIVITY AND IMAGINATION WERE SOUGHT TO DELIGHT THE HUMAN SPIRIT AND EXCITE THE SENSES. Pine and poplar, with untouched "sugary" varnish surface. Rich dark patina. Paint decorated with outer-case having black-over-red graining, flowers on the shaped and pierced apron and bracket feet, and red tulips on the front facade within a mustard reserve. The case conceals hidden compartments, one under a till above a decorated panel that slides up to reveal a tiny drawer. A hinged panel under the lid lifts to expose three compartments, the panel decorated on the outside with a folk art painting of a ship arriving at a wharf (note the woman and man in top hat at the window), the underside of the panel having another fanciful folk art painting of dogs pulling a chariot chased by a rider on stag. The remnant of a note includes the passage "May virtue and happiness." About 10 inches long x 7 3/4 tall x 5 1/4 deep. Provenance includes the "Tom and Carolyn Porter Collection" (Tom founder of Garths)..

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