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Terrific Carved WOOD Double-Sided Jeweler /Pocket Watch Vendor Trade Sign.....SALE PENDING

American, 19th century. This sensational example stands apart from most as it is turned from wood, not zinc or cast-iron as typically encountered in this form, with wood being oh so more desirable than its metal counterparts. Very appealing gilt-paint bezel and side-wall with original dry, crackled oyster white and black paint on the clock face. The hanging ring, which also retains original gilt paint, is fashioned from iron and exhibits deep wear at the point in which the ring contacted a hanger. Exceptional condition with one side being somewhat more worn; structurally mint. A sensational example of this form that hung-outside the jewelry/watch store to beckon passersby. Being carved from wood and original dry paint would make this sign at home in an early folk art or early paint collection. Smaller size at about 14 inch diameter x 21 inches to the top of the hanging ring and 2 1/2 inches at the molded edge. Looks great hung or lying flat on a chest or table.

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Diminutive Dome Top Paint Decorated Box by the Compass Artist

Lancaster County, PA, ca. 1800-1840. OF JUST THREE DOZEN DOME TOP BOXES ATTRIBUTED TO THE COMPASS ARTIST, THIS BOX IS THE SMALLEST AT UNDER FOUR INCHES. Poplar and perhaps pine. Dovetailed case. Tiny cut nails attach the base and hand-planed lid. Decorations laid out and scribed by compass before painting. Distinctive tinned sheet iron hinges, and punchwork-decorated escutcheon plate and fan-shaped hasp are characteristic of this maker and original. Painted with a Prussian blue ground, the scribe lines highlighted with white or red paint, inner petals filled with red, and outer lobes profusely stippled with red dots. About 3.75 inches high by 3.75 wide by 2.75 deep. Untouched condition. See The Compass Artist of Lancaster County Pennsylvania, Wendy Cooper et al., American Furniture, Beckerdite, 2009, pp 62-87 for an extensive discussion of Compass Boxes. Similar boxes are in Wintherthur and the Philadelphia Museum of Art and in some of the finest folk art collections.

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Portrait of an American Icon: The DRUMMER BOY

Northeast America, ca. mid to 3rd quarter, 19th century. Oil on canvas. Possible attribution to Joseph Goodhue Chandler. A most pleasing, bold, impactful rendering with rich color. The drummer boy clutches firmly the staff of an American flag, a strong patriotic expression. A rope-tensioned field drum and wooden sticks lie beside him. The "drummer boy" has always been an iconic figure in American history. He goes into battle with no weapon, only a drum with which to rally and encourage the troops around him. The drums were an important part of the battlefield communications with drum rolls used to signal commands from officers to troops. The life of a drummer boy appeared glamorous and as a result, boys would sometimes run away from home to enlist. The image of boy drummers were depicted in paintings, sculpture and poetry..... The stretcher retains remnants of an old label reading in part "...rear entra(nce) / NEW YORK/ ...YORK/ ANTIQUES EXPOSITION... ." The label is said to have referred to Albany at one time, indicating an exhibition in that city, possibly celebrating the Centennial of 1876. Frame size about 46 inches x 31. Excellent condition with very minor touch-up; contemporary frame. Provenance: Alice Braunfeld, Los Angeles, early 1980s; private collection. .

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Federal Iron Wafer Print/Press

Northeast, ca. early 19th century. Iron. Expertly cast and finished by a skilled craftsman. A raised star within a larger star, the border rimmed by many small stars with beveled edge. For pressing a decorative pattern into wafers or perhaps butter. Wafers were made in celebration of holidays, weddings, and other special events. Excellent condition/beautifully worked. About 6 inches long.

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Extraordinary Fanciful Folk Art Mirror

Likely Pennsylvania, ca. 1840-1870. A remarkable folk art expression with dramatic silhouette in an OUTSTANDING state of originality including the dry, finely crazed original red (paint or thin pigmented varnish) and mirror-glass. Made by an inventive and skilled craftsman/artist who wanted the mirror to stand out from the others, to be its own little work of art. Ornamentation includes incised and split columns, exceptional scrolls in the crest, applied, deeply carved stars, cross-hatched stylized diamond-shaped ears in the corners, and signed in the central bottom rail "W. HOWER", flanked by punch decorated tulips and birds. Exceptional condition! Only minor cracks limited to the narrow neck of the scrolls mended in period by glue-blocks on the reverse. About 22 1/4 inches wide x 19 3/4 tall. Easily the most exceptional mirror I have ever owned, and also one of the finest pieces of folk art. For the collector was wants a unique, whimsical, folky, colorful piece that is also useful.

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Rare Baltimore Cobalt-Decorated Stoneware Flask

Baltimore, Maryland, ca. 1825. Tall, stately, boldly tapering flask with flattened sides, decorated on both faces with a large brushed cobalt-blue flower with fan-shaped blossom and cobalt-highlighted spout. Approximately 20 examples from Baltimore are known, some being attributed to maker David Parr. Excellent structural condition with no cracks. Stands about 9 1/2 inches tall, broad shoulders of about 5 inches wide tapering down to a base of 2 1/4 inches; about 2 3/8 thick. From a long time private collection. A beautiful gem!

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Magnificent Early Native American Art Form: Scarce Raised Handled Burl Bowl.....SOLD

Northeast Woodlands Indian, likely Iroquois, ca. late 18th/early 19th century. Ash burl in its original, very dry, complex unvarnished surface. Beautiful raised open carved handles. Broad and deep, oblong, measuring almost 20 inches long and across (19 1/4 inches long x 18 1/2 wide x 7 tall). Excellent condition. Sturdy, robust, weighty feel. See North American Burl Treen, Powers, pp 122-124 for other raised-handle Iroquois bowls.

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Grouping of MINIATURE Carved and Painted Shorebirds

Probably east coast, ca. late 19th to early 20th century. Three carved shorebirds in dry, polychrome paint, including one preening, resting on wire legs set within a perfect portion of driftwood. The birds are tiny, ranging from 2 5/8 inches to 3 3/8. The entire piece is about 7 inches long x 2 3/8 wide. A sweet piece that can rest on a shelf, chest, or candle stand.

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Paint Decorated Parcheesi Gameboard.....SALE PENDING

American, ca. late 19th/ early 20th century. Having an especially quiet and soft color palette, this Parcheesi board is unique in its muted reds, olive green and cream, and crisp distinctive black painted numerals and diminutive size and feel. About 12 1/2 inches square x just 1/4 inch thick. Untouched condition with dry surface and pleasing patina. Provenance includes America Hurrah and the Collection of Meryl and Jay Weiss.

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Impressive Early Carved Eagle.....SOLD

Probably New England, ca. 1800-1850. Pine. In high-relief, this primitive carving retains an untouched rich dry natural patina. In 1782 the eagle was first introduced into American design as a symbol of strength and independence. From that time onward renderings of the eagle flowed into decorative arts, signs, furniture, etc. This early carving was meant to hang, not stand, is sizable enough to have had use as a sign, yet its specific use is uncertain. It would highlight a collection of early furniture and accessories with the commonality of strong surface. About 20 1/2 inches across x 20 tall x 2 deep.

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