Home  >  Antiques
Antiques
CHILD'S-Size! Chippendale Slant Top Desk in Original Dry Paint

New England, ca. early 19th century. Birch and white pine. In an exceptional state of preservation including original very-dry painted first-surface, hinges, lock, and turned-wooden pulls on four-graduated long drawers. Fitted interior with a three-drawer arrangement over scalloped pigeonholes. Case, long-drawers, and interior-drawers all DOVETAILED. Drawer interiors and under-sides all in superb clean condition. The backboard and underside with strong patina and also superb. Stands just 18 3/4 inches tall x 16 3/4 wide x 11 deep. Very appealing form, size, and character. Discovered recently in a Boston attic. For the collector who covets early Americana in a high-state of originality.

More Information
Paint Decorated Oval Fingered Box.....SOLD

Northeast America, ca. mid-19th century. Pine top and bottom with maple sides. Nicely shaped fingers joined with iron cut nails. Blue ground painted surface with red and yellow striped-border decoration. Old over-varnish on the side walls with sheen, while the the top surface is dry where little of the over-varnish remains or was never added. Superb structural condition; minor paint wear. About 8 3/4 inches long x 6 1/2 wide x 3 1/2 tall.

More Information
A RARE GEM: CHILD'S CHIPPENDALE CHEST.

An eye-witness to American Revolution history. In a size AND condition that we will probably not find again! New England, likely Connecticut area, ca. 1780. Cherry primary wood with white pine secondary. Original batwing brasses, and red-pigmented original dry varnish surface. HIGH RES PHOTOS AVAILABLE. Not a miniature, rather made for a child standing about the same height as a candle stand. In period a luxury. Molded top above four thumbnail-molded graduated drawers supported by a notched, square-bracket base. Fully dovetailed case and drawers; deeply chamfered and hand-planed drawer bottoms. Each drawer retains original lock, the presence indicating that the clothing or textiles enclosed within were valuable. Very clean condition inside and out. Back has beautiful dark patina. One very minor repair to one drawer-lip corner. Case width just 24 inches (25 ½ at the base). 27 3/8 inches tall. 11 ½ deep (at the base). Given the small size this chest has the flexibility to be placed almost anywhere, and can function as a lighting stand or side-table. Provenance: Fine private Southern Collection.

More Information
"Hot Soda" Sign Board

American, ca. 1860-1890. Original polychrome paint on pine.....19th-century consumers were enthralled by the supposed healing properties of fizzy water. Grand devices were invented which made brewing and serving fizzy drinks easy. This trade-sign proudly declared that the vendor had fizzy water in the form of hot soda....the bright yellow ground color and bold black lettering with gold shadowing was intentionally obtrusive to attract customers from a distance......Angled corners with molding applied by cut nails. Signed by the maker/artist "Emery". Terrific crackled surface. An unusually energizing sign both in visual impact and in subject. About 72 inches long x 13 tall.

More Information
Bold, Vibrant American Folk Art Rug.....SALE PENDING

Probably New England, 19th century. The maker created a passionate work of art intended to uplift a room, to be a focal point of energy and optimism. She doubled-down on the rich red color by using several hues of red, the brightest within the woven basket from which flowers and vines rise. This basket and flowing-flowers composition was often meant to convey optimism and growth, more typically seen on theorems and watercolors. The reds are color contrasted by shades of yellow, blue, pink, blues and gray, all enclosed within a blue border. About 51 inches wide x 32 3/4 tall. Professionally mounted for hanging. See Kopp, "American Hooked and Sewn Rugs, Folk Art Underfoot" for reference. Provenance: Private New York collection.

More Information
To Emeline: A Love Token with Skillfully Cut and Woven Heart in Hand

Probably New England, ca. mid-19th century. Watercolor and ink on wove paper with pin prick decoration and cut/applied paper. A scarce view into the manner of artistically expressing fondness in the mid-19th century. The written passages, addressed to Emeline (from the gentleman who appears to be 'Everett'), is eloquently written and crafted with precision. . The two segments begin with: "May thy path be all sunshine strewn with flowers". and "May thy slumber be tranquil thy dreams ever bright". The applied heart-in-hand is deftly cut. Note the red paper woven into the blue heart, the heart bordered with dotted decoration, and the surgically-cut sleeve. Presented in a period painted reeded frame. The frame about 9 inches tall x 8 3/8 wide.

More Information
Hand-Cut Folk Art Love Tokens (Sold separately)

Northeast America, 19th century. The first showing a pair of hands, cut from paper, ornamented with finely crafted rings, cuffs, and emblems in GOLD FOIL. At the top is are beautifully woven conjoined hearts of paper and foil. With blue paper background. Frame size about 10 1/4 inches tall x 8 wide......The second of a paper cutting with four hands, embellished by blue silk and a wreath of plaited hair. Set within a grained painted frame of about 5 1/2 inches tall x 4 1/2 wide.

More Information
Silk Needlework Double-Memorial by a Massachusetts Schoolgirl.....SOLD

Ca. 1806 to 1815. WROUGHT BY AVILDA SAYLES FRANKLIN. WRENTHAM ACADEMY. Day's Academy (aka Wrentham Academy) was a former institute in Wrentham, Massachusetts that existed between 1806 and 1875 when it became the site of Wrentham's High School. Avilda, based on genealogical records, was born in Franklin, MA in 1787, so would have been in her late teens in the early 19th century when she embroidered this work of art and history. The double-memorial celebrates two of Avilda's siblings: Nabby Sayles who died at 3 years of age in 1799; and Lavinia Sayles, aged 7, who died in 1786. Another silk memorial from the Wrentham Academy (with a Henry Francis DuPont provenance) that sold at Northeast Auctions in 2005, has a strikingly similar composition with a young woman in Empire dress beside a plinth with double urns with arching willow tree with background hills. Avilda's memorial needlework picture was one of the expected accomplishments of a young cultured girl in early America. It is a lovely, thoughtful, and elegant work of art. Original frame about 24 inches x 20. In excellent condition with minor toning, and losses to the extreme upper left and lower right of the black corners of the eglomise panel. Happy to email high res photos.

More Information
Very Special Love Token

New England, ca. 1820-1840. Beautifully executed fine cuttings, of paper, of a pair of love birds resting on a heart-in-hand, surrounded by an oval of plaited hair, all set upon a blue-silk backing. Presented in a deeply carved and polychrome frame which is likely the original to the artwork. Frame size of just 4 ¾ inches tall x 3 ½ wide x ¾ thick. Private collection for the last 15-20 years, having come from another private collection before that.

More Information
Important Portrait of Samuel Gore, BOSTON TEA PARTY....PATRIOT and SON OF LIBERTY

Boston, ca. 1796, painted by Christian Gullager (1759-1826). Oil on canvas. As a member of the Sons of Liberty, Gore participated in several well-known events in pre-revolutionary Boston, including that of February, 1770, in which the Sons of Liberty taunted a known Tory and informer to the British: Ebenezer Richardson. They cornered Richardson at his home and hurled insults and garbage. Richardson responded by firing from his doorway, killing eleven year old Christopher Seider, and severely wounding Gore, who was treated by Dr Joseph Warren, a leader of the revolution movement who was killed at the Battle of Bunker Hill. Gore also participated in the Boston Tea Party with Paul Revere and others on Dec. 16, 1773, and the stealing of the canon from the gun-house in Boston. Gore served briefly in the Revolutionary War under General John Hancock. Probably painted circa 1796 after his father's passing to commemorate his new standing as sole owner of his merchant business that provided "colors" and "patterns" to Boston. MUCH MORE BACKGROUND IS AVAILABLE ON SAMUEL GORE.....The artist, Christian Gullager, immigrated to Newburyport, MA in the mid 1780's. By 1789 he is listed as a portrait painter in the Boston directory. From this time to his departure in late 1796 or early 1797 he was known as one of the two best portrait painters in Boston. The Samuel Gore portrait is typical of the artists in this period in Boston period with its dashy impressionistic style. For information see "Christian Gullager, Portrait Painter to Federal America" by Marvin Sadik, 1976, which is the catalogue for an exhibition of his works at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC……Fine condition with minor retouch and is mounted in a ca. 1840 frame.

More Information