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Delicate DIMINUTIVE Swing Handle Painted Bucket.....SOLD

Northeast, ca. early 19th century. Pine staves with likely ash bands. Original very dry bittersweet paint that may tend toward salmon in some lighting. Interior is unpainted in rich patina. Showing skill and precision in its design and craftsmanship, this little bucket is a rarity. Crisp, thin, button-hole bands hold the staves tightly, the maker chamfering the upper portion of the staves to give them an even thinner appearance. Two of the staves are longer such that they can hold the wooden-pegged buttons that secure the swing handle. This bucket was really used as evidenced by the paint wear, especially to the handle. Use is unknown, although traces of white residue suggest perhaps a dairy usage. Structural condition is exemplary (apparent replacement of just one wooden pin). The bucket weighs next to nothing which makes it survival even more impressive. Almost miniature JUST 3 7/8 inches to the top of the sides, 5 to the top of the extended staves holding the swing handle, diameter 5 3/4 x 6 (shrunk out of round). Choice form, small size, surface, condition.....sculptural historic art.

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State of Maine Paint Decorated Box

Maine, ca. 1830. Classic Maine paint decoration (on basswood) of swirling red and black graining, green border, and bronze-powder-paint medallion and urn with fruit. The box is dovetailed, and retains its original wire hinges. Clean interior with nailed dustliner. Colors very lively in sun or artlight. Structurally superb and tight, expected paint abrasions and wear. Nice small size at just 11 inches wide x 6 deep x 5 tall.

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Bearded Man Stoneware Bellarmine Jug/Witches Bottle....SOLD

Germany, ca. 1650-1700. Brown salt-glazed stoneware, with uncommon pewter mounted lid. These remarkable pieces may be the earliest German pottery known to have been owned and used in 17th century New England. German stoneware found its way to New England aboard many Dutch and English trading ships, as documented by numerous shards from 17th century archeological sites. They were made to store anything from water to spirits to vinegar and olive oil for use in taverns or homes. Since the 17th century these bearded-man jugs were given the English term "Bellarmine" based on the belief that the faces on them were visages inspired by the animosity toward Cardinal Roberto Bellarmino, a Catholic theologian know for his opposition to Protestism. These jugs were also used in the 2nd half of the 17th century as "witches" bottles, being buried beneath hearths and thresholds or in stream beds to ward off witchcraft, filled with clippings like human hair from the victim together with nails and pins, the nails often piercing a heart-shaped cloth from the victim's clothing. See the Archaeology of Ritual and Magic, Ralph Merrifield, for in-depth analysis. About 7 inches tall. Excellent condition with just an ancient hairline on the lid. Provenance: Private New England collection..

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Remarkable Decorated Leather Coin Purse 1827.....SALE PENDING

Probably Northeast, Pennsylvania to New England, possibly mid-Atlantic, dated 1827. Leather. Hand-stitched (not pin-prick) decorations of extraordinary fineness and precision. On the front are the initials JB and 1827 within a heart above a pinwheel. The back with conjoined hearts and a fylfot. The fylfot, which is seen on early materials from Pennsylvania, often in Connecticut, and up to Maine, seemed to symbolize differently depending upon region, ranging from warding off evil and witchcraft to the uplifting message representing the sun and rebirth and renewal. One sees the fylfot often on early Connectitut carved high chests in cherrywood. The hearts clearly communicate being made as a love token, mostly likely as a gift for an important occasion. The leather and decoration in sensational condition. Compare to leather key-baskets of mid-Atlantic/southern origin. About 4 /3 inches tall x 2 7/8 wide x ¼ thick. Rare early Americana in leather.

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Early Paint Decorated FRAME

New England, ca. 1820. Featuring mustard painted dots on a brown ground, over black. The frame houses a printed early family record that may have been original to the frame, and although attractive together, the value is in the rare paint decorated frame. About 10 ¼ inches x 7 7/8 wide.

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Very Fine Pair Hollow-Cut Silhouettes

Probably New England, ca. 1810-1820. Crisp, hollow-cut, backed with black silk, augmented with watercolor, ink and white pigment. Signed under bodies "William Graham" and "Agnes Graham". In what appears to be original stamped brass frames. Exemplary examples for skill, precision, and condition. Frame sizes about 5 1/8 inches x 4 3/8. See Silhouettes in America, 1790-1840, Blume Rifken, for referenc.

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Small, Good Folk Art Portrait of a Handsome Boy on WOODEN PANEL

Probably New York State, dated 1846. Oil on wooden panel. I am fond of this little portrait. Simple. Direct. Quiet. The young boy, sensitively portrayed, seems a bit reluctant to have his portrait taken. Dressed in what appears to be a "skeleton suit" of a blue coat with white color, black bow tie, and lots of buttons. Holding a thin book perhaps for lessons. The back inscribed in pencil appears to read: Swe___? S. James, Jamestown, NY, 1846. Portrayed within a black-paint roundrel. Fine original condition with minor abrasions and very subtle bow to the wood. Unframed, shows square nail holes of a frame removed so soon after adding to the panel that it left no shadowing. Versatile small size of about 12 inches x 10. Shown below in roomlight and indirect sunshine.

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Unique Red White and Blue Carved Looking Glass.....SOLD

Northeast, ca. last quarter, 19th century, likely inspired by the celebration of the first 100 years of America. Believed to have been made by a sailor, it is carved from one piece of wood in a voluptuous manner, with a marked three-dimensional presence representing a rope-twist. In a high state of originality with strong patina. Provenance: Purchased from Grace and Elliott Snyder by Dinah and Stephen Lefkowitz, of New York City and Old Saybrook, Connecticut. See the article about their remarkable collection in Spring, 2007 Magazine of Antiques and Fine Arts by Johanna McBrien, this looking glass being the lead pictured object and a favorite of Dinah (and now a favorite of mine). About 12 inches tall x 10 wide. .

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FEDERAL WATCH HUTCH WITH HEART WINDOW....SOLD

New England, ca. early 19th century. Cherrywood front panel, side walls perhaps cherry, perhaps another hardwood like beech. The backboard is possibly Cedar. In a very high state of originality with original snipe hinges, carved turnbuckle, "fragment" glass, the inner door cut to its shape, and most likely first surface. Joinery by tiny iron cut brads. Although known as a watch hutch to display a prized timepiece (and function as a clock), this hutch could have also been intended to display a choice piece of jewelry. The carved heart a sign of affection, likely given as a gift for an important occasion. About 8 inches tall at the case; 9 to the top of the backboard, x 6 wide x 2 1/2 deep. Private collection ex Sam Forsythe..

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Delightful Rare Howard Zinc and Copper Rooster Weathervane.....SOLD

Jonathan Howard Company of West Bridgewater, Massachusetts, circa 1854-1867. One of the earliest weathervane manufacturers in the United States, Howard and Company made some of the most detailed and distinctive weathervanes of the day. The characteristic Howard pleated tail is fashioned from copper, as are the cast legs and spurred feet, while the head and bulbous body are heavily cast from zinc. The copper elements show a complex verdigris green surface with traces of gilt, the zinc body with weathered patina. For a nearly identical example see Steve Miller, The Art of the Weathervane, page 142. The small size of just 13.5 inches long gives one the flexibility to put it almost anywhere. Casts a clever shadow. A rare form in sensational condition.

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