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Early Shaker Oval Box in True MEETING HOUSE BLUE.....SOLD

Alfred or Sabbathday Lake, Maine, ca. 1830. Maple walled with pine top and bottom with copper tacks. Original MEETING HOUSE BLUE paint, the scarcest color in oval Shaker boxes (red most common, then yellow, green, then meetinghouse blue). Known as "meeting house blue" as it was used in the meeting house woodwork and furnishings, with color created from a mixture of Prussian Blue and lead-white in an oil-binder (like Linseed oil). Structurally superb condition with period paint wear. About 7 3/4 inches long x 3 3/8 tall x 5 3/8 wide. Provenance: Acquired by collectors from Olde Lyme, CT in the 1940's.

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Sensational Lidded Basket in Original Red Paint.....SALE PENDING

Northeast America, ca. 19th century. Hand-cut from what appears to be ash or chestnut. Impressive size and appearance, the exterior and under-lid retaining original thin red paint. Beautifully woven and in superb condition. About 15 1/2 inch diameter at the lid x 10 tall. Provenance: Private Midwest collection; Susie Berman, New Hampshire.

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Important Portrait of Samuel Gore, BOSTON TEA PARTY....PATRIOT and SON OF LIBERTY

Boston, ca. 1796, painted by Christian Gullager (1759-1826). Oil on canvas. As a member of the Sons of Liberty, Gore participated in several well-known events in pre-revolutionary Boston, including that of February, 1770, in which the Sons of Liberty taunted a known Tory and informer to the British: Ebenezer Richardson. They cornered Richardson at his home and hurled insults and garbage. Richardson responded by firing from his doorway, killing eleven year old Christopher Seider, and severely wounding Gore, who was treated by Dr Joseph Warren, a leader of the revolution movement who was killed at the Battle of Bunker Hill. Gore also participated in the Boston Tea Party with Paul Revere and others on Dec. 16, 1773, and the stealing of the canon from the gun-house in Boston. Gore served briefly in the Revolutionary War under General John Hancock. Probably painted circa 1796 after his father's passing to commemorate his new standing as sole owner of his merchant business that provided "colors" and "patterns" to Boston. MUCH MORE BACKGROUND IS AVAILABLE ON SAMUEL GORE.....The artist, Christian Gullager, immigrated to Newburyport, MA in the mid 1780's. By 1789 he is listed as a portrait painter in the Boston directory. From this time to his departure in late 1796 or early 1797 he was known as one of the two best portrait painters in Boston. The Samuel Gore portrait is typical of the artists in this period in Boston period with its dashy impressionistic style. For information see "Christian Gullager, Portrait Painter to Federal America" by Marvin Sadik, 1976, which is the catalogue for an exhibition of his works at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC……Fine condition with minor retouch and is mounted in a ca. 1840 frame.

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Watercolor Portrait Miniature of a Lovely Little Girl with Cat by HENRY WALTON.....SOLD

Probably Ithaca, New York, 1836. Watercolor on paper. Labeled at the bottom on separate paper: "Nancy Ann Halsey Age 1 Yr. 1 Mth. Painted by Henry Walton 1836". Although only 1 year old at the time, Walton rendered Nancy as an older child, an approach often seen by folk artists in this period. Sweet, blue-eyed Nancy stands alongside a painted child's-size Windsor chair and her cat, flanked by a drop-leaf dining table with table rug. The bright orange of her dress and the bold, colorful floor covering give us a look into the design and colors preferred during the American Fancy Period. Note the tiny book held in her left hand, implying the importance placed on reading by her parents. Walton created this lasting image of little Nancy with exceptional skill and sensitivity, prior to the availability of photography. Henry Walton (1820-1873), lithographer and painter. Born in England in 1820. Walton immigrated to Ithaca, NY in 1836 and worked for the lithography firm of Stone and Clark. Although a largely self-taught artist, he is noted for his artistic sophistication in miniatures, landscapes, and portraits. In 1849 he joined the Gold Rush to California. Remains in bright and colorful condition. Faint shadow lines from previous framing on the extreme edges. Presented in a dry, black-painted period frame. Frame size about 8 3/4 inches x 6 1/2. On page 29 of HENRY WALTON, 19th Century American Artist, Ithaca College Museum of Art, there is a similar portrait of Herman Halsey, rendered on the same carpet, probably the brother of Nancy, and also painted in 1836.

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Early Lighting: Whitesmithed Kettle Light (Lamp)

Northeast America, ca. late 18th century. Iron. A wick would be place inside the kettle filled with animal fats or other oils to provide an inexpensive and readily available source of light. Whitesmiths had more refined iron and steel working skills than the blacksmith, with the latter primarily focused on more coarse utilitarian needs such as horse-shoes, nails, and pots. The whitesmith was employed to complete more aesthetically demanding or intricate work and finishing. This kettle light shows those skills of the whitesmith, from the pointed feet on quad-base with raised spines on the legs, to the central column knop, and the rather sophisticated tilting mechanism of the bowl. The light is tall and stately and unusually sophisticated for the form, the broad base (peened to the column) providing good stability. About 10 inches tall. Excellent condition. .

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Early Blacksmith-made Rushlight/Chamberstick....SALE PENDING

Likely New England, ca. 18th century. A very scarce form, this diminutive rushlight has a thumb-hold for use as a chamberstick to be carried from room to room. Constructed entirely in iron, the sturdy base supports a square-column that terminates in jaws to clamp burning rush, one-half the jaws joined by rose-head-like peening and terminating in a swirled counter-weight. Sensational, heavily pitted surface. Stands just 5 3/4 inches tall.

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Two Paint Decorated Oval Boxes with “Heart”....offered together.....SALE PENDING

New England, the larger likely Hingham, ca. 1820-1840. Each with dry painted surfaces featuring hearts, so likely given as gifts at an event such as birthday, wedding, or anniversary. The larger box, with opposing fingers, has incised lines which laid out a “checkerboard” pattern with dotting in the background behind to connected hearts conjoined by a larger heart. The smaller box has interlocking-finger joinery decorated by a single heart defined by black paint. Each with that elusive antique "soulfull" character. The larger about 5 1/2 inches long, the smaller 3 1/4. Years ago gifted from Ted to Carol Hayward..

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The HEART-AND-HAND ARTIST: Calling Card for Lorenzo F. Conner

New England, possibly Fairfield, Maine, ca. 1830-1851. Attributed to the HEART-AND-HAND ARTIST, possibly Samuel Lawhead. Ink and watercolor on paper. Calling cards, which included only the caller's name, were customary in this period to be presented to the host or hostess on formal visits. Many houses then kept these cards in a basket as a record of visitors. Most calling cards were simply printed, yet those by the heart-in-hand artist are beautifully hand-drawn and personalized, suggesting they were made for special events or persons. This terrific example remains in superb condition with bright, strong colors; a crisp rendering. Intriguingly the bottom of the card bears a fingerprint. The card itself is about 4 1/8 inches long x 3 tall. Presented in a vinegar painted frame, which is not period yet shows the work very well, is about 6 ¾ x 5 ¾ inches. See Expressions of Innocence and Eloquence, page 90 for a similar piece.

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Early Fragment Mirrors-Offered Separately.....ALL SALE PENDING

Northeast America, likely New England. HAPPY TO EMAIL HIGH RES PHOTOS! ......................FAR LEFT: Ca. late 18th century. Original paint. In bright light appears as a dark, oxidized “Windsor Green”. Appears to be planed with a “toothed plane”. Untouched condition, very solid in hand. Glass is sensational. About 4 inches tall x 3 wide.......... MIDDLE: Queen Anne, ca. mid to late 18th century. Crest surmounted by carved ears. Very organic shape. Mitered corners. Back covered with very early paper. Original glass survives with about half of its silvering. About 3 3/4 inches tall x 2 wide.......... FAR RIGHT: Ca. late 18th century. Tombstone-shaped glass with traces of green paint. Original glass that has lost much of it silvering. Chamfered edges. Sawn backboard. About 3 5/8 inches tall x 2 3/4 wide. .

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Special Oval Signed and Dated Butter Print.....SOLD

Pennsylvania, likely area near Ephrate/Lititz. Signed J. Huhn, dated 1853. Appears to be maple with terrific color. Very deeply carved tulip flanked by flowers or stars. Turned handle joined by nails about the perimeter. Oval body with chamfered edges. Very similar, and likely by the same hand, as the one pictured in " Butter Prints and Molds," by Paul Kindig, pg. 70 Figure 51 a & 51b. About 6 1/8 inches long x 3 3/4 wide x 3 tall including the handle. Provenance: private New England collection; David Wheatcroft. They don’t get much better than this.

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