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Vibrant True Folk Art Theorem

New England, ca. 1830. For the collector seeking the exceptional. Paint on velvet. A "one-in-a-thousand" example with a composition from the mind of the artist retaining remarkably bold, bright, primary colors and accomplished gradation of paint. Set within a simple reductive lemon-yellow basket with green borders. Lights up even a darker space. Overall frame size about 17 1/2 inches wide x 14 tall. Provenance includes Steward Gregory; Claude and Alvan Bisnoff.

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Three-Finger Shaker Box in Blue-Green Paint. Period Decorated......SALE PENDING

Likely New Lebanon, NY, ca. 1840-1860. 3-fingered maple walled joined by copper nails, pine top and bottom. Retaining its original scarce blue painted surface. Stencil-painted with "SPICE." on the top (undoubtedly reference to how this box was to be used), and initialed 'EMC' within foliate decoration on one side, with more leaf/foliate decoration on the lid. Branded E.M. CLARK under the base. Clearly EM Clark was so proud of this box that he embellished it with paint and identifying it as his own. Structural condition is terrific with minor paint wear. About 8 7/8 inches long x 3 1/8 tall x 6 3/8 wide..

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OUTSTANDING Portrait of a HANDSOME Teen/Young Man.... Prior

New England, ca. 1835-1845. Oil on pressed board. Attributed to William Mathew Prior (1806-1873). Prior rendered a fun and outgoing likeness of a most confident, pleasant and fashionable sparkly blue-eyed teen/young man with straight hair ending in curls, his black coat and cravat revealing a fine yellow-patterned vest. The painting is bright and clear and appears to be in all original condition retaining its first over-varnish. No appearance of in-painting. Unobtrusive typical minor waviness to the board. Overall frame size about 19 inches tall x 14 1/2 wide; site size about 13 1/2 x 9 1/2. The period frame with cornerblocks is special and presents the painting exceptionally well. The frame bears the label of Montfort Coolidge (1888-1954) of Ogunquit, Maine, a famous artist and antiques dealer. See Artist and Visionary, William Mathew Prior Revealed, Fennimore Art Museum, for reference. A sensational example of Prior's work.

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A RARE GEM: CHILD'S CHIPPENDALE CHEST.....SALE PENDING

An eye-witness to American Revolution history. In a size AND condition that we will probably not find again! New England, likely Connecticut area, ca. 1780. Cherry primary wood with white pine secondary. Original batwing brasses, and red-pigmented original dry varnish surface. HIGH RES PHOTOS AVAILABLE. Not a miniature, rather made for a child standing about the same height as a candle stand. In period a luxury. Molded top above four thumbnail-molded graduated drawers supported by a notched, square-bracket base. Fully dovetailed case and drawers; deeply chamfered and hand-planed drawer bottoms. Each drawer retains original lock, the presence indicating that the clothing or textiles enclosed within were valuable. Very clean condition inside and out. Back has beautiful dark patina. One very minor repair to one drawer-lip corner. Case width just 24 inches (25 ½ at the base). 27 3/8 inches tall. 11 ½ deep (at the base). Given the small size this chest has the flexibility to be placed almost anywhere, and can function as a lighting stand or side-table. Provenance: Fine private Southern Collection.

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"Hot Soda" Sign Board

American, ca. 1860-1890. Original polychrome paint on pine.....19th-century consumers were enthralled by the supposed healing properties of fizzy water. Grand devices were invented which made brewing and serving fizzy drinks easy. This trade-sign proudly declared that the vendor had fizzy water in the form of hot soda....the bright yellow ground color and bold black lettering with gold shadowing was intentionally obtrusive to attract customers from a distance......Angled corners with molding applied by cut nails. Signed by the maker/artist "Emery". Terrific crackled surface. An unusually energizing sign both in visual impact and in subject. About 72 inches long x 13 tall.

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First-Class Diminutive Beehive Painted Bowl

New England, ca. 1780-1820. Original beautiful warm, rich red paint on maple. Exemplary form and crisply, expertly thinly turned. Molded rim over beehive sidewall supported by a well-defined foot. Significant out-of-round shrinkage with desirable "potato chipping". Perfect condition save a tiny quarter-inch split at the rim. Diameter 7 to 7 ¼ inches x 2 3/8 tall. A very fine example. Seldom have I seen a bowl of this small size with this excellent caliber of turnings. Shown in the last photo with a miniature chestnut bowl described in the following listing.

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Oh What a Fragment! Tour de force of Period Carving

Possibly Hudson River Valley or New Jersey, ca. 18th century. Poplar with traces of thin blue paint. Crisply, beautifully, and deeply carved including pinwheels, central fan, and quarter fans. Ends are dovetailed, and back-bottom has a dado-channel, so this fragment appears to have been a drawer front or architectural element. About 35 1/2 inches long x 6 wide x 1 ¼ deep.

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Folk Art Parcheesi Gameboard.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca. 1850-1880. Pine, with picture-frame molding joined by cut nails. The artist chose a very effective and desirable color combination of strongly contrasting colors of bittersweet and green, with a black ground, lining, and molding, and mustard cross-hatching in the center circle. An earlier game board, not one of the later examples that were more craft than art. Terrific natural patina to the back. Very good condition with expected imperfections from frequent play and a bow to the board within the frame. Applied moldings loose yet intact. Doesn’t appear to have ever been hung, yet easily mounted for hanging. Overall size of about 18 ½ inches square.

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Historically Significant “American Fancy” Interior Folk Art Painting of Mother and Son.....SOLD.

New England, ca. 1820-1835. Watercolor on wove paper. A rare glimpse into a New England country home showing seldom-seen American Fancy-Period interior features, including blue(!) moldings, yellow walls, and painted furniture in which the prevailing style valued imagination and creativity and COLOR. The young mother in full-length dress with lace-collar and bonnet seated on a red-painted bird-cage Windsor chair, her arm resting on a beautifully turned and similarly painted candle stand. Her son dressed in a blue “skeleton suit”, an outfit for small boys, popular from about 1790 to the late 1820s. Both the mother and boy conspicuously raise books, either symbolizing pride in their literacy, or perhaps they are having lessons. The frame of about 16 ¼ inches x 12 1/4 in dry black paint is period and likely original. Untouched with toning and creases. For reference, see American Fancy: Exuberance in the Arts, 1790-1840, Sumpter Priddy. Unknown artist, possibly by the same hand as that of the watercolor portrait on page 76 of “American Folk Painting” by Mary Black and Jean Lipman. Provenance: Long time private collection. A treasure rediscovered.

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Rare AMERICAN Courting Mirror. Original Glass and Red Paint....SOLD

New England, ca. 1780. Maple frame with white pine backboards (separate backboard for mirror glass and reverse-painted crest glass). Original very dry red paint and original mirror glass. Ship-lapped corner-joinery secured by wooden pins. The flat-arched crest centered by a reverse-painted glass panel. Richly patinated chamfered backboards. Glue blocks added long ago to back of crest for reinforcement of an ancient small crack in the crest-frame; another small ancient crack on extreme lower left of glass. About 16 inches tall x 10 wide. Few courting mirrors of American origin are known. Provenance: Private collection; formerly collection of Susan and Ray Egan who purchased it from Pam Boynton, who found it decades ago in Lunenberg, Massachusetts.

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