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Fabulous "Black Glass" Sealed Mallet Bottle Dated 1732

England, with applied seal [WP 1732]. Beautiful color that is black in ambient light, and a deep green when backlit. Classic English V-shaped applied string lip. The bottle and seal are mint with expected rim imperfections. Stands about 7 1/2 inches tall. A sketch of a bottle with an identical WP 1732 seal is shown on page 83, Understanding Antique Wine Bottles, Dumbrell, amonst a grouping of sealed bottles from 1729-1733. Mantel quality!

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Soft Blue Painted Mortar and Pestle of Substantial Scale. First rate painted surface..SOLD.

Probably New England, ca. first half, 19th century. In early soft-blue period paint over traces of first yellow, with gracefully simple turnings that accentuate its unusually large size and depth. First-rate surface is dry and wonderful. Terrific condition with no cracks; shrinkage check (not damage) at waist that doesn't go through. Pestle is original to the mortar with matching paint. Heavy, appears to be maple. Stands about 17 inches to the top of the pestle; 11 1/2 just the mortar. A once utilitarian piece that use and history has elevated to a special object with sculptural character.

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Rare and Important Patriotic Horn Cup/Beaker.....BATTLE OF BUNKER HILL HERO GENERAL JOSEPH WARREN

Ca. 1775-1810. Horn. Carving of General Joseph Warren, one of America's greatest heroes who was killed at the Battle of Bunker Hill on June 17, 1775. Reverse carving depicts the patriotic shield and U.S. AMERICA. Cross hatching and swags decorate the rim.....Warren, a physician, was a leader in organizing Patriots in Boston, serving as president of the revolutionary Massachusetts Provincial Congress. Dr. Warren enlisted Paul Revere and William Dawes on April 18, 1775, to spread the alarm that British troops were marching to raid Concord and to arrest rebel leaders John Hancock and Samuel Adams. Warren also participated in the Battles of Lexington and Concord. Commissioned a Major General in the colonial militia shortly before Bunker Hill, yet rather than exercising his rank, Warren served in the battle as a private soldier under Israel Putnam, and was killed when British troops stormed the redoubt atop Breed's Hill. His death was immortalized in John Trumbull's famous painting (see photo). This piece has been in private collections, the most recent public showing being at The Museum of Fine Arts, Springfield, Mass, 1976, "Bicentennial Exhibit of Furniture, Paintings and Decorative Arts 1700-1876", and is pictured in the exhibition catalogue which is included with its sale. Carved Horn cups are done in a similar technique and manner as powder horns, yet POLITICALLY INSPIRED CARVED HORN CUPS ARE EXTREMELY RARE IN COMPARISON TO EVEN THE BEST POWDER HORNS. 3 7/8 inches tall. Excellent condition.

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Inspired Paint Decorated Pantry Box.....SOLD

Likely New England, ca. 1840-1850. Pine top and bottom with maple side bands. Mustard paint decoration on rich-red base color. Likely taking inspiration from theorems and still life paintings, this box celebrates growth and prosperity and abundance. The stylized incurved basket anchors the over-sized flower and foliage. The sides are also decorated, as is the edge of the lid-band. Superb structural condition, with joinery by cut nails and wooden pegs. Hand-plane tool marks are apparent on the lid, as are circular saw marks on the maples sides. Protective over-varnish is soft and mellowed. As fine of a period paint-decorated pantry box as I have encountered. About 8 1/4 inches in diameter at the lid; height 3 5/8.

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Outstanding Folk Art Hooked Rug

American, ca. 1st half, 20th century. Beautiful recumbent lion of a stylized, reductive form that is ever so pleasing and quiet. The lion rests against a variegated green background, bordered in shades of brown and green. This rug sold at Sotheby's in 1981, and was exhibited at the American Folk Art Museum exhibition in 1976 "The Great Coverup: American Beds, Tables, and Floors". Professionally cleaned and mounted. About 28 1/2 inches x 40. Photographed outdoors in shaded natural light. Provenance: Barbara Johnson, from her nationally respected collection of folk art.

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Terrific Early Diminutive Beehive Burl Bowl

American, Northeast, ca. 1780 to 1810. Ash burl. Sensational small ash burl bowl with dry, wonderful, untouched patina (never over-varnished). Robustly made yet refined. Subtle "beehive" turnings that embellished bowls made in the late 18th century. Great soft, worn, substantial feel in hand, one that you won't want to put down. Dark patina underneath. Just 6 inches diameter, and quite deep for the size at 2 3/4. Pictured with an ash burl scoop shown elsewhere. .

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Carved Burl Scoop

American, Northeast, ca. 1840. Fine example of a dry-goods scoop fashioned from highly figured burl. Front of bowl bevels. Robustly made. Dry pleasing surface. Just 6 inch overall length. Pictured with an ash burl bowl shown elsewhere. .

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Miniature Turned Bowl Retaining Original Paint History

Probably New England. ca. 1800. Appears to be pine. A miniature example with wonderful shrinkage and retaining early green and black paint over the first red wash or sizing, and remnants of an old oyster white in the interior. Very thinly turned, with chamfered rim and raised foot. Tight shrinkage checks in base. Diameter varies from 5 3/16 inches across the grain; 5 7/16 with the grain (1/4 inch shrinkage). Height varies from 1 5/8 inches to 1 15/16. Miniature turned wooden bowls were seldom made after the early 19th century as they were obsoleted by emerging ceramics and pottery, which were cheaper to make. Large wooden bowls continued to be made for many years as their ceramic equivalents would have been too heavy.

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