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Brilliant Paint-Decorated Tinware Gooseneck-Spout Coffee Pot.....SOLD

Northeast America, ca. 1825-1840. Exceptionally beautifully decorated, and in equally impressive condition. Vivid red flowers. Color-contrasting mustard lobes, ferns, cross-hatching, and veining within green leaves. Free-flowing design that surrounds the pot, not confined within a spandrel. The black asphaltum ground remains in nearly full coverage without typical deterioration. Small rub to the back side. Original tiny brass finial. About 10 1/2 inches tall. Few examples are found as superb as this.

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SISTER'S BOND. Life-Size Double Portrait by Joseph Goodhue Chandler. 1848

Inscribed on the back: "Painted for Victoria A. and Virginia R. Wilder aged 6 years/by J.G. Chandler February 1848"..... Oil on canvas. The sisters portrayed wearing russet dresses and white pantaloons. Likely in the area of Hubbardston, Massachusetts. This portrait delightfully conveys the bond between the two sisters, embodied by their joined hands and shoulders forming a symbolic heart, in a manner that would be difficult to show as effectively even with the realism afforded by the then emerging availability of photography. And the color certainly could not have been matched by the monochromatic photographic images of the day. Note the sizeable house on the hill behind the girls, (likely their family home), the fishermen on the nearby pond, and the foreground flowers. Impactful scale! Sight size about 56 x 28 inches. Frame size about 66 tall x 39 wide. Paintings by Chandler are in many important antique and folk art collections, both private and institutional, the latter including the Shelburne Museum, the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Center, the New York State Historical Museum at Cooperstown, and the National Gallery of Art...... Provenance includes: Hirschl & Adler; Leigh Keno; pictured and discussed in the Highly Important Americana from the Stanley Paul Sax Collection, Sotheby's, January, 1998; prominent Midwest Collection.

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Profusely Carved Box Folk Art Box. Dated 1842.....SALE PENDING

Likely Massachusetts. Maple walled with pine top and bottom, with square nail joinery. Richly decorated including carved fingers and extensive chip carving, with the stylized-initials RB fully piercing the overlapping top side-wall layer, a beautifully executed and rare treatment. Inscribed about the wall: "1842 81 Y OLD" within a series of conjoined hearts. So the maker of the box was born in 1761, pre-dating the beginnings of the conflict with England. The lid is carved with a six-pointed star which encloses a period let-in slot for coins, the outer points decorated with the heads of cut nails. Remarkable rich dark patina, particularly given how hard it is for maple to take on this deep of color. Fine hairline on lid and expected imperfections. This box is stylistically and structurally closely related to a group of three ca. 1840 Massachusetts boxes discovered by author Derin Bray several years ago, and may be by the same hand. About 3 3/4 inches at the lid by 2 1/4 tall. Provenance: private collection; Elliott and Grace Snyder..

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CHILD'S-Size! Chippendale Slant Top Desk in Original Dry Paint.....SOLD

New England, ca. early 19th century. Birch and white pine. In an exceptional state of preservation including original very-dry painted first-surface, hinges, lock, and turned-wooden pulls on four-graduated long drawers. Fitted interior with a three-drawer arrangement over scalloped pigeonholes. Case, long-drawers, and interior-drawers all DOVETAILED. Drawer interiors and under-sides all in superb clean condition. The backboard and underside with strong patina and also superb. Stands just 18 3/4 inches tall x 16 3/4 wide x 11 deep. Very appealing form, size, and character. Discovered recently in a Boston attic. For the collector who covets early Americana in a high-state of originality.

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Dramatic Hewn Very-Early Treen Drying Rack.....SOLD

New England, ca. 18th century. One of my favorite and most unexpected objects I have been fortunate to represent. Hardwood (likely maple) in rich dark patina, retaining traces of period gray paint. Carved from the crotch of a tree, carefully chosen for its branching that flares sturdily and evenly. Each branch is hewn with tool marks readily visible (the subtleties difficult to show in photography), the back branch hewn-to-flatness to enable it to be used as a hanger. Likely used to dry candles dipped in beeswax or animal fats, the spread of the branches preventing sticking. An impressive 17 inches tall x 11 wide x 4 1/2 deep. The combination of form, tooling, patina, and paint create a remarkable visual that is not only unique yet also amplified by the shadows it casts. Provenance: Private collection; from personal long-time collection of Lew Scranton, CT dealer and collector.

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Painted Profile Portraits in High Relief with Textile and Paper Enhancement

Northeast, ca. 2nd quarter, 19th century. Paint, cloth, and paper on wood and/or wax within deep oval shadow boxes fronted with glass and brass. Suprisingly exceptional detailing. Had to be a more expensive process, and required more skill, than many other forms of portraiture. Typically three-dimensional profiles like these are carved from wax, yet the underside of the male portrait indicates that the carving, at least in part, to be wood. The carvings are well modeled. The gentleman in a beautiful high collared buttoned sage-green coat, with characteristic early 19th century forward brushed hair, a portion of the hair standing free above his face. The lady in a short-sleeved white dress tied at the high-waist by a real textile ribbon. Her bonnet, which appears to be cut paper topped with real ribbon, reveals a tuft of hair. The back of her work covered in paper, his uncovered showing white pine. Both have the museum accession numbers as acquired in 1959. Each about 6 3/4 inches tall x 5 1/2 wide x 1 1/2 deep. Excellent condition. Hers has paint brushup to the blue-paper background only, lower left, that may have lightened since first applied, otherwise they appear untouched. Private collection; deaccessioned in 2010 from the Campbell-Whittlesey House in Rochester, New York a Greek Revival home on the National Register of Historic Places, formerly serving as a museum operated by the Landmark Society of Western NY. High resolution photos easily emailed. High res photos show the nuances of a skilled artist.

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A RARE GEM: CHILD'S CHIPPENDALE CHEST.....SALE PENDING

An eye-witness to American Revolution history. In a size AND condition that we will probably not find again! New England, likely Connecticut area, ca. 1780. Cherry primary wood with white pine secondary. Original batwing brasses, and red-pigmented original dry varnish surface. HIGH RES PHOTOS AVAILABLE. Not a miniature, rather made for a child standing about the same height as a candle stand. In period a luxury. Molded top above four thumbnail-molded graduated drawers supported by a notched, square-bracket base. Fully dovetailed case and drawers; deeply chamfered and hand-planed drawer bottoms. Each drawer retains original lock, the presence indicating that the clothing or textiles enclosed within were valuable. Very clean condition inside and out. Back has beautiful dark patina. One very minor repair to one drawer-lip corner. Case width just 24 inches (25 ½ at the base). 27 3/8 inches tall. 11 ½ deep (at the base). Given the small size this chest has the flexibility to be placed almost anywhere, and can function as a lighting stand or side-table. Provenance: Fine private Southern Collection.

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"Hot Soda" Sign Board

American, ca. 1860-1890. Original polychrome paint on pine.....19th-century consumers were enthralled by the supposed healing properties of fizzy water. Grand devices were invented which made brewing and serving fizzy drinks easy. This trade-sign proudly declared that the vendor had fizzy water in the form of hot soda....the bright yellow ground color and bold black lettering with gold shadowing was intentionally obtrusive to attract customers from a distance......Angled corners with molding applied by cut nails. Signed by the maker/artist "Emery". Terrific crackled surface. An unusually energizing sign both in visual impact and in subject. About 72 inches long x 13 tall.

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Bold, Vibrant American Folk Art Rug.....SOLD

Probably New England, 19th century. The maker created a passionate work of art intended to uplift a room, to be a focal point of energy and optimism. She doubled-down on the rich red color by using several hues of red, the brightest within the woven basket from which flowers and vines rise. This basket and flowing-flowers composition was often meant to convey optimism and growth, more typically seen on theorems and watercolors. The reds are color contrasted by shades of yellow, blue, pink, blues and gray, all enclosed within a blue border. About 51 inches wide x 32 3/4 tall. Professionally mounted for hanging. See Kopp, "American Hooked and Sewn Rugs, Folk Art Underfoot" for reference. Provenance: Private New York collection.

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To Emeline: A Love Token with Skillfully Cut and Woven Heart in Hand

Probably New England, ca. mid-19th century. Watercolor and ink on wove paper with pin prick decoration and cut/applied paper. A scarce view into the manner of artistically expressing fondness in the mid-19th century. The written passages, addressed to Emeline (from the gentleman who appears to be 'Everett'), is eloquently written and crafted with precision. . The two segments begin with: "May thy path be all sunshine strewn with flowers". and "May thy slumber be tranquil thy dreams ever bright". The applied heart-in-hand is deftly cut. Note the red paper woven into the blue heart, the heart bordered with dotted decoration, and the surgically-cut sleeve. Presented in a period painted reeded frame. The frame about 9 inches tall x 8 3/8 wide.

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