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IMPORTANT HISTORIC SIGNBOARD. PATRIOTIC EAGLE AND SHIELD. SYMBOLS OF AMERICA

AMONG THE FINEST OF PATRIOTIC IMAGES KNOWN. Masterpiece folk art interpretation of the Great Seal of the United States of America centering rare signage for a US Marshal. Powerful. Dramatic. Confident. Inspiring. Brilliantly composed, rich with the visual vocabulary of America, like an illustrated time-capsule, revealing the deep pride and gratitude of early American's in their young country. Lansingburgh, New York, ca. 1853. Signed by the artist J. Follett. Painted on wood panel, for the appointment of John Mott as United States Marshall for the Northern District of NY State by U.S. President Franklin Pierce. The visual is glorious. The majestic eagle's talons firmly hold the bold red, white, and blue shield against his breast. E PLURIBUS UNUM is affirmed by his intense gaze as he supports the blue ribbon in his powerful beak. The roiling sun-filled clouds are a perfect backdrop to make the arrows (birth in warfare) and olive branches (hope for a prosperous, peaceful nation) stand out. Likewise, the gray-blue clouds, and dark wings contrast and frame the eagle's white head. The artist effectively rendered the US Marshal message, in gilt lettering against a sage ground, subordinate to and without competing with the eagle and shield. A thrilling signboard at the pinnacle of early American folk art. About 34 inches tall x 22 wide x 1/2 thick, with beveled edge. Condition: Unweathered as always presented indoors. Touch-up to scratches and lightly cleaned. Provenance upon request. .

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One of the Finest Surviving Early American Volunteer Militia Knapsacks. Published. Best Provenance.....SALE PENDING

Massachusetts, ca. 1800-1825. Original paint on hand-stitched canvas, with what appears to be linen backcloth. The brick-red painted canvas flap inscribed LIBERTY against a blue ground bordered in mustard, surmounted by 13 white stars representing the original colonies. The lower body with the script initials "MM" (likely for the Massachusetts Militia) within a vibrant mustard oval. The entire with black border. Remarkably the original leather straps and canvas shoulder straps are intact and without compromise! About 13 1/4 inches square. Having great pride in their units, militias invested considerable attention on their appearance. Although typically wearing personal clothing (not uniforms) every accoutrement surface was carefully considered and put to a vote, as these objects and their decorations were a common identity. This knapsack with the notable LIBERTY and 13 stars speaks to the freshness of the memory Americans had with British rule such that liberty and patriotism were treasured and honored. Provenance: Roland B. Hammond (North Andover, MA), William H. Guthman (prominent scholar and dealer in historical and military Americana-Westport, CT). Literature: Illustrated and Discussed, The Magazine Antiques, July 1984, page 124, plate I; Decorated American Militia Equipment by William H. Guthman.

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Prior-Hamblin School Portrait of a Blue-Eyed Little Boy in Butterscotch Dress with Riding Crop.....SOLD

Attributed to STURTEVANT J. HAMBLIN (active 1837 to 1856) Portland, Maine or Boston, Massachusetts. Oil on board. Classic coveted folk art portrait with flat rendering employing minimal modeling or shadowing, elevated considerably in rarity and desirability by the subject being a young child. Detailed patterned dress with lace collar. Basis for the attribution to Hamblin includes his characteristic long tapered fingers, the pattern of the collar, and lip shape which closes matches that of another Hamblin portrait in the National Gallery of Art. Well presented in a period red-grain painted frame. Frame size about 16 1/2 inches x 12 3/4. Condition is superb. See Sotheby's, January 21, 2007 and Skinners, June 11, 2000 for a remarkably similar portrait by Hamblin, probably this sitter's brother, in the same dress. Provenance: Private Northeast collection. VERY FAVORABLE PRICE ON REQUEST.

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Scarce Authentic Pig Weathervane

Attributed to L. W. Cushing & Sons, Waltham, Massachusetts, authentic circa 1872-1900 (illustrated in Cushing catalogue 1883). Copper body and ears with verdigris surface. Cast zinc head and curly tail. Diminutive size at just 17 inches length, height 11 inches. Superb surface. Far fewer pig weathervanes were made in the 19th century than eagles, horses, and cows, so relatively few authentic period examples survive today. The little size is especially desirable as it can be place anywhere. Excellent genuine period condition. Custom-made stand. References: ART OF THE WEATHERVANE, Steve Miller, pages 42-43 for a Cushing example of the same form; INCOLLECT/ANTIQUES AND FINE ART--American Furniture And Americana Shine at The 2015 Winter Antiques Show, David Schorsch and Eileen M. Smiles; FOLK ART MAGAZINE, Fall, 1998, page 12, ad for Christies, NY, January 1999 sale with a pig weathervane by the same maker as the lead item.....Provenance: Private New England collection..

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Ancient Folk Art Doll....Carved Treen.....SALE PENDING

Most likely New England, small possibly English just owing to the age, ca. mid-18th century. Sometimes known as a bedpost doll. Pine, with traces of Windsor green paint in the recesses (worn away from generations of handling), and the richest dark patina that one could imagine. Attired in 18th century clothing that may include a stomacher, with the scarce survival of arms that are folded away from the body. The face has a much lighter color than the body, indicating that the head was often rubbed, perhaps for reassurance. Steel or brass tacks likely secured glass eyes that long ago fell away. The attitude of the doll is one of comfort and cheer. Stands about 11 inches tall. Please ask for high resolution images.

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Three Graduated Shaker Oval Storage Boxes.....SALE PENDING

Probably New Lebanon Bishopric, ca. 1850. Maple and pine secured by copper rivets and brads. Exceedingly rare set, i.e., same hand, same form, same paint. Sets such as these are seldom found. Surfaces are remarkable, which combined with the graduated sizes achieves a sculptural presence. Paint is gray, appearing toward sage in warm lighting. Lengths are 7 5/8, 9 1/8, and 10 9/16 inches, respectively. Provenance: John Keith Russell; years ago the Collection of Robert and Gordon Reid (founder of Brimfield).

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Shaker Box in Scarce WHITE Paint.....SOLD

Northeast America, ca. mid-19th century. Oval, three-fingered Shaker box with copper-tack joinery. Retaining its original very dry white paint. Pine top and bottom; maple side-walled. Paint coverage remains excellent, as is its structural condition. Interior pitted from early contents, which may have been salt. About 7 7/8 inches long x 5 3/8 wide x 2 11/16 tall. Nice box to contrast against other colors.

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Brilliant Portrait Miniature by the Talented Edwin Plummer.....SOLD

Massachusetts, Maine, or New Hampshire, ca. 1825-1835. Watercolor and gum arabic on paper. An author, lecturer, and astute business man, Plummer painted portraits often for family and friends. Finely detailed showing his delicate touch and his ability to capture a likeness with elegance and sensitivity, and to portray mood, not only physical attributes. The handsome brown-haired young man is fashionably tailored in high-collared coast with patterned embroidered yellow vest, high-white collar with pin, while resting on a red sofa, a setting seen in other Plummer portraits. Note the remarkable detailing. Presented in a period gilt frame that could be original. Frame size about 6 inchex x 5; sight size about 4 1/4 x 3 1/4. Superb! See Edwin Plummer and His "Portrait Likenesses", Deborah Child, Antiques and Fine Art, August, 2011 for reference.

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Very Cool! Graphic Gentleman's Top Hat Box

Eastern America, ca. 1825-1850. Wallpaper on pressboard, with hand-stitching. Given the vivid composition of black hat against chrome-yellow background, this box served as much as a trade sign as storage. Gentleman shoppers would be attracted to the box's bold impression. During this period the top hat, made mostly from silk. was a mainstay of life for the fashionable, respectable gentleman. Very good condition with scattered losses as shown. A rare, rather subtle feature is the tiny images of other forms of hats on the rim, suggesting advertisement for additional hats the gentleman could acquire. Lid about 14 inches x 12; 9 ½ tall. Provenance: Private Northeast collection..

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Portrait Miniature of a Charming Blue Eyed Young Woman Attributed to Jane Anthony (JA) Davis.....SALE PENDING

Probably Rhode Island or Connecticut, ca. 1830's. Watercolor on wove paper. Given the puffy-sleeve dress, which was fashionable in the 1830's, this portrait is among Davis' earlier works, since most known by her were within 1839-1845. Davis typically rendered family and friends in a distinctive style: black dress, full-face angled a bit to the right (not in profile), white highlights applied to the face and neck, and mid-length. The lack of proper linear perspective of her tiny hand and sinuous, stylized arm amplifies the desirable folky nature of this likeness. Portraits by itinerant artists, pre-photography, were prized as they were often the only visual record of the sitter, and also sometimes showed their station and accomplishment (the young lady communicates her ability to read by the showcasing of the little book). Later frame of 7 1/2 x 6 5/8 inches; site size 5 1/2 x 4 5/8. Reference: See "Three New England Watercolor Painters" pp 42-55 for other portraits by Davis..

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