Home  >  Antiques
Antiques
Rare THREE KINGS Brass Candlestick.....SALE PENDING

Northwest Europe, ca. 15th century (yes, more than 5-centuries old!). A tour-de-force of form and function. The double socketed candle arm centered by a central threaded double-knopped post, peened to a raised-walled well above an incurved base. The shaped flaring arms lead to angular sockets of small size. Fine condition, with the double-arm threading worn from use such that it rests at its bottom position, the joinery underneath reinforced by re-peening, and expected minor bumps. For a virtually identical example, see Old Domestic Base-Metal Candlesticks, Michaelis, page 54, fig 55. Also, Koper and Brons, RIJKSMuseum, Amderstam. fig 144; Fire and Light, Caspall, page 81, fig 140, and The Lear Collection: A Study of Copper-Alloy Socket Candlesticks, A.D. 200-1700, Bangs, pp. 70 and 220. Center post about 12 inches tall; 9 to the top of the candlesockets. Base diameter about 4 ½ inches. Such a thrilling rarity. ..

More Information
Outstanding Polychrome Paint Decorated Treen Master Salt

Probably Northeast, possibly Pennsylvania, ca. 18th to early 19th century. Robustly turned hardwood with significant heft in hand, with a red ground decorated by black, green, and mustard. Rimmed bowl supported by stepped foot with central bladed knop. One side showing soft original over-varnish, with part of the reverse having the paint impacted from getting too close to heat (as shown). Strong patina inside. About 4 1/8 inches tall x 3 1/4 diameter. Held salt (and possibly spices) at the table. Special and early painted treen that is so hard to find.

More Information
NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORICAL ART: MASTERPIECE CARVED WALKING STICK.....SOLD

Eastern Woodlands, probably Great Lakes, ca. 1870, perhaps earlier. My enthusiasm for this elegantly carved horse is UNBRIDLED. Carved by a gifted Native American artist, chances are to honor his favorite horse. It is so unique that I remembered it instantly from years ago when offered by noted folk art dealer Marna Anderson. The graceful, stylized head appears to be from maple, with a gorgeous worn black stain. Retaining the original amber glass-bead eyes. The carving joined to the shaft at the position of a metal ring. A hole just below the ring held decorative attachments, like feathers. The shaft retains a reddish stain and the nubs from branches which add unexpected interest and character. The last few inches protected with a metal ferrule. The whole in superb rich patina. About 37 inches long. Comes with the floor stand as shown, but may also be wall hung. Thrilling that it has survived and in such amazing condition, this Native American wooden sculpture will bring joy each time it is seen. See Horse Imagery in Native American Art, within the book GREAT LAKES INDIAN ART, David Penny, that details the critical importance of horses to the Native American. Provenance includes Marna Anderson, Steve Powers, distinguished collector Peter Brams, Harris Diamant. and a private South Dakota collection.

More Information
Important Portrait Miniature by Rufus Porter Likely Portraying a Young Native American.....SOLD

Watercolor and pencil on paper in red-painted period frame, ca 1830. THE ARTIST: Rufus Porter (1792-1884) a celebrated artist, musician, teacher, inventor, and founder of Scientific American magazine. Painstakingly and crisply rendered in a manner for which Porter is acclaimed. THE SUBJECT (summary of research by the previous owner): Depicting a Native American man in the garb of an educated, socially established white man, extremely rare for a non-white in this period. The possible/plausible identity of the sitter is thus reduced to a very few. Two of the most likely candidates are Elias Boudinot and John Ridge, young leaders of the Cherokee Nation. Both were of mixed-race, raised among the Cherokees in Georgia, and educated at the Foreign Mission School in Cornwall CT. Both were fully literate and prominent in their Nation. In the 1830s they traveled widely throughout the United States, advocating in favor of the Cherokees and against the idea of "Indian removal". In the course of these travels they became well and widely known. Boudinot's founding of The Cherokee Phoenix, the first Indian newspaper published anywhere, added to his fame. (Both men eventually acceded to the US government's removal project, and for that were assassinated by tribal opponents, in Oklahoma.). Frame of about 6 1/4 inches x 5 1/4. Pictured page 34 "A LOVING LIKENESS, AMERICAN PORTRAITS OF THE 19TH CENTURY", The Gallery at Bristol-Meyers Squibb. Provenance: Ray Egan, private collection. .

More Information
IMPORTANT HISTORIC ANTIQUE SIGNBOARD. PATRIOTIC EAGLE AND SHIELD. SYMBOLS OF AMERICA.....SOLD

AMONG THE FINEST OF PATRIOTIC IMAGES KNOWN. Masterpiece folk art interpretation of the Great Seal of the United States of America centering rare signage for a US Marshal. Powerful. Dramatic. Confident. Inspiring. Brilliantly composed, rich with the visual vocabulary of America, like an illustrated time-capsule, revealing the deep pride and gratitude of early American's in their young country. Lansingburgh, New York, ca. 1853. Signed by the artist J. Follett. Painted on wood panel, for the appointment of John Mott as United States Marshall for the Northern District of NY State by U.S. President Franklin Pierce. The visual is glorious. The majestic eagle's talons firmly hold the bold red, white, and blue shield against his breast. E PLURIBUS UNUM is affirmed by his intense gaze as he supports the blue ribbon in his powerful beak. The roiling sun-filled clouds are a perfect backdrop to make the arrows (birth in warfare) and olive branches (hope for a prosperous, peaceful nation) stand out. Likewise, the gray-blue clouds, and dark wings contrast and frame the eagle's white head. The artist effectively rendered the US Marshal message, in gilt lettering against a sage ground, subordinate to and without competing with the eagle and shield. A thrilling signboard at the pinnacle of early American folk art. About 34 inches tall x 22 wide x 1/2 thick, with beveled edge. Condition: Unweathered as always presented indoors. Touch-up to scratches and lightly cleaned. Full condition report available. .

More Information
A Remarkable Rarity. Soulful Figural Gameboard.....SOLD

New England, ca. late 18th century. Probably maple, this folk art gameboard is distinguished by the carved head of a man, in profile, with the tied-back hair style fashionable in the 18th century. Perhaps functioning as a handle, the reductive carving portrays strength, amplified by the shadow it casts. The game area is lightly scribed with a grid of alternating squares of red and the natural color of the wood. The small size and handle suggest it was a travel board, maybe carried in a rucksack. Original surface. About 11 ¼ inches x 8 ½. Provenance includes: David Good (collection, not inventory), Steve Powers, Peter Brams, private collections. The best of authentic early Americana.

More Information
Exceedingly Rare. Miniature Leather Firebucket. With Receipt from Lillian Cogan.....SALE PENDING

Probably Newburyport, MA, ca. 18th century. Made in the manner of early leather drinking vessels and full-size firebuckets, this tiny piece (just 4 ½ inches tall not including the handle) is sewn from very thick leather and would surely hold water. Traces of paint with "NO 1" suggests that more than one were made, the purpose of which can only be speculated. Retains the original strap-leather handle with pressed decoration. Delightfully retains the sale of purchase from Lillian Blankley Cogan decades ago in Farmington, CT. An Americana rarity.

More Information
Sage Green Beehive Turned Bowl with Strong Turnings and Character.....SALE PENDING

Probably New England, ca. late 18th century to early 19th century. Thinly turned and lightweight. Appears to be maple. Retaining original thin green paint, this beehive example has unusually deep turnings, and, unlike others I have seen, some of the turnings were cut on angles to the horizontal, implying difficulty in controlling the slow turning iron blade. Typically the turnings are concentric and horizontal. Formed with a turned rim and raised foot, with chisel marks under the base where the block was removed after turning. Terrific structural condition with no cracks despite good shrinkage. Interior has a few drip spots. Diameter varies from 14 inches to 13 3/8. Height varies from 3 1/4 to 3 7/8 inches. Recently reacquired from a fine New England collection into which I sold it into years ago.

More Information
Small, Good Folk Art Portrait of a Handsome Boy on WOODEN PANEL

Probably New York State, dated 1846. Oil on wooden panel. I am fond of this little portrait. Simple. Direct. Quiet. The young boy, sensitively portrayed, seems a bit reluctant to have his portrait taken. Dressed in what appears to be a "skeleton suit" of a blue coat with white color, black bow tie, and lots of buttons. Holding a thin book perhaps for lessons. The back inscribed in pencil appears to read: Swe___? S. James, Jamestown, NY, 1846. Portrayed within a black-paint roundrel. Fine original condition with minor abrasions and very subtle bow to the wood. Unframed, shows square nail holes of a frame removed so soon after adding to the panel that it left no shadowing. Versatile small size of about 12 inches x 10. Shown below in roomlight and indirect sunshine.

More Information
Sensational Folk Art Hooked Rug on Linen.....SALE PENDING

Likely New Hampshire, ca. mid-19th century. The composition is centered by a pot of flowers, flanked by two birds on each side and two more smaller pots of flowers. The color palette incorporates shades of beige, red, browns, black, blue, and cream-white. Excellent condition. Visually appealing smaller size of just 31 1/2 inches wide x 16 tall. Mounted and ready to hang. Works equally well in an setting wanting color or quiet. Provenance: Exceptional New England collection of period furniture and folk art; Jan Whitlock. ASK FOR HIGH RES PHOTOS. Love it!..

More Information