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Lovely Teen-Age Girl, Prior-Hamblin School, Sturtevant Hamblin.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca. 1845. Oil on press board. Attributed to Sturtevant Hamblin (active 1837-1856). From her soft, pretty face and elegant lines, to her long fingers grasping the little book, this image has elements that advance the work well beyond that typically found in Prior-Hamblin School portraits. And using the device of the book, although many decades later, she successfully communicates to us her pride that she was literate in a time when many were not, particularly girls.....Remarkable UNTOUCHED original condition with no in-painting. Appropriate period, possibly original, frame. Overall frame size about 17 5/8 inches x 13 3/4......Hamblin was born into a Portland, Maine family whose business was ornamental painting. He resided in Portland with his sister, the wife of William Matthew Prior, and moved with them to Boston in 1840......Provenance: Bill Samaha, Stephen Score, Barbara Pollack, and a private collection for the last 20+ years.

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Dramatic Seascape

Probably coastal New England, ca. 1870's. Oil on canvas. Attributed to Jurgan Frederick Huge (1809-1878). Huge was born in Hamburg yet by 1830 was a store owner in Bridgeport, CT. He was noted for ship paintings while incorporating vignettes of people and carriages, fanciful castles, and other fine details. This work boldly portrays a ship at risk on the rocks, watched closely by a couple standing precariously on the cliff, with more people/carriages/horses further within the scene. In sensational condition, housed in an early ripple gilded frame. The vertical format with frame dimensions of about 25 inches wide x 32 tall works well to decorate challenging narrow wall spaces. For reference: See Young America, A Folk Art History. Lipman/Warren/Bishop for good information about Huge including the cover painting. Provenance: Private collection; The Hill Gallery at the Philadelphia Antique Show, 2001.

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VIVID TWO-SIDED POLYCHROME AMERICAN GAMEBOARD.....SOLD

American, mid to 2nd half, 19th century, having square nailed grained picture-frame molding enclosing a Mill Game on one side, and American checkers (8 x 8) on the reverse. The mill side of strong color contrast having a bright bittersweet/red foundation with green and game-boundaries around a central green square. The checkers side having alternating black and gold squares with yellow lining. Very thin over-varnish with tight craquelure. About 12 7/8 inches x 12 1/2 inches (the difference being shrinkage across the grain). Its all about the color on this board, saturated and vibrant.

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Cooper-Made Field Keg in Strong Early Green Paint.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca. late 18th/early 19th century. Early dry green paint with four wrought iron bands joined by large rosehead fasteners that secure the staved side-walls. Bung hole has early carved treen stopper. Larger size would suggest militia use for carrying water. About 10 1/2 inches tall x 6 diameter. Very solid and robust in hand. From a private Massachusetts collection.

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Folky Young Man Portrait

New England, ca. 1820-1840. Oil on canvas. A most handsome young man (that FACE!) with characteristics that we folk art collectors love. Portraits can be so naive that there is little artistic skill, or so academic that they require an equally academic, formal setting. Yet this portrait falls on the "sweet-spot" of that naive-to-academic continuum. His face is mostly without shadow leading to stylized-combed hair presenting like waves. His black coat and white shirt/collar, and simple background combined with his confident gaze give this painting a clean and uncomplicated aesthetic. It has survived in sensational condition. About 26 inches tall x 24 wide. Gilded frame-liner appears original. He's terrific.

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Carved Folk Art Polychrome Walking Stick

Likely Southern US, ca. late 19th century. Graceful carving. ITS ALL ABOUT THE PAINT. Eye popping and dazzling patterning. Avant-garde for the period in which it was made. Superb condition with scattered wear. About 38 inches long. May rest on a flat surface, or be positioned vertically (comes with a wall mount). Provenance: Southern Collection; David Wheatcroft. By the same hand as a similar cane exhibited at the Brookln Musuem and Los Angeles Museum of Art in 1976, the seminal exhibition of American folk sculpture. Happy to send photos from that exhibition.

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Important William and Mary Lighting Stand in Cherry and Cherry-Burl.....SALE PENDING

Northeast America, likely New England, possibly Connecticut River Valley, ca. 1720-1740. Baluster-turned double candle holder moveable on cherry-wood column supported by a bold exceedingly rare cherry-burl base with ring-turned top and incised lines. The column is surmounted by an acorn finial, a symbol of Huguenot-craftsman and representing many positive attributes, including: life, power, longevity, new growth, good luck, and as a heraldic symbol “independence to its bearer”, and “great oaks from little acorns grow”. Retains period candles. Stands a majestic 29 inches tall. Pictured/described “North American Burl Treen”, Powers, 2005. Provenance: About 1970-2002 Clarke Garrett; then David Good. HAPPY TO EMAIL HIGH RES PHOTOS.

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OUTSTANDING Folk Portrait of a Sidewinder Paddlesteamer Sailing Ship

American, ca. 1840-1860. Oil on canvas. Steam-powered sidewinder sailing ships first came into service about 1840. Initially, these ships were only marginally faster than wind-powered clipper sailing-ships and were prone to mechanical failure and fuel shortage. As such, these early paddlewheeler's were typically fitted with a full complement of masts, rigging, and sails due to the captain's mistrust of the new steam technology......By about 1860, technology improved to the point that they were reliable enough (and now significantly faster than sailing-ships) such that the sailing apparatus, including spare sails, rope, and all things needed to sail were eliminated. A benefit of eliminating sails and support supplies was that there was now more space for passengers and the storage of materials for their comfort and other amenities......This painting is a superb depiction of one of these early hybrid sailing and sidewinder ships. Note the beautiful eagle figurehead (sailors "believed" that the sharp eyes of the eagle would be constantly on the lookout for perilous shoals), and the large anchor attached to the side. A bold American flag alerts of the captain's pride. The ship cuts cleanly through wind-swept seas. The warm tone of the sky is well balanced by the aqua-green of the swirling waters, with dashes of color from flags, figurehead, and anchor......Terrific condition, with very minor in-painting. Chamfered black painted frame appeaers original (with a bit of repair on the lower frame edge). Overall frame size is 35.75 x 25.25 inches. Sight size is 29.25 x 19 inches.....Provenance: Important New England collection, and previously Stephen-Douglas; Robert Thayer.

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SENSATIONAL Theorem Still-Life Painting: Fruit with Melon and Corn and Notable Provenance Including the National Gallery of Art.....SOLD

Probably Connecticut, ca. 1820-1850. Painted on velvet with sliced watermelon centering an abundance of fruit, with an ear of corn in the foreground and two birds perched on leafy vines above. Velvet was the fabric of choice for many early theorems as its napped surface gave an appealing softness to the edges. The floating of strawberries and grapes on the sliced-open facet of the melon, bordering patterned seeds, is rare and likely unique, and is a little gem of a detail that reveals the singular mind of the artist. The bountiful composition of fruits was meant to suggest optimism and plenty. Retains strong colors, with toning and an unobtrusive slit in the upper right. The glass and gilded frame is period and may be original, measuring about 24 ½ inches x 20 ½. Provenance: Sotheby Parke Bernet, Important Frakturs, Embroidered Pictures, Theorem Paintings and Cut work Pictures and other American Folk Art from the collection of Edgar William and Bernice Chrysler Garbisch, 1974, and Washington DC, The NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART, 1953-1974.

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Early Valuables and/or Bible Box in BLUE PAINT with Inner-Till.....SOLD

Northeast America, possibly Mid-Atlantic, ca. 18th century. The blue painted surface early 19th century. Pine, with wooden peg construction, and large corner dovetails. Strap-iron hinges, the upper portions on the inside of the lid, nails “deadened” on the outside, while the lower portion of the strap-hinges are recessed into the backboard and deadened on the inside. Rosehead nails help secure the bottom with wooden pegs. An inner till saw frequent use owing to the patina and burnishing. The lid molding joined by a combination of pegs and nails, and pegged through-tenons. Straight, robust, and true in excellent structural condition with minor damage to one hinge, the paint with expected period wear. Maximum dimensions about 20 inches wide x 12 deep x 8 1/4 tall.

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