Home  >  Antiques
Antiques
Vibrant True Folk Art Theorem

New England, ca. 1830. Paint on velvet. A "one-in-a-thousand" example with a composition from the mind of the artist retaining remarkably bold, bright, primary colors and accomplished gradation of paint. Set within a simple reductive lemon-yellow basket with green borders. Lights up even a darker space. For the collector seeking the exceptional. Overall frame size about 17 1/2 inches wide x 14 tall. Provenance includes Steward Gregory; Claude and Alvan Bisnoff.

More Information
Fine Early Crisply Made Oval Fingered Box in Deep, Dry Green Paint.....SOLD

New England, ca. early 19th century. Pine top and bottom, and probably ash sidewalled. Made by a skilled craftsman with beautifully carved fingers. Pre-dates Shaker making of similar forms. The oval shape is accentuated. Joinery is by early nails, square in cross section with misshapen heads. The green paint is especially dark and rich, very dry, with a finely crazed surface. Structurally mint. About 6 inches long x 3 3/4 wide x 2 5/8 tall. Private collection for the last 30-40 years, purchased back then from Pam Boynton.

More Information
Exceedingly Rare Carved FREEMASON Watch Hutch.....SOLD

New England, likely Massachusetts or New Hampshire, 18th century. Pine or poplar, with original dry black and salmon paint. Richly carved, including numbers around the dial and five individual carvings of the 'Square and Compass', a symbol of the Freemasons. The compass and square represent the convergence of matter and spirit, i.e., earthly and spiritual responsibilities. One can speculate that this watch hutch was made to display a watch presented for achievement of a Freemason level. About 8 inches tall. Terrific condition with minor hairline. Joinery includes two brass tacks used to hold furniture fabric in that period. Has always hung but could stand as well. Notable Freemans of this period include: George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, John Hancock, John Paul Jones, Samuel Adams, and Paul Revere.

More Information
Vivid Double-Sided Gameboard. Mill Game and Checkers.....SOLD

American, 19th century (1840-1880). Dry bold paint on a single pine board. The front is the Mill Game, featuring rich bittersweet-red paint with yellow, black and a bit of green bordering and corner decorations, similar to one might see on decorated tinware of the period. The back of checkers in the same colors. Excellent period condition with finely crazed paint/overvarnish and strong patina on the edges. About 15 1/2 x 15 3/4 inches x 2 thick (at the moldings).

More Information
Rare Survivor. Antique, Ancient, Colonial Wooden Rooster or Pea Fowl Weathervane.....SOLD

New England. ca. 18th to early 19th century. Pine with remnants of paint, remarkable weathered surface, mounted on the original blacksmith-made wrought strapping and iron rod (with square cross section). The earliest "vanes" were originally called "fanes", which meant pennant or flag. This rooster was one of those early fanes, carved from the imagination of perhaps the farmer who needed an alert to coming changes in weather. The design is beautiful, with grand sweeping tail and full breast. It was made to be seen and to impress. The top of his head retains what appears to its original comb, fashioned from tin, held by early nails. Being outside where it was assailed by wind, rain, snow, sun and buckshot, this vane required much care over the years to keep it together. Repairs include the 19th century addition of thin plates of tinned iron held by cut nails. Separated portions of the tail are held by wire, and the tail is separated from the body, now held by a screw. Terrific scale and presence of about 36 inches from the tip of the tail to the beak, and also about 36 inches from the custom stand to the top of the tail. Provenance: Private collection; Hollis Broderick.

More Information
MINIATURE Cradle Attributed to JONAS WEBER

Leacock Township, Lancaster County, PA, ca. 1840. Pine in original red paint, decorated with polychrome tulips and foliage with very thin crystallized over-varnish. Weber's paint decorated boxes are highly sought by collectors yet are actually more plentiful than his cradles. TINY AT JUST 8 1/2 inches long (MUCH SMALLER than cradles made for dolls). Paint and structurally in superb condition despite an old glued-crack to footboard. Similar examples of Weber toy cradles pictured in "Mennonite Arts" by Clarke Hess, page 66. Provenance: Private Connecticut collection; Sam Herrup, Don Walters, Arthur Liverant.

More Information
A RARE GEM: CHILD'S CHIPPENDALE CHEST.....SALE PENDING

An eye-witness to American Revolution history. In a size AND condition that we will probably not find again! New England, likely Connecticut area, ca. 1780. Cherry primary wood with white pine secondary. Original batwing brasses, and red-pigmented original dry varnish surface. HIGH RES PHOTOS AVAILABLE. Not a miniature, rather made for a child standing about the same height as a candle stand. In period a luxury. Molded top above four thumbnail-molded graduated drawers supported by a notched, square-bracket base. Fully dovetailed case and drawers; deeply chamfered and hand-planed drawer bottoms. Each drawer retains original lock, the presence indicating that the clothing or textiles enclosed within were valuable. Very clean condition inside and out. Back has beautiful dark patina. One very minor repair to one drawer-lip corner. Case width just 24 inches (25 ½ at the base). 27 3/8 inches tall. 11 ½ deep (at the base). Given the small size this chest has the flexibility to be placed almost anywhere, and can function as a lighting stand or side-table. Provenance: Fine private Southern Collection.

More Information
Unique Gameboard from the Early Years of American Baseball

Northeast America, possibly Point Pleasant, New Jersey, circa 1900, perhaps back into the 19th century as there is a cut nail or two visible in the back. Original paint on wooden board. Played with dice, this one of a kind game board was made about the time of Honus Wagner, Rube Waddel, Christy Mathewson, and Cy Young. Clearly played countless times, with much wear that creates a most wonderful historic character, enhanced by a dry, finely-crazed painted surface. The reverse in checkers. Good condition (missing the top segment of molding on the back that does not detract). About 19 inches high x 18 5/8 wide x 1 1/4 thick. What a complement to other baseball memorabila. ASK FOR HIGH RES PHOTOS.

More Information
PILGRIM CENTURY Carved Weaver's Tape Loom

Massachusetts, North Shore Boston, Essex-area, ca. 1680-1710. The rare opportunity to acquire a three-centuries old artifact from early Colonial America made generations prior to the Revolution. WHITE OAK with rich original patina. Carved sunburst crest joined by tiny wooden pegs to the working slats; the base of the slats chip-carved. Pilgrim century furniture and utilitarian objects were typically rectilinear and made of American white oak, emulating the then preferred wood in colonists' English homeland. In the late 17th century, designs began to evolve to more fluid lines while abandoning white oak (which was in great demand for ship building) in favor of walnut, birch, maple, and other local woods that gave a lighter appearance. Tape looms were used by weavers who held the looms between their knees as they worked, producing thin strips of woven fabric called "tapes", plain or patterned, that had a multitude of uses from binding clothing to sacks. Given the time frame and location, this tape loom could have had association with the near at hand Salem Witch Trials in 1692-1693. About 25 inches tall x 11 wide x 1/2 thick. Remarkable original condition with just minor loss on the back. References: Historic New England, The Nina Fletcher Little Collection at Cogswell's Grant, Essex, Mass, accession # 1991.435; The Putnam Family (John Putnam being a witness to the Salem Witch Trials), Northeast Auctions, The Monahan Collection, August 2001 to Bill Samaha; and the Museum of Fine Arts (MFA), Boston, accession # 1977.636.

More Information
Antique Folk Art Parcheesi Gameboard

New England, ca. 1860 to 1875. A colorful country example with a folk-art aesthetic that is more appealing than many of the professionally produced examples. Original dry paint on what appears to be basswood. Folding form with original hinges, with breadboard ends joined by cut nails. Dry, alligatored painted surface. Note how the corner-circles rotate in color position, an unexpected feature that provides movement and energy. About 22 inches x 21.

More Information