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Red Painted Small Document Box in Rarely Found CHERRYWOOD.....SOLD

New England, likely Connecticut area, ca. early 19th century. Entirely in CHERRYWOOD except bottom board which is white pine. Almost always boxes of this form are softwoods pine or basswood. Beautifully DOVETAILED case, the well-developed dovetails "blind" to the front. .....Sturdy, stout, like a little piece of furniture. Retains original hasp, lock, and iron butt hinges. Structurally superb condition, clean and crisp. RICH COLOR, retains very dry, crackly original red paint also in excellent condition save early runs front left. Sleek dimensions of about 14 7/8 inches wide x 5 1/2 tall x 7 1/2 deep. The analogy in a box to high country painted cherrywood Connecticut River Valley furniture, and given the quality of the dovetails, was likely cabinet-maker made. A very desirable box at a favorable price.

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Delightful Folk Art Rendering of a New England Village.....SOLD

New England, ca. mid-19th century. Pastel on paper. Colorful and bright, like a living postcard, this peaceful painting shows a tight protective cluster of large Federal homes, several of the homes with brick fronts and clapboard painted sides, as was a common New England practice. The village has risen alongside a sizable stream-fed pond and waterfall, the waterfall perhaps providing power and terrific fishing location, and with the continous splash of flowing water. As with many folk art townscapes, this idealized rendering shows no clutter or disrepair, rather captures the pride of the owner's in what their village has become. The artist chose black windows, which are particularly effective in providing color-contrast against the soft pastels. The white painted rail-fence on the left, that likely contains livestock and horses, provides a boundary against the dangers of the countryside, while providing a leading line into the village where a white-picket fence implies sophistication and comfort. One can darken the room, light just this painting, and easily travel back into the sights and sounds of a 19th century New England village. Excellent condition with minor restoration. Housed in a custom frame added 25 years ago. Overall frame size about 33 1/2 inches wide x 23 1/2 inches tall. Large enough to carry a significant wall, yet small enough to be versatile.

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Superb Wallpaper Pincushion

Likely Pennsylvania, ca. 1840. Wallpaper on pressed paperboard, embellished with silk ribbon at the corners. 5 3/8 inches long x 4 wide x 2.5 tall (not including the cushion). Colors remain bold and vibrant. Excellent condition.

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Delightful Portrait of a Young Boy with Bird

American, ca. 1840's. Pastel on paper. Unsigned. A most pleasing little boy in a soft, quiet color palette. The boy fashionably attired in what appears to be a long sleeved "skeleton" suit, with three columns of buttons. The quiet of the portrait enhanced by the softness of the bird he holds. Somewhat unusual to find in an early portrait is that the boy wears an earring. The portrait is presented in what is likely its original period mahogany frame. The frame is so well made it is like furniture. Appealing presence with minor spots of loss about the edges and unobtrusive water stains at the bottom. Frame dimensions about 20 1/2 inches x 16 5/8.

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Carved and Painted Sperm Whale by Clark Voorhees

Clark G. Voorhees (1911-1980). Old Lyme, Connecticut or Weston, Vermont. Probably 1950's. Carvings by Voorhees are so highly regarded that even though "vintage" they are often included in fine antiques collections. This carving shows sinuous tool marks following the contours of the whale's body. As with other authentic Voorhees carvings, the carved teeth are set within a carved and applied/pinned lower jaw with the inside of the mouth painted red. The body is painted black, with gray specks representing barnacles. Voorhees' mark and intaglio stamp on back. Excellent condition. About 17 1/2 inches long x 5 3/8 tall x 2 deep. Ask for high resolution photos for detail, including the tiny eye.

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Puffy Sleeve Artist Silhouette with Brilliant Teal Dress

New England, ca. 1830-1835. Attributed to the celebrated "Puffy Sleeve Artist". Hollow-cut, watercolor on paper over black-fabric backing of an elegant young woman with a room-filling presence that belies its small size. The work is crisply and confidently rendered, and remains in a super state of preservation. The teal dress is likely a unique survival for this artist and elevates the work well above most related examples. Brass frame is of the period and likely original, measuring about 5 1/8 inches tall x 4 3/8 wide. See "A Loving Likeness, American Folk Portraits of the Nineteenth Century", original and supplement, for other examples attributed to the Puffy Sleeve Artist.

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Tiny Early "Fragment" Mirror

New England, ca. 1820. Sweet miniature, with original silvered glass, and dry surface on the mitered, molded frame. The glass is no longer reflective due to the elements over time impacting the silvered back, yet the original glass adds much character. Note the tiny dimensions of just 2 3/8 inches long x 1 3/8 wide. 200+ years ago silvered glass was so expensive that even tiny fragments from broken larger panels were made into mirrors. Retains collection number on back of Ted and Carole Hayward.

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Outstanding Folk Art Wallpaper Traveling Mirror/Looking Glass

Believed to be from Newburyport, MA, ca. early 19th century. Folding traveling looking glass with the names FAITH HOYT and ABIGAIL ROBERTS. Likely a hand-made gift from one to the other. Folding mirror is encased within embossed hand-blocked wallpaper, with green and blue and bittersweet coloring. Within the case is a folding mirror, with the mirror glass on the right side, and the two girls/women's names on the left. The back is of green wallpaper. Expected wear, yet good condition considering its age and delicacy. Case closed is about 5 inches long x 3 3/4 tall. Opens to about 10 inches. .

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Outstanding Silhouette by the Puffy Sleeve Artist, Gentleman with Quill Pen.....SOLD

Active 1830-1831, Vermont, Maine, New Hampshire. Confidently attributed to the "Puffy Sleeve Artist" whose works are recognized as a pinnacle of American folk art silhouette making. Hollow-cut watercolor on paper over black-fabric backing of an handsome young man holding a QUILL PEN. The inclusion of the quill pen is a most powerful and fascinating feature, as it represents the gentleman's pride of having writing skill in this period when many had little education, and also symbolizes the pen being mightier than the sword. The work is further distinguished by a brightly colored vest and HEART-SHAPED PIN, and the gray pants are an appealing departure from the typical black. Note the wispy hands, and other fine details including buttons at the cuff. Untouched excellent condition. The brass frame appears original, measuring about 5 1/2 inches tall x 4 3/4 wide. See "A Loving Likeness, American Folk Portraits of the Nineteenth Century", original and supplement, for an excellent resource for other examples by the Puffy Sleeve Artist.

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Early Portrait by JAMES HERRING. Philadelphia

Pennsylvania, ca. 1824. Oil on wooden panel. Wonderful deep, rich, warm colors, executed in a manner similar to ship captain portraits. The sitter is Daniel Yanior, one of the five member "Butcher's Guild of Philadelphia", hence the cattle in the background. The Guild hired Herring in 1824 to paint portraits of each of its members. Confident attribution to James Herring (1794-1867) based on a very similar example, nearly identical for pose and background, signed by Herring and selling at Sotheby's, October 1991, lot 93. Herring is perhaps best known for creating the periodical "The National Portrait Gallery of Distinguished Americans" and "The Apollo Art Gallery". His painting style favored crisp lines and a bold color palette. Paintings by Herring are displayed in a number of museums, including the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Center, NY State Historical Society, National Portrait Gallery, etc. Research on Herring was published in the Magazine Antiques, January, 1978. Condition: A thin restored crack runs vertically from top to bottom of the board; barely discernable. Excellent reproduction frame. Frame size 27 inches wide x 32 3/4 tall; sight size 20 3/8 x 26 1/8..... .

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