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Antique Scarce Authentic Pig Weathervane

Attributed to L. W. Cushing & Sons, Waltham, Massachusetts, authentic circa 1872-1900 (illustrated in Cushing catalogue 1883). Copper body and ears with verdigris surface. Cast zinc head with turned up nose, and curly tail. Diminutive size at just 17 inches length, height 11 inches. Superb surface. Far fewer pig weathervanes were made in the 19th century than eagles, horses, and cows, so relatively few authentic period examples survive today. The little size is especially desirable as it can be place anywhere. Excellent genuine period condition. Custom-made stand. References: ART OF THE WEATHERVANE, Steve Miller, pages 42-43 for a Cushing example of the same form; INCOLLECT/ANTIQUES AND FINE ART--American Furniture And Americana Shine at The 2015 Winter Antiques Show, David Schorsch and Eileen M. Smiles; FOLK ART MAGAZINE, Fall, 1998, page 12, ad for Christies, NY, January 1999 sale with a pig weathervane by the same maker as the lead item.....Provenance: Private New England collection..

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Bold, Bright, OUTSTANDING Theorem.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca. 1830-1840. Paint on velvet. Strong visual appeal, retaining brilliant, bright unfaded saturated colors and crisp, clean composition, the flowers bursting from the stylized basket with delightfully exaggerated in-curved sides, the basket resting on graduated steps simulating smoke decoration. Fancy theorems were painted in this period as gifts for friends or to brighten one's home, the still life often chosen as the subject as a symbol of abundance, and velvet for its soft appearance. Painstakingly rendered with exceptional skill by a talented artist. Period frame dimensions of about 22 3/4 inches wide x 21 tall. Remarkable condition; light toning. Provenance: Peter Tillou; private Northeast collection. Likely by the same hand as another that in the Chrysler Garbisch collection that sold at Sotheby's in 1974. Contact me for very favorable pricing.

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Shaker Four Finger Box in Rare MEETINGHOUSE BLUE Paint.....SOLD

Maine (Sabbathday Lake or Alfred), ca. 1830. Original authentic and rare Meetinghouse Blue paint, making reference to the original blue paint on the interior woodwork of the Shaker meetinghouse at Sabbathday Lake, as illustrated in Amy Stechler Burns and Ken Burns, The Shakers, Hands to Work, Hearts to God (New York: Aperture Books, 1987), p. 109. Shaker religious laws stipulated that Meetinghouses "should be painted white without, and of a bluish shade within". About 11 3/4 inches long x 8 1/4 deep x 4 3/4 tall. Period wear as shown, including smooth burnishing (from frequent handling) about the edges; structurally excellent with just a minor ancient split underneath. Beautifully carved tapered and chamfered fingers.

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Remarkable, Singular Folk Art Pin Cushion.....SALE PENDING

Northeastern America, likely Pennsylvania, ca 1830. Pasteboard body, weighty and robust in hand, covered with painted cut-paper appliques. The dyed-green fabric domed top covering a padded needle/pin cushion, with intricate woven-looped border. Relating to theorems of the period. The pots with billowing flowers symbolizing optimism and growth. Shows beautifully, even in low light owing to the color-contrast of the appliques against the ground, punctuated by the bittersweet example on the front. About 6 inches wide x 6 1/2 tall x 3 3/4 deep. Terrific condition with minor imperfections. Provenance: 30+ years ago from Ted and Carole Hayward in Maryland (before moving to NH). Shows beautifully!

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Hanging Knife Sharpening/Scrub Box. Tombstone and Lollipop Design.....SOLD

Northeast, probably New England, ca. early 19th century. Primitive, yet unusually slender and graceful for a scrub box, with original dry gray paint on pine or poplar with lollipop-top backboard supporting two sliding lid boxes, the lower "tombstone-shaped" held a sharpening stone or pumice. When used for sharpening the box was placed flat, then rehung after use. The top sliding-lid worn deeply into a "hollow" from countless knife sharpenings. Joinery by cut nails. Paint worn away on the lids of the boxes and has transitioned to a rich patina. Condition is good with ancient loss to the top left, and the upper box slides down without support, easily wedged by fitting a bit of paper within the dado. About 22 inches tall x 4 7/8 wide x 2 5/8 deep.

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Exceptional Early Applique' Decorated Stool.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca. 1830. Appears to be mostly wools. Hand-cut then hand-stitched to the black ground. The overflowing basket symbolizing optimism for growth and plenty as one sees in theorems of the period. Pictured inside the back cover of the very important textile collection: LIGHT FROM THE PAST, Early American Rugs from the Collection of Ronnie Newman. About 11 ½ inches wide x 8 deep x 6 tall. A remarkable survivor of early American folk art. A copy of the booklet included with purchase.

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Masterful 18th Century Slipware Loaf Dish

England, ca. mid to late 18th century. Beautiful example of a most desirable early ceramic form. Trailed and combed decoration with brown slip on a cream ground, the combing having depth that can be felt as one touches across the lines. Coggled or "pie-crust" rim. Robust and heavy in hand. About 12 inches long x 10 ½ wide x 2 ¼ deep. Provenance: private collection; Sam Forsythe.

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PAIR Still Life Paintings

American, ca. mid-19th century. Oil paintings (2) on wooden panels. Still lifes set against a dark ground, an unsual aesthetic, and presented within period black-painted frames. Muted presence in lower natural light; bolder presence under art light (EACH PAINTING SHOWN IN NATURAL ROOM LIGHT AND UNDER HALOGEN ART LIGHT). Lightly cleaned and with thin varnish. Frame sizes about 17 3/8 x 12 1/2 inches.

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Brilliant Portrait Miniature by the Talented Edwin Plummer.....SOLD

Massachusetts, Maine, or New Hampshire, ca. 1825-1835. Watercolor and gum arabic on paper. An author, lecturer, and astute business man, Plummer painted portraits often for family and friends. Finely detailed showing his delicate touch and his ability to capture a likeness with elegance and sensitivity, and to portray mood, not only physical attributes. The handsome brown-haired young man is fashionably tailored in high-collared coast with patterned embroidered yellow vest, high-white collar with pin, while resting on a red sofa, a setting seen in other Plummer portraits. Note the remarkable detailing. Presented in a period gilt frame that could be original. Frame size about 6 inchex x 5; sight size about 4 1/4 x 3 1/4. Superb! See Edwin Plummer and His "Portrait Likenesses", Deborah Child, Antiques and Fine Art, August, 2011 for reference.

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Carved Sliding Lid Candle Box with Lollipop Hanger

New England, ca. 18th/early 19th century, carved from one piece of pine or poplar in original dry and crusty charcoal black paint. The unpainted back has rich dark patina. Very small size suggests use for a few candles or perhaps spills. Period repairs to edge of box with cut nails. Just 11 inches tall x 2 3/8 wide x 2 deep.

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