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Striking Untouched Portrait of a Boy in Blue.....SOLD

Northeast America, probably New England, ca. 1820. Oil on wooden panel (poplar), very dry having never been over-varnished. The young boy, softly and sensitively portrayed by an unknown artist, is dressed in a blue "skeleton suit" which was fashionable for boys ages 3 to 7 from about 1780 to the 1820's. His jacket is buttoned to high-waisted trousers, appointed with rows of decorative brass buttons that rise over the shoulders, with a broad-collared white blouse. The background is painted sage-gray. The portrait stands out given its simple, uncomplicated aesthetic and blue-dominant presence, the blue standing out even in low light. Old scratches as shown, the poplar panel is bowed about one inch as is often seen on paintings on wood. About 20 inches tall x 16 3/4 wide. Exceptional provenance upon request.

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Shaker Four Finger Box in Rare MEETINGHOUSE BLUE Paint.....SOLD

Maine (Sabbathday Lake or Alfred), ca. 1830. Original authentic and rare Meetinghouse Blue paint, making reference to the original blue paint on the interior woodwork of the Shaker meetinghouse at Sabbathday Lake, as illustrated in Amy Stechler Burns and Ken Burns, The Shakers, Hands to Work, Hearts to God (New York: Aperture Books, 1987), p. 109. Shaker religious laws stipulated that Meetinghouses "should be painted white without, and of a bluish shade within". About 11 3/4 inches long x 8 1/4 deep x 4 3/4 tall. Period wear as shown, including smooth burnishing (from frequent handling) about the edges; structurally excellent with just a minor ancient split underneath. Beautifully carved tapered and chamfered fingers.

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Soulful, Early, Large Colonial American Painted Bowl....SALE PENDING

Northeast, ca. 18th century, original charcoal gray paint (with maybe a hint of blue). Appears to be chestnut or ash. The surface is complex, very dry (never over-varnished) sharing its centuries of history. Vigorous and robust compared to many later examples, with walls exceeding one inch thickness, yet the molded rim with beaded top that extends outward beyond the sidewall, and the decorative incised-turning about three inches below the rim, give the feeling of lightness and sophistication. Expected period wear. Unusually large with diameter about 24 1/2 x 23 inches (a full 1 1/2 inches of shrinkage with desirable "potato chipping") and unusually deep at 8 ΒΌ inches. Weighs over ten pounds. Given its impressive size and surface quality, the presence of this bowl elevates to be a focal point of a room, not just an accessory. Why buy new sculpture when you can acquire one that has witnessed much of our history. Private collection, purchased from noted antique/folk art dealer Marna Anderson. HAPPY TO EMAIL HIGH RES PHOTOS.

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Remarkable, Singular Folk Art Pin Cushion.....SALE PENDING

Northeastern America, likely Pennsylvania, ca 1830. Pasteboard body, weighty and robust in hand, covered with painted cut-paper appliques. The dyed-green fabric domed top covering a padded needle/pin cushion, with intricate woven-looped border. Relating to theorems of the period. The pots with billowing flowers symbolizing optimism and growth. Shows beautifully, even in low light owing to the color-contrast of the appliques against the ground, punctuated by the bittersweet example on the front. About 6 inches wide x 6 1/2 tall x 3 3/4 deep. Terrific condition with minor imperfections. Provenance: 30+ years ago from Ted and Carole Hayward in Maryland (before moving to NH). Shows beautifully!

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Sensational Vibrant Folk Art Portrait of a Child Holding Her Doll

Likely New England, ca. 1830-1840. Unknown artist. Pastel on wove paper. The little girl, her hair in curls, is portrayed against dense foliage with background hill. The artist showed the affection of the little girl towards her doll, as she cradles it in her arms, while her red-purse with bird embroidery hangs from her shoulder. This portrait is about COLOR, with a seldom-found saturated and broad color palette highlighted by the blue dress that stands out from the dark greens and blues of the surround. Exceptional condition. Period gilt frame. Frame size about 18 inches x 15. From a private collection where it has been cherished for years.

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Early Painted Wooden Trammel.....SOLD

New England, ca. late 18th century. Appears to be carved from white oak with original thin red paint. Ratchet mechanism with pivoting handle that locks and releases the extending teeth. Made to hold and to raise/lower lighting devices. Superb woodworking in xxcellent condition. Waxed at some point giving it a soft, mellow surface. About 28 inches closed and can extend to about 4 feet. Provenance: Private CT collection from Lew Scranton.

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Very Rare New England Wallbox and Spoon Rack.....SOLD

Maine, 18th century. An important historical "document" in the form of a wallbox. Original untouched, very dry red, gray, and black paint on pine. A remarkable survivor with a mix of primitive joinery (early nails, including rose heads with simple butted joinery) and more sophisticated carving, the pinwheel decorations showing how important this box was to the original maker and owners. Research also reveals that these pinwheels in early times were sometimes used/known as hexafoils or "witches marks", a pattern with endless lines believed to confuse and entrap malevolent spirits to evoke good luck and to turn away evil. Impressive size at about 25 1/2 inches tall x 14 wide x 6 deep. The modest means of the original owners shown by spaces for only a handful of spoons. The fact that it has survived is sufficient representation of condition to those who understand it, yet losses can be seen particularly in the lower right corner and behind at the shoulders and neck, and at the hanging hole. This is for the passionate collector who seeks special and covets rarity, the visual and emotional character of unaltered history, and surface..

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Rare Survivor. Carved Patriotic Box.....SOLD

Likely Massachusetts, ca. 1830-1860. Transport yourself back into a time in which pride in our new country was so great that the symbol of America was represented everywhere, in this case, on a utilitarian box. Pine top and bottom, ash side-wall, with early, very dry blue paint, yet this box is all about the imagery of a deeply carved, folky representation of the Great Seal of the United States, with patriotic eagle and shield, including a single arrow (representing birth in warfare) and an olive branch (hope for a prosperous, peaceful nation). The box shows significant paint wear, and losses to the upper finger and lid broken out long ago where nails were driven in. About 6 5/8 inches long x 5 wide x 2 1/2 tall. Long time private Massachusetts collection. For reference see: STARS AND STRIPES, Patriotic Motifs in American Folk Art, Harding: and THE AMERICAN EAGLE, Isaacson..

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A LITTLE MASTERWORK(!!!) PORTRAIT OF A BABY BOY WITH RIDING CROP

New England, ca. 1845. One of the finest Prior-school portraits of this type known. Attributed to William Mathew Prior . Oil on board. The inviting warm color palette complemented by the striking, unique, paint decorated frame. The shape of the lips and eyes, and softness of the face are exceptional. The child centering colorful draped swags with rim lighting. Note red corals at each sleeve of the delicate, lace-trimmed dress, the coral typically worn by children as it was believed to ward off evil. He grasps a riding crop, a device sometimes held in portraits as they were a common gift for boys in this period. Even though way too young to ride a living horse or pony, he could saddle-up with his crop on his rocking horse. The paint decorated frame is a treasure on its own, yet combined with the portrait creates a singular presence. Overall frame size about 18 inches x 13 3/4. Exceptional condition. Provenance: Distinguished private collection for decades. A rare opportunity to acquire an iconic folk art image.

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Rare Reeded Queen Anne Painted Sliding Lid Box.....SOLD

Northeast, most likely New Jersey or Pennsylvania, ca. late 18th century. Pine, with dry oxidized paint, which in most lighting is blue dominant; in warm lighting may have a green tone. Nailed joinery. Reeded on all outer-surfaces except the back, the reeding not applied, rather by hand-planing deeply within each board. To accomplish this reeding so precisely required experience and skill. The top of the sliding lid, which dados into the box, has a Queen Anne-shaped profile, and is hollowed on the back as a finger hold. The box was not meant to hang, rather may stand upright on its end, or lie flat. Structural condition is excellent with expected period paint wear. The first-rate painted surface is very dry. Attention getting size of about 15 1/2 inches tall x 6 3/4 wide x 5 1/8 deep. Typically one will see reeding on furniture or boxes as an accent, yet reeding with full coverage like this example is rare. An exceptional period box, likely to store candles.

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