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Portrait of an American Icon: The DRUMMER BOY

Northeast America, ca. mid to 3rd quarter, 19th century. Oil on canvas. Possible attribution to Joseph Goodhue Chandler. A most pleasing, bold, impactful rendering with rich color. The drummer boy clutches firmly the staff of an American flag, a strong patriotic expression. A rope-tensioned field drum and wooden sticks lie beside him. The "drummer boy" has always been an iconic figure in American history. He goes into battle with no weapon, only a drum with which to rally and encourage the troops around him. The drums were an important part of the battlefield communications with drum rolls used to signal commands from officers to troops. The life of a drummer boy appeared glamorous and as a result, boys would sometimes run away from home to enlist. The image of boy drummers were depicted in paintings, sculpture and poetry..... The stretcher retains remnants of an old label reading in part "...rear entra(nce) / NEW YORK/ ...YORK/ ANTIQUES EXPOSITION... ." The label is said to have referred to Albany at one time, indicating an exhibition in that city, possibly celebrating the Centennial of 1876. Frame size about 46 inches x 31. Excellent condition with very minor touch-up; contemporary frame. Provenance: Alice Braunfeld, Los Angeles, early 1980s; private collection. .

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Federal Iron Wafer"Press"

Northeast, ca. early 19th century. Iron. Expertly cast and finished by a skilled craftsman. A raised star within a larger star, the border rimmed by many small stars with beveled edge. For pressing a decorative pattern into wafers. Wafers were made in celebration of holidays, weddings, and other special events. Excellent condition/beautifully worked. About 6 inches long.

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A GREAT RARITY IN EARLY AMERICAN LIGHTING.....SOLD

New England, ca. 1800. ONE-OF-A-KIND. SOULFUL. OF REMARKABLE FORM AND ORIGINALITY HAVING NOT BEEN ON THE MARKET IN AT LEAST 40 YEARS. Ash and pine. Wooden-peg and cut-nail joinery. Vent holes form the initials 'L' and 'M', likely for whom the lantern was made. The design has a compelling folk art presence with a whimsical sideward bias: two side walls vertical, the others angled toward them. Unified by a dry red-painted surface resulting from more than two centuries of handling and exposure. The character is augmented by thin, wavy glass with expected pronounced distortions, held in place by un-headed cut nails. A small leather-hinged door provides access to the interior, its diminutive opening limiting a smaller hand to pass through, perhaps that of the lady 'LM'. The leather hinges are remarkable in their own-right, well worn yet undisturbed, and encrusted with paint and grunge. The carved turnbuckle is also original. The door opens to the first wrought iron candle socket, which pierces the lantern bottom and is held in place by a wooden wedge. It is significant that the original socket remains, as many lanterns had it replaced due to deterioration from heat and from candles being pushed in and stubs pried out. It also suggests, combined with the presence of the first leather-hinges, that this lantern had limited use in period, probably not an everyday object but rather withheld for special times. Eye-catching verticality and presence as it stands about 15 1/2 inches tall not including the wire hanger; base dimensions about 6 inches x 6 1/2.....Comparable painted treen lanterns are exceedingly rare. See lot 264, Weld Collection, Skinner Auction, August 13, 2000 for comparison. For the advanced collector pursuing the best. .

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Rare Baltimore Cobalt-Decorated Stoneware Flask

Baltimore, Maryland, ca. 1825. Tall, stately, boldly tapering flask with flattened sides, decorated on both faces with a large brushed cobalt-blue flower with fan-shaped blossom and cobalt-highlighted spout. Approximately 20 examples from Baltimore are known, some being attributed to maker David Parr. Excellent structural condition with no cracks. Stands about 9 1/2 inches tall, broad shoulders of about 5 inches wide tapering down to a base of 2 1/4 inches; about 2 3/8 thick. From a long time private collection. A beautiful gem!

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Magnificent Early Native American Art Form: Scarce Raised Handled Burl Bowl.....SOLD

Northeast Woodlands Indian, likely Iroquois, ca. late 18th/early 19th century. Ash burl in its original, very dry, complex unvarnished surface. Beautiful raised open carved handles. Broad and deep, oblong, measuring almost 20 inches long and across (19 1/4 inches long x 18 1/2 wide x 7 tall). Excellent condition. Sturdy, robust, weighty feel. See North American Burl Treen, Powers, pp 122-124 for other raised-handle Iroquois bowls.

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Paint Decorated Opposing Finger Box.....SOLD

New England, likely Massachusetts, ca. 1830. A nice example of green painted opposing finger box elevated considerably by the decoration of bittersweet flowers, which contrast beautifully against the green. Decoration is unquestionably period under early dry, craquelured over-varnish. I have only seen a handful of boxes that were paint decorated in period over the base color. About 6 1/4 inches long x 4 5/8 wide x 2 1/2 tall.

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Folk Art Portrait of Young Woman (Anastasia) by George Hartwell.....SOLD

Newport, NH, ca. 1839, oil on artist board, attributed to George Hartwell, the subject being Anastasia Colby Foster (b. 1816). This portrait remained in the family until 1976 when sold by Dorothy Foster. The attribution to Hartwell confidently assigned based on the two-tone lips and solid line in between. Anastasia is a particularly appealing subject with expressive eyes and full lips. The touches of the subtle necklace and hair ribbon are classy and elegant. In untouched exemplary original condition, presented in an excellent period red painted frame. Frame outer dimensions about 18 3/8 inches x 14 1/4 wide. Provenance: David Krashes from Wayne Pratt.

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Impressive Early Carved Eagle.....SOLD

Probably New England, ca. 1800-1850. Pine. In high-relief, this primitive carving retains an untouched rich dry natural patina. In 1782 the eagle was first introduced into American design as a symbol of strength and independence. From that time onward renderings of the eagle flowed into decorative arts, signs, furniture, etc. This early carving was meant to hang, not stand, is sizable enough to have had use as a sign, yet its specific use is uncertain. It would highlight a collection of early furniture and accessories with the commonality of strong surface. About 20 1/2 inches across x 20 tall x 2 deep.

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Dated HANNAH BROWN Needlework Pocket, American Revolution Period

HANNAH BROWN. Dated 1780. Primarily wool and silk. Of a small, delicate size for a pocket, this exceptional embroidered flame-stitch-variant pocket is rarer than similarly crafted pocketbooks. Representative of the best American needlework. Beautiful, labor-intensive textiles for personal adornment were amongst the most valuable possessions in the 18th century and a symbol of status. Probably made by Hannah for her own use, imagine her wearing this pocket at the finest gatherings. And like samplers, needlework accomplishments were often part of a young woman's dowry. Handsomely mounted for presentation yet also easily removed from the mount if desired. The pocket is about 7 inches wide x 10 1/4 to the top of the silk hanger. Mounting is about 12 3/4 inches x 9 3/4. Excellent condition with minor losses. Reference: "Worldly Goods, the Arts of Early Pennsylvania", Philadelphia Museum of Art, and "What Clothes Reveal", Baumgarten, Colonial Williamsburg. A beautiful object that would be unique in a modern or classical decor with the character of almost 250 years of history.

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Recently Discovered Portrait by Joseph Goodhue Chandler.....SOLD

Hubbardston, MA. Signed by Jospeph Goodhue Chandler and dated 1850. Oil on canvas. Having never been out of the family of descendent's of the sitter until recently found in Western New York State. A BEAUTIFUL COMBINATION OF A MOST DESIRABLE SUBJECT BY A NOTED CHILD ARTIST IN A HIGH STATE OF ORIGINALITY......An itinerant painter who was born in Massachusetts, Joseph Chandler was a typical folk artist who traveled painting portraits, but unlike many, he signed and dated his paintings on the backs of the canvases. He was especially skilled with children. He favored a deep blue dress behind one hand that held flowers, the other hand often holding a pet or object, in this case the ribbon of the child's hat. As with many folk art paintings, the image would seem to depict Miss Mary older than her three years of age. Children's portraits by Chandler are in fine museum and private collections. In ink, on back of canvas: Painted for Mifs Mary S. Gardner aged 3 years.....By J G Chandler , May, 1850.....On the stretcher: Hubbardston, Mafs Minor restoration, original frame and stretcher. Note the use of the "long S" in Miss and Mass, an early writing convention that slowly fell out of use after 1800.

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