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Deeply Carved Early American Busk.....SOLD

New England, ca. last quarter, 18th century. Crisply carved with stylized heart enclosing a pinwheel, the center with a swirling FYLFOT. The fylfot is occasionally seen on early New England decorative arts, usually coastal, believed to represent the sun and rebirth and renewal. The entire body profusely further decorated with geometrics and chip carving. Provenance: Exceptional New England collection. About 13 3/4 inches long. Soft buttery feel. Mint.

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Miniature Round Banded Box in Original Blue Paint.....SOLD

Likely Hingham, Mass., ca. mid to third quarter, 19th century. Original rich blue paint. Appears to be white pine top and bottom with maple side band. Finely crafted, with fingered bands joined by cut nails and square wooden pegs. Excellent structural condition with no cracks. Just 2 5/8 inches diameter x 1 ½ tall. Examples of these boxes in correct originally paint are coveted for stacking..

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Two Paint Decorated Oval Boxes with “Heart”....offered together.....SALE PENDING

New England, the larger likely Hingham, ca. 1820-1840. Each with dry painted surfaces featuring hearts, so likely given as gifts at an event such as birthday, wedding, or anniversary. The larger box, with opposing fingers, has incised lines which laid out a “checkerboard” pattern with dotting in the background behind to connected hearts conjoined by a larger heart. The smaller box has interlocking-finger joinery decorated by a single heart defined by black paint. Each with that elusive antique "soulfull" character. The larger about 5 1/2 inches long, the smaller 3 1/4. Years ago gifted from Ted to Carol Hayward..

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The HEART-AND-HAND ARTIST: Calling Card for Lorenzo F. Conner

New England, possibly Fairfield, Maine, ca. 1830-1851. Attributed to the HEART-AND-HAND ARTIST, possibly Samuel Lawhead. Ink and watercolor on paper. Calling cards, which included only the caller's name, were customary in this period to be presented to the host or hostess on formal visits. Many houses then kept these cards in a basket as a record of visitors. Most calling cards were simply printed, yet those by the heart-in-hand artist are beautifully hand-drawn and personalized, suggesting they were made for special events or persons. This terrific example remains in superb condition with bright, strong colors; a crisp rendering. Intriguingly the bottom of the card bears a fingerprint. The card itself is about 4 1/8 inches long x 3 tall. Presented in a vinegar painted frame, which is not period yet shows the work very well, is about 6 ¾ x 5 ¾ inches. See Expressions of Innocence and Eloquence, page 90 for a similar piece.

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Lovely Teen-Age Girl, Prior-Hamblin School, Sturtevant Hamblin.....SOLD

New England, ca. 1845. Oil on press board. Attributed to Sturtevant Hamblin (active 1837-1856). From her soft, pretty face and elegant lines, to her long fingers grasping the little book, this image has elements that advance the work well beyond that typically found in Prior-Hamblin School portraits. And using the device of the book, although many decades later, she successfully communicates to us her pride that she was literate in a time when many were not, particularly girls.....Remarkable UNTOUCHED original condition with no in-painting. Appropriate period, possibly original, frame. Overall frame size about 17 5/8 inches x 13 3/4......Hamblin was born into a Portland, Maine family whose business was ornamental painting. He resided in Portland with his sister, the wife of William Matthew Prior, and moved with them to Boston in 1840......Provenance: Bill Samaha, Stephen Score, Barbara Pollack, and a private collection for the last 20+ years.

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Special Oval Signed and Dated Butter Print.....SOLD

Pennsylvania, likely area near Ephrate/Lititz. Signed J. Huhn, dated 1853. Appears to be maple with terrific color. Very deeply carved tulip flanked by flowers or stars. Turned handle joined by nails about the perimeter. Oval body with chamfered edges. Very similar, and likely by the same hand, as the one pictured in " Butter Prints and Molds," by Paul Kindig, pg. 70 Figure 51 a & 51b. About 6 1/8 inches long x 3 3/4 wide x 3 tall including the handle. Provenance: private New England collection; David Wheatcroft. They don’t get much better than this.

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Figured Cutlery Tray

Probably Northeast, ca. 1820-1850. In a highly figured wood that may be walnut burl or curly birch. Square nail joinery including the mitered corners and under-base. Early over-varnish. "High country" being of country form yet made from expensive wood. About 12 7/8 inches long x 7 3/8 wide x 4 3/8 to the top of the handle. Good sturdy condition.

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Folky Young Man Portrait

New England, ca. 1820-1840. Oil on canvas. A most handsome young man (that FACE!) with characteristics that we folk art collectors love. Portraits can be so naive that there is little artistic skill, or so academic that they require an equally academic, formal setting. Yet this portrait falls on the "sweet-spot" of that naive-to-academic continuum. His face is mostly without shadow leading to stylized-combed hair presenting like waves. His black coat and white shirt/collar, and simple background combined with his confident gaze give this painting a clean and uncomplicated aesthetic. It has survived in sensational condition. About 26 inches tall x 24 wide. Gilded frame-liner appears original. He's terrific.

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Carved Folk Art Polychrome Walking Stick.....SOLD

Likely Southern US, ca. late 19th century. Graceful carving. ITS ALL ABOUT THE PAINT. Eye popping and dazzling patterning. Avant-garde for the period in which it was made. Superb condition with scattered wear. About 38 inches long. May rest on a flat surface, or be positioned vertically (comes with a wall mount). Provenance: Southern Collection; David Wheatcroft. By the same hand as a similar cane exhibited at the Brookln Musuem and Los Angeles Museum of Art in 1976, the seminal exhibition of American folk sculpture. Happy to send photos from that exhibition.

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Important William and Mary Lighting Stand in Cherry and Cherry-Burl.....SOLD

Northeast America, likely New England, possibly Connecticut River Valley, ca. 1720-1740. Baluster-turned double candle holder moveable on cherry-wood column supported by a bold exceedingly rare cherry-burl base with ring-turned top and incised lines. The column is surmounted by an acorn finial, a symbol of Huguenot-craftsman and representing many positive attributes, including: life, power, longevity, new growth, good luck, and as a heraldic symbol “independence to its bearer”, and “great oaks from little acorns grow”. Retains period candles. Stands a majestic 29 inches tall. Pictured/described “North American Burl Treen”, Powers, 2005. Provenance: About 1970-2002 Clarke Garrett; then David Good. HAPPY TO EMAIL HIGH RES PHOTOS.

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