Home  >  Antiques
Antiques
Watercolor Portrait Miniature of a Lovely Little Girl with Cat by HENRY WALTON.....SOLD

Probably Ithaca, New York, 1836. Watercolor on paper. Labeled at the bottom on separate paper: "Nancy Ann Halsey Age 1 Yr. 1 Mth. Painted by Henry Walton 1836". Although only 1 year old at the time, Walton rendered Nancy as an older child, an approach often seen by folk artists in this period. Sweet, blue-eyed Nancy stands alongside a painted child's-size Windsor chair and her cat, flanked by a drop-leaf dining table with table rug. The bright orange of her dress and the bold, colorful floor covering give us a look into the design and colors preferred during the American Fancy Period. Note the tiny book held in her left hand, implying the importance placed on reading by her parents. Walton created this lasting image of little Nancy with exceptional skill and sensitivity, prior to the availability of photography. Henry Walton (1820-1873), lithographer and painter. Born in England in 1820. Walton immigrated to Ithaca, NY in 1836 and worked for the lithography firm of Stone and Clark. Although a largely self-taught artist, he is noted for his artistic sophistication in miniatures, landscapes, and portraits. In 1849 he joined the Gold Rush to California. Remains in bright and colorful condition. Faint shadow lines from previous framing on the extreme edges. Presented in a dry, black-painted period frame. Frame size about 8 3/4 inches x 6 1/2. On page 29 of HENRY WALTON, 19th Century American Artist, Ithaca College Museum of Art, there is a similar portrait of Herman Halsey, rendered on the same carpet, probably the brother of Nancy, and also painted in 1836.

More Information
Early Double-Tombstone Wallbox in Original Paint.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca. 1800. Appears to be maple with white pine. Double-tombstone back crest, similar to those seen in chairs of the period over a canted well above a long drawer. The paint is original, a dark oxblood red, with thin, crystalline original over-varnish. The drawer, with thumbnail molding, is dovetailed, the case nailed. The turned pull appears original. Minor imperfections. Very sturdily constructed. May be hung or placed on a horizontal surface. About 13 5/8 inches wide x 16 1/2 tall x 6 1/2 deep. Likely held candles in the well, and tinder material for lighting them in the drawer.

More Information
Oh What a Fragment! Tour de force of Period Carving

Possibly Hudson River Valley or New Jersey, ca. 18th century. Poplar with traces of thin blue paint. Crisply, beautifully, and deeply carved including pinwheels, central fan, and quarter fans. Ends are dovetailed, and back-bottom has a dado-channel, so this fragment appears to have been a drawer front or architectural element. About 35 1/2 inches long x 6 wide x 1 ¼ deep.

More Information
Charming Folk Art Signed Watercolor of Yellow and Blue Birds

New England, ca. 1820. Watercolor and ink on wove paper. Delightfully folky yet sophisticated in its simplicity. Facing yellow birds with blue wings, black eyes, and brown legs are separated by sprigs or green, all on lush green ground. Signed underneath (note the long ‘S’), in what appears to read: “Mifs Francis Hollister”____ “M. A Watson”. Likely a Reward of Merit to Francis from her teacher. Housed in a oyster-white painted ripple frame with gold liner. Frame size about 9 3/8 inches x 7 1/2.

More Information
Folk Art Parcheesi Gameboard

New England, ca. 1850-1880. Pine, with picture-frame molding joined by cut nails. The artist chose a very effective and desirable color combination of strongly contrasting colors of bittersweet and green, with a black ground, lining, and molding, and mustard cross-hatching in the center circle. An earlier game board, not one of the later examples that were more craft than art. Terrific natural patina to the back. Very good condition with expected imperfections from frequent play and a bow to the board within the frame. Applied moldings loose yet intact. Doesn’t appear to have ever been hung, yet easily mounted for hanging. Overall size of about 18 ½ inches square.

More Information
Painted Wooden Bottle BOX.....SALE PENDING

Likely Pennsylvania, 19th century. Original dry red and gold paint on what appears to be popler. Lathe turned. Cleverly separates at a seam about one-third the height. Subtle wavy paint decoration in black. Stamped underneath, in part “DIST PA” (assumning PA is for Pennsylvania). Unknown application, yet unusual form and appealing. Perhaps used for "hiding" valuables "in plain sight" similar to faux-books, yet the stamp underneath may suggest a more specific intent. Superb condition and desirable surface. Solidly made. About 11 1/2 inches tall x 3 3/8 diameter at base. . .

More Information
Petite Barber’s Pole Trade Sign in First Original Paint

American, ca. 19th century. Fully-round lathe turned pine with original first paint in a helix of colors including red, white, blue, gold, and black (non American examples typically just red and white). A very small and appealing size of just 26 inches tall, with legitimate paint-loss from outdoor weathering. Given outdoor use, its unusual to find one with its first paint without later layers of over-paint. Comes with a custom iron wall-mount. Lightweight and easy to hang.

More Information
OUTSTANDING Portrait of a Handsome Teen/Young Man.... Prior

New England, ca. 1835-1845. Oil on pressed board. Attributed to William Mathew Prior (1806-1873). Prior rendered a fun and outgoing likeness of a most confident, pleasant and fashionable sparkly blue-eyed teen/young man with straight hair ending in curls, his black coat and cravat revealing a fine yellow-patterned vest. The painting is bright and clear and appears to be in all original condition retaining its first over-varnish. No appearance of in-painting. Unobtrusive typical minor waviness to the board. Overall frame size about 19 inches tall x 14 1/2 wide; site size about 13 1/2 x 9 1/2. The period frame with cornerblocks is special and presents the painting exceptionally well. The frame bears the label of Montfort Coolidge (1888-1954) of Ogunquit, Maine, a famous artist and antiques dealer. See Artist and Visionary, William Mathew Prior Revealed, Fennimore Art Museum, for reference. A sensational example of Prior's work.

More Information
Folky Young Man Portrait

New England, ca. 1820-1840. Oil on canvas. A most handsome young man (that FACE!) with characteristics that we folk art collectors love. Portraits can be so naive that there is little artistic skill, or so academic that they require an equally academic, formal setting. Yet this portrait falls on the "sweet-spot" of that naive-to-academic continuum. His face is mostly without shadow leading to stylized-combed hair presenting like waves. His black coat and white shirt/collar, and simple background combined with his confident gaze give this painting a clean and uncomplicated aesthetic. It has survived in sensational condition. About 26 inches tall x 24 wide. Gilded frame-liner appears original. He's terrific.

More Information
Historically Important. War of 1812. Folk Art Portrait of Famous American Naval Captain James Lawrence.....SOLD

Northeastern, ca. 1815. Watercolor and ink on wove paper. Painted during a time when American’s were extremely patriotic and proud of their young country, and heroes were often the subject of art. James Lawrence was one of those heroes. His command, the frigate Chesapeake, left Boston on June 1, 1813 and immediately attacked the blockading Royal Navy frigate Shannon. During a fierce battle, the British disabled the Chesapeake. In the less than fifteen minutes of fighting, 228 men were killed or wounded in the bloodiest frigate action of the War of 1812. Captain Lawrence, mortally wounded, ordered repeatedly his famous command, “DON’T GIVE UP THE SHIP. Fight her till she sinks” and “Tell them to fire faster, don’t give up the ship.” Yet the Chesapeake was lost to a British boarding party. Friend and fellow officer Oliver Hazard Perry honored Lawrence with a large battle ensign, stitched with the phrase "DONT GIVE UP THE SHIP". Lawrence was so famous in his day that many streets, counties, cities, and naval ships are named after him. The portrait is an exceptional folk art treasure, retaining rich, saturated colors, and like a window into the feelings of that period. Lawrence is in full-dress uniform with bold gilt mounts and epaulets. He is encircled in a laurel wreath (a mark of honor), his likeness supported by crossed American flags, eagle with shield, a canon, sword, and bayonet. He grasps a highly stylized map, with compass in the upper right, the compass upside down (perhaps symbolizing distress). A water stain on the right does not impact the painted image. Presented in a later gilt-glassed shadowbox which appears to house the original black painted frame. Captioned “Capitaine Larence” and signed lower right “Fredric ___spel pinxt (painted by). Overall frame size about 13 x 11 inches. See http://blog.nyhistory.org/dont-give-up-the-ship/ for a detailed description of the battle. Private Northeast collection. .

More Information