Home  >  Antiques
Antiques
Wooden Candle Lantern in Early White Paint......SALE PENDING

Probably New England, ca. 1820 to 1840. Ash or chestnut. Retains what appears to be all original panels glass. First white paint has patinated to a softer "oyster". Joinery of the frame by wooden pegs through extending stiles. Snipe (drawn wire) hinges secure the swinging door (and iron handle), the wire being an early connector when cast iron hinges were expensive or not available. Cut and wrought nails hold the tin dome. The stiles are decorated with carved notches and "lambs tongue", and all edges, inside and out, are molded, not simply squared, an indication of superior craftsmanship and time invested/costliness. Condition: Solid/robust in hand. Lots of patina. Split at the top board. The lower rail on the right side (as one is looking at the door front) is dirtier than others. Tin candle socket is secured by putty, done long ago. Dimensions: 10 7/8 inches tall to the top of the stiles; 11 3/4 to the top of the tin dome; 15 to the top of the bale handle. .

More Information
Most Pleasing Diminutive Hooked Rug.....SOLD

American, most likely Northeastern, dated 1920. Cotton and wool fibers. Composed and made in manner that would seem earlier, this hooked rug has a coveted combination of soft earth tones, "just right" period wear, variegated background, and playful horses. Large petal forms could be interpreted as flowers or possibly snowflakes. Excellent condition with no repairs noted. Museum mounted for easy hanging. About 37 1/2 x 19 1/2 inches. See American Hooked and Sewn Rugs, Folk Art Underfoot, Kopp for reference.

More Information
Puffy Sleeve Artist Silhouette with Brilliant Teal Dress.....SOLD

New England, ca. 1830-1835. Attributed to the celebrated "Puffy Sleeve Artist". Hollow-cut, watercolor on paper over black-fabric backing of an elegant young woman with a room-filling presence that belies its small size. The work is crisply and confidently rendered, and remains in a super state of preservation. The teal dress is likely a unique survival for this artist and elevates the work well above most related examples. Brass frame is of the period and likely original, measuring about 5 1/8 inches tall x 4 3/8 wide. See "A Loving Likeness, American Folk Portraits of the Nineteenth Century", original and supplement, for other examples attributed to the Puffy Sleeve Artist.

More Information
Dated 1838 Landscape "Nature's Outing"

Probably Hudson River School, New York State, signed and dated lower right Maria W Chapin, 1838. Watercolor on paper. Great pride in the compelling natural beauty of the Hudson River drove talented 19th century artists to portray that beauty in landscape paintings, with deep reverance toward the spectacular river and its surrounding mountains. This masterfully executed watercolor is by one of those capable artists who was able to capture that splendor with her brush before the availability of photography. Several vignettes of those enjoying the vista highlight the composition, including a gentleman to the left directing two ladies toward perhaps the sailboats, two fisherman and their companion dog on the near shore, and even the subtle depiction of smoke rising from several distant campfires, suggesting a cold day and maybe more fishermen making a meal of their catches. Very cool to have this "snapshot" of nature and the "outing" clothing of the day over 175 years ago. Well cared for excellent condition. About 26 5/8 inches wide x 18 tall. High res photos easily emailed.

More Information
Outstanding Folk Art Wallpaper Traveling Mirror/Looking Glass

Believed to be from Newburyport, MA, ca. early 19th century. Folding traveling looking glass with the names FAITH HOYT and ABIGAIL ROBERTS. Likely a hand-made gift from one to the other. Folding mirror is encased within embossed hand-blocked wallpaper, with green and blue and bittersweet coloring. Within the case is a folding mirror, with the mirror glass on the right side, and the two girls/women's names on the left. The back is of green wallpaper. Expected wear, yet good condition considering its age and delicacy. Case closed is about 5 inches long x 3 3/4 tall. Opens to about 10 inches. .

More Information
Radiant Folk Art Still Life.....SOLD

Northeast, possibly New York, ca. 3rd quarter, 19th century. From a long time Maine collection. Oil on academy board, the board bearing the label of W. Devoe and Company, New York. Brilliant bright, saturated colors in a most desirable flat (without shadow) folk art rendering. The white reticulated ceramic compote provides an appealing balance to the contrasting colors and random forms of the fruits. The overflowing quantity of fruit symbolizes abundance and optimism. Excellent condition with just a bit of roughness in the lower right. Set within a bold gilded frame that is likely original and beautifully presents the vibrant work. Frame size about 33 1/2 inches wide x 27 1/2 tall; sight size about 23 1/4 x 17 1/2. This painting would brighten and enliven, and is large enough to carry a signficant wall.

More Information
Miniature Turned Bowl Retaining Original Paint History

Probably New England. ca. 1800. Appears to be pine. A miniature example with wonderful shrinkage and retaining early green and black paint over the first red wash or sizing, and remnants of an old oyster white in the interior. Very thinly turned, with chamfered rim and raised foot. Tight shrinkage checks in base. Diameter varies from 5 3/16 inches across the grain; 5 7/16 with the grain (1/4 inch shrinkage). Height varies from 1 5/8 inches to 1 15/16. Miniature turned wooden bowls were seldom made after the early 19th century as they were obsoleted by emerging ceramics and pottery, which were cheaper to make. Large wooden bowls continued to be made for many years as their ceramic equivalents would have been too heavy.

More Information
Sensational Early Tiny Marbled-Paper Box.....SOLD

New York State or New England, ca. 1850 (newsprint dated 1847). Decorated paper on pressed board with newspaper lining inside and underneath. Hand-stitched seam joinery. The beautiful colors and patterns were created using a paper decoration technique called 'marbling', in which dyes are placed on top of a tray of water and a pattern is made using brushes or combs. Paper is then placed on top soaking up the patterned dyes, producing a mirror image. Newspaper content, which includes a hair dye and using Saraparillas as a remedy, has references to Gardiner Flour Mills north of New York City, and Augusta, which may refer to Maine. The condition of this box is near mint. Just 2 5/8 inches diameter x 1 7/8 tall. Has been in a New England collection since 1993.

More Information