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A LITTLE MASTERWORK(!!!) PORTRAIT OF A BABY BOY WITH RIDING CROP

New England, ca. 1845. One of the finest Prior-school portraits of this type known. Attributed to William Mathew Prior . Oil on board. The inviting warm color palette complemented by the striking, unique, paint decorated frame. The shape of the lips and eyes, and softness of the face are exceptional. The child centering colorful draped swags with rim lighting. Note red corals at each sleeve of the delicate, lace-trimmed dress, the coral typically worn by children as it was believed to ward off evil. He grasps a riding crop, a device sometimes held in portraits as they were a common gift for boys in this period. Even though way too young to ride a living horse or pony, he could saddle-up with his crop on his rocking horse. The paint decorated frame is a treasure on its own, yet combined with the portrait creates a singular presence. Overall frame size about 18 inches x 13 3/4. Exceptional condition. Provenance: Distinguished private collection for decades. A rare opportunity to acquire an iconic folk art image.

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Vibrant Coach/Sign Painter Double-Sided Game board with Bold Color and First-Rate Surface.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca. 3rd quarter, 19th century. Original bold red, yellow, and black on a thick pine panel with picture-frame molding joined by cut nails. One side rendered with a much more scarce backgammon game, the reverse with checkers/chess decorated with pin-striping. Retains original crackled highly crackled over-varnish, the backgammon side moreso indicating that side has been outward for most of its life. Substantial size at about 19 inches square. Graphic fiery-red color when illuminated by sun or halogen (halogen lighting shown).

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"Hot Soda" Sign Board

American, ca. 1860-1890. Original polychrome paint on pine.....19th-century consumers were enthralled by the supposed healing properties of fizzy water. Grand devices were invented which made brewing and serving fizzy drinks easy. This trade-sign proudly declared that the vendor had fizzy water in the form of hot soda....the bright yellow ground color and bold black lettering with gold shadowing was intentionally obtrusive to attract customers from a distance......Angled corners with molding applied by cut nails. Signed by the maker/artist "Emery". Terrific crackled surface. An unusually energizing sign both in visual impact and in subject. About 72 inches long x 13 tall.

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To Emeline: A Love Token with Skillfully Cut and Woven Heart in Hand

Probably New England, ca. mid-19th century. Watercolor and ink on wove paper with pin prick decoration and cut/applied paper. A scarce view into the manner of artistically expressing fondness in the mid-19th century. The written passages, addressed to Emeline (from the gentleman who appears to be 'Everett'), is eloquently written and crafted with precision. . The two segments begin with: "May thy path be all sunshine strewn with flowers". and "May thy slumber be tranquil thy dreams ever bright". The applied heart-in-hand is deftly cut. Note the red paper woven into the blue heart, the heart bordered with dotted decoration, and the surgically-cut sleeve. Presented in a period painted reeded frame. The frame about 9 inches tall x 8 3/8 wide.

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Silk Needlework Double-Memorial by a Massachusetts Schoolgirl.....SOLD

Ca. 1806 to 1815. WROUGHT BY AVILDA SAYLES FRANKLIN. WRENTHAM ACADEMY. Day's Academy (aka Wrentham Academy) was a former institute in Wrentham, Massachusetts that existed between 1806 and 1875 when it became the site of Wrentham's High School. Avilda, based on genealogical records, was born in Franklin, MA in 1787, so would have been in her late teens in the early 19th century when she embroidered this work of art and history. The double-memorial celebrates two of Avilda's siblings: Nabby Sayles who died at 3 years of age in 1799; and Lavinia Sayles, aged 7, who died in 1786. Another silk memorial from the Wrentham Academy (with a Henry Francis DuPont provenance) that sold at Northeast Auctions in 2005, has a strikingly similar composition with a young woman in Empire dress beside a plinth with double urns with arching willow tree with background hills. Avilda's memorial needlework picture was one of the expected accomplishments of a young cultured girl in early America. It is a lovely, thoughtful, and elegant work of art. Original frame about 24 inches x 20. In excellent condition with minor toning, and losses to the extreme upper left and lower right of the black corners of the eglomise panel. Happy to email high res photos.

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Very Special Love Token

New England, ca. 1820-1840. Beautifully executed fine cuttings, of paper, of a pair of love birds resting on a heart-in-hand, surrounded by an oval of plaited hair, all set upon a blue-silk backing. Presented in a deeply carved and polychrome frame which is likely the original to the artwork. Frame size of just 4 ¾ inches tall x 3 ½ wide x ¾ thick. Private collection for the last 15-20 years, having come from another private collection before that.

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Important Portrait of Samuel Gore, BOSTON TEA PARTY....PATRIOT and SON OF LIBERTY

Boston, ca. 1796, painted by Christian Gullager (1759-1826). Oil on canvas. As a member of the Sons of Liberty, Gore participated in several well-known events in pre-revolutionary Boston, including that of February, 1770, in which the Sons of Liberty taunted a known Tory and informer to the British: Ebenezer Richardson. They cornered Richardson at his home and hurled insults and garbage. Richardson responded by firing from his doorway, killing eleven year old Christopher Seider, and severely wounding Gore, who was treated by Dr Joseph Warren, a leader of the revolution movement who was killed at the Battle of Bunker Hill. Gore also participated in the Boston Tea Party with Paul Revere and others on Dec. 16, 1773, and the stealing of the canon from the gun-house in Boston. Gore served briefly in the Revolutionary War under General John Hancock. Probably painted circa 1796 after his father's passing to commemorate his new standing as sole owner of his merchant business that provided "colors" and "patterns" to Boston. MUCH MORE BACKGROUND IS AVAILABLE ON SAMUEL GORE.....The artist, Christian Gullager, immigrated to Newburyport, MA in the mid 1780's. By 1789 he is listed as a portrait painter in the Boston directory. From this time to his departure in late 1796 or early 1797 he was known as one of the two best portrait painters in Boston. The Samuel Gore portrait is typical of the artists in this period in Boston period with its dashy impressionistic style. For information see "Christian Gullager, Portrait Painter to Federal America" by Marvin Sadik, 1976, which is the catalogue for an exhibition of his works at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC……Fine condition with minor retouch and is mounted in a ca. 1840 frame.

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Watercolor Portrait Miniature of a Lovely Little Girl with Cat by HENRY WALTON.....SOLD

Probably Ithaca, New York, 1836. Watercolor on paper. Labeled at the bottom on separate paper: "Nancy Ann Halsey Age 1 Yr. 1 Mth. Painted by Henry Walton 1836". Although only 1 year old at the time, Walton rendered Nancy as an older child, an approach often seen by folk artists in this period. Sweet, blue-eyed Nancy stands alongside a painted child's-size Windsor chair and her cat, flanked by a drop-leaf dining table with table rug. The bright orange of her dress and the bold, colorful floor covering give us a look into the design and colors preferred during the American Fancy Period. Note the tiny book held in her left hand, implying the importance placed on reading by her parents. Walton created this lasting image of little Nancy with exceptional skill and sensitivity, prior to the availability of photography. Henry Walton (1820-1873), lithographer and painter. Born in England in 1820. Walton immigrated to Ithaca, NY in 1836 and worked for the lithography firm of Stone and Clark. Although a largely self-taught artist, he is noted for his artistic sophistication in miniatures, landscapes, and portraits. In 1849 he joined the Gold Rush to California. Remains in bright and colorful condition. Faint shadow lines from previous framing on the extreme edges. Presented in a dry, black-painted period frame. Frame size about 8 3/4 inches x 6 1/2. On page 29 of HENRY WALTON, 19th Century American Artist, Ithaca College Museum of Art, there is a similar portrait of Herman Halsey, rendered on the same carpet, probably the brother of Nancy, and also painted in 1836.

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Early Lighting: Whitesmithed Kettle Light (Lamp).....SOLD

Northeast America, ca. late 18th century. Iron. A wick would be place inside the kettle filled with animal fats or other oils to provide an inexpensive and readily available source of light. Whitesmiths had more refined iron and steel working skills than the blacksmith, with the latter primarily focused on more coarse utilitarian needs such as horse-shoes, nails, and pots. The whitesmith was employed to complete more aesthetically demanding or intricate work and finishing. This kettle light shows those skills of the whitesmith, from the pointed feet on quad-base with raised spines on the legs, to the central column knop, and the rather sophisticated tilting mechanism of the bowl. The light is tall and stately and unusually sophisticated for the form, the broad base (peened to the column) providing good stability. About 10 inches tall. Excellent condition. .

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Oh What a Fragment! Tour de force of Period Carving

Possibly Hudson River Valley or New Jersey, ca. 18th century. Poplar with traces of thin blue paint. Crisply, beautifully, and deeply carved including pinwheels, central fan, and quarter fans. Ends are dovetailed, and back-bottom has a dado-channel, so this fragment appears to have been a drawer front. About 35 1/2 inches long x 6 wide x 1 ¼ deep.

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