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Exceptional Oval Wallpaper Box.....SOLD

Northeast America, 19th century. Attached label reads: 6 oz TACKS Made for Lloyd, Supple, and Walton, Philadelphia, PA, a hardware store active from 1867 to 1889. Given the early form of the wallpaper box (ca 1825-1850), it is likely that the label was almost certainly affixed to an earlier-made box as an available container. The wallpaper box is exceptional, with beautiful polychrome paint decoration against blue ground, with stitched joinery at the interfaces. Newspaper lining references 'Maine' and the 'British', and the bottom is inscribed in ink with a reference that I can not decipher. The underside of the lid labeled in pencil: “Israel B Shreiner”. Very good condition. Just 2 3/8 inches long x 1 7/8 wide x 1 1/2 tall. .

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Scarce Blacksmith and Carriage Maker Painting.....SOLD

Probably Connecticut, ca. 1870-1880. Oil on canvas. The proud owners/workers standing before the Shea and McCarthy Blacksmithing and Jobbing Shop joined with the C.S. Gamwell Carriage Shop. As with most folk art paintings of PRIDE in town or business, the artist has depicted an idealistic view, with no disrepair or debris, and has effectively used rich primary colors of blue in the sky with puffy white clouds contrasted against the reds of the clothing and carriages. The scene shows workers with tools; the blacksmith with leather apron. Of note is the ramp alongside the carriage shop which would allow carriages or wagons to be pulled to the second level for repair, perhaps providing access to the undersides. Excellent condition, cleaned with minor retouch. Original stretcher and likely original frame. Unlined except for tack-edges. Sight size about 30 inches x 22. Overall frame size about 34 x 27.

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Lovely Teen-Age Girl, Prior-Hamblin School, Sturtevant Hamblin.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca. 1845. Oil on press board. Attributed to Sturtevant Hamblin (active 1837-1856). From her soft, pretty face and elegant lines, to her long fingers grasping the little book, this image has elements that advance the work well beyond that typically found in Prior-Hamblin School portraits. And using the device of the book, although many decades later, she successfully communicates to us her pride that she was literate in a time when many were not, particularly girls.....Remarkable UNTOUCHED original condition with no in-painting. Appropriate period, possibly original, frame. Overall frame size about 17 5/8 inches x 13 3/4......Hamblin was born into a Portland, Maine family whose business was ornamental painting. He resided in Portland with his sister, the wife of William Matthew Prior, and moved with them to Boston in 1840......Provenance: Bill Samaha, Stephen Score, Barbara Pollack, and a private collection for the last 20+ years.

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Dramatic Seascape by Jurgan Huge

Probably coastal New England, ca. 1870's. Oil on canvas. Attributed to Jurgan Frederick Huge (1809-1878). Huge was born in Hamburg yet by 1830 was a store owner in Bridgeport, CT. He was noted for ship paintings while incorporating vignettes of people and carriages, fanciful castles, and other fine details. This work boldly portrays a ship at risk on the rocks, watched closely by a couple standing precariously on the cliff, with more people/carriages/horses further within the scene. In sensational condition, housed in an early ripple gilded frame. The vertical format with frame dimensions of about 25 inches wide x 32 tall works well to decorate challenging narrow wall spaces. For reference: See Young America, A Folk Art History. Lipman/Warren/Bishop for good information about Huge including the cover painting. Provenance: Private collection; The Hill Gallery at the Philadelphia Antique Show, 2001.

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VIVID TWO-SIDED POLYCHROME AMERICAN GAMEBOARD.....SOLD

American, mid to 2nd half, 19th century, having square nailed grained picture-frame molding enclosing a Mill Game on one side, and American checkers (8 x 8) on the reverse. The mill side of strong color contrast having a bright bittersweet/red foundation with green and game-boundaries around a central green square. The checkers side having alternating black and gold squares with yellow lining. Very thin over-varnish with tight craquelure. About 12 7/8 inches x 12 1/2 inches (the difference being shrinkage across the grain). Its all about the color on this board, saturated and vibrant.

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Early Paint Decorated Box on Scarce Yellow Ground.....SOLD

New England, ca. 1800-1820. Original paint decoration on pine. Painted by a confident artist with free-flowing brush strokes, this box presents polychrome banding about sprigs, leaves, and berries, with the end-caps decorated with embellished fylfots. Cut-nail (square) joinery at the corners. Retains original snipe hinges. The box is in excellent structural condition without cracks. The lid is slightly domed from shrinkage. Decoration is in very good condition with edge wear as expected. About 11 inches long x 4 1/2 tall x 6 deep. The yellow ground and skill of the artist elevate this box.....Ex Ted and Carole Hayward; private collection.

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Good Early Compact Gameboard......SOLD

Probably New England, ca. 1840-1880. A thick pine board with applied pictured-frame molding joined by cut nails. Original black and red checkboard paint with sage gray/green border, the sage an effective enhancement. The back painted in the same black as the molding. Appealing small size of about 12 1/4 x 12 5/8 inches, the shorter size owing to shrinkage across the grain. Finely crazed very thin original overvarnish. From a fine New England collection of early Americana.

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“MR BOYD” (Jasper Miles). A Pair of Small Profile Portraits on Wooden Panels of an Attractive Young Couple.....SOLD

Likely Ohio, New York State, or Pennsylvania, ca. 1830-1840. For many years portraits by this artist were attributed to "Mr Boyd". Recent research has now identified “Mr Boyd” as actually Jasper Miles (1782-1849). See Magazine Antiques, July/August 2016 for the research by David Allaway, "Jasper Miles-19th c. Portrait Artist". As is characteristic with other examples by Miles, this pair is oil paint on wooden panels (probably poplar), the panels about nine by seven inches; they have an extraordinary attention to detail in the hair, which is drawn in miniaturist technique with a sharp-pointed brush; and there is a distinctive horn-shaped shading to the inner ear (look closely at the man’s ear). The man has an upright posture, and his far arm is suggested simply by a triangle. As with others of this period, the ovals have rough edges that would be concealed by a cardboard or églomisé mat, and one can see Miles’ color tests and/or brush cleaning outside the image area. Both sitters’ clothing shows subtle, extensive detail, while the lovely young lady’s portrait is enhanced by the splash of color from yellow ribbons in her lace bonnet and her salmon shawl. Note the gentleman’s tie in the form of a bow, his high collar, double-breasted coat, and swept-aside hair part, all high-style for this period. Excellent condition with exceedingly minor retouch to background. Frames are contemporary, made to fit these profiles several decades ago. Overall frame sizes about 11 inches x 9 1/4. Provenance: Long-time Private Collection from Peter Tillou. HAPPY TO EMAIL HIGH RES PHOTOS.

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Naive, Colorful, House Portrait with Animals

American, ca. 1870-1880. Oil on canvas. Probably New York State or Pennsylvania (given "Climax" on the windmill). Upliftingly rendered as a bright, sunny day with wispy clouds and stylized trees framing a large home, the path from which leading to a mustard-painted barn. A white painted fence separates the home from the fields in the background, helping to define this property as "our space" and the horse as a family member as he is inside the fencing. The artist pulls us in with large spaces of solid primary colors, and the "companionship" amongst the dog, horse, and bird. No in-painting save for a small (1 inch square) area in clouds. Never lined. Unframed. About 28 1/2 inches x 16 1/2. Provenance: Private collection; bought years ago from Don Walters.

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Early Valuables Box with Brass Heart Escutcheon

New England, likely Connecticut, ca. early/mid 19th century. Appears to be birch wood with dovetailed corners in original dry brown paint. Retains orginal brass bale, hinges, and escutcheon, and iron lock. Unusual form with low profile compared to the length, perhaps for safe keeping of documents or maps, and possibly for a ship. Newspaper article inside suggests this box came out the attic contents of the belongings of the Markham family and the whaler Frederick A. Weld in Guilford, Connecticut. Surface and structural condition are terrific, the box is crisp and very well crafted. The dark paint creates a strong contrast with the heart escutheon, enabling it to stand out even in low lighting. Undoubtedly given as a gift of affection. About 16 1/2 inches long x 4 1/2 tall x 8 deep.

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