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Hand-Cut Folk Art Love Tokens (Sold separately)

Northeast America, 19th century. The first showing a pair of hands, cut from paper, ornamented with finely crafted rings, cuffs, and emblems in GOLD FOIL. At the top is are beautifully woven conjoined hearts of paper and foil. With blue paper background. Frame size about 10 1/4 inches tall x 8 wide......The second of a paper cutting with four hands, embellished by blue silk and a wreath of plaited hair. Set within a grained painted frame of about 5 1/2 inches tall x 4 1/2 wide.

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Portrait of Daniel Yanior, Member of the Philadelphia Butcher's Guild, by James Herring

Pennsylvania, ca. 1824. Oil on wooden panel. Wonderful deep, rich, warm colors, executed in a manner similar to ship captain portraits. The sitter is Daniel Yanior, one of the five member "Butcher's Guild of Philadelphia", hence the cattle in the background. The Guild hired Herring in 1824 to paint portraits of each of its members. Confident attribution to James Herring (1794-1867) based on a very similar example, nearly identical for pose and background, signed by Herring and selling at Sotheby's, October 1991, lot 93. Herring is perhaps best known for creating the periodical "The National Portrait Gallery of Distinguished Americans" and "The Apollo Art Gallery". His painting style favored crisp lines and a bold color palette. Paintings by Herring are displayed in a number of museums, including the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Center, NY State Historical Society, National Portrait Gallery, etc. Research on Herring was published in the Magazine Antiques, January, 1978. Condition: A thin restored crack runs vertically from top to bottom of the board; barely discernable. The frame is contemporary. Frame size 27 inches wide x 32 3/4 tall; sight size 20 3/8 x 26 1/8..... .

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Very Special Love Token

New England, ca. 1820-1840. Beautifully executed fine cuttings, of paper, of a pair of love birds resting on a heart-in-hand, surrounded by an oval of plaited hair, all set upon a blue-silk backing. Presented in a deeply carved and polychrome frame which is likely the original to the artwork. Frame size of just 4 ¾ inches tall x 3 ½ wide x ¾ thick. Private collection for the last 15-20 years, having come from another private collection before that.

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Watercolor Portrait Miniature of a Lovely Little Girl with Cat by HENRY WALTON.....SOLD

Probably Ithaca, New York, 1836. Watercolor on paper. Labeled at the bottom on separate paper: "Nancy Ann Halsey Age 1 Yr. 1 Mth. Painted by Henry Walton 1836". Although only 1 year old at the time, Walton rendered Nancy as an older child, an approach often seen by folk artists in this period. Sweet, blue-eyed Nancy stands alongside a painted child's-size Windsor chair and her cat, flanked by a drop-leaf dining table with table rug. The bright orange of her dress and the bold, colorful floor covering give us a look into the design and colors preferred during the American Fancy Period. Note the tiny book held in her left hand, implying the importance placed on reading by her parents. Walton created this lasting image of little Nancy with exceptional skill and sensitivity, prior to the availability of photography. Henry Walton (1820-1873), lithographer and painter. Born in England in 1820. Walton immigrated to Ithaca, NY in 1836 and worked for the lithography firm of Stone and Clark. Although a largely self-taught artist, he is noted for his artistic sophistication in miniatures, landscapes, and portraits. In 1849 he joined the Gold Rush to California. Remains in bright and colorful condition. Faint shadow lines from previous framing on the extreme edges. Presented in a dry, black-painted period frame. Frame size about 8 3/4 inches x 6 1/2. On page 29 of HENRY WALTON, 19th Century American Artist, Ithaca College Museum of Art, there is a similar portrait of Herman Halsey, rendered on the same carpet, probably the brother of Nancy, and also painted in 1836.

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Early Double-Tombstone Wallbox in Original Paint.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca. 1800. Appears to be maple with white pine. Double-tombstone back crest, similar to those seen in chairs of the period over a canted well above a long drawer. The paint is original, a dark oxblood red, with thin, crystalline original over-varnish. The drawer, with thumbnail molding, is dovetailed, the case nailed. The turned pull appears original. Minor imperfections. Very sturdily constructed. May be hung or placed on a horizontal surface. About 13 5/8 inches wide x 16 1/2 tall x 6 1/2 deep. Likely held candles in the well, and tinder material for lighting them in the drawer.

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Oh What a Fragment! Tour de force of Period Carving

Possibly Hudson River Valley or New Jersey, ca. 18th century. Poplar with traces of thin blue paint. Crisply, beautifully, and deeply carved including pinwheels, central fan, and quarter fans. Ends are dovetailed, and back-bottom has a dado-channel, so this fragment appears to have been a drawer front or architectural element. About 35 1/2 inches long x 6 wide x 1 ¼ deep.

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Charming Folk Art Signed Watercolor of Yellow and Blue Birds

New England, ca. 1820. Watercolor and ink on wove paper. Delightfully folky yet sophisticated in its simplicity. Facing yellow birds with blue wings, black eyes, and brown legs are separated by sprigs or green, all on lush green ground. Signed underneath (note the long ‘S’), in what appears to read: “Mifs Francis Hollister”____ “M. A Watson”. Likely a Reward of Merit to Francis from her teacher. Housed in a oyster-white painted ripple frame with gold liner. Frame size about 9 3/8 inches x 7 1/2.

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Folk Art Parcheesi Gameboard

New England, ca. 1850-1880. Pine, with picture-frame molding joined by cut nails. The artist chose a very effective and desirable color combination of strongly contrasting colors of bittersweet and green, with a black ground, lining, and molding, and mustard cross-hatching in the center circle. An earlier game board, not one of the later examples that were more craft than art. Terrific natural patina to the back. Very good condition with expected imperfections from frequent play and a bow to the board within the frame. Applied moldings loose yet intact. Doesn’t appear to have ever been hung, yet easily mounted for hanging. Overall size of about 18 ½ inches square.

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Petite Barber’s Pole Trade Sign in First Original Paint.....SOLD

American, ca. 19th century. Fully-round lathe turned pine with original first paint in a helix of colors including red, white, blue, gold, and black (non American examples typically just red and white). A very small and appealing size of just 26 inches tall, with legitimate paint-loss from outdoor weathering. Given outdoor use, its unusual to find one with its first paint without later layers of over-paint. Comes with a custom iron wall-mount. Lightweight and easy to hang.

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Period, Singular, Small-Size George Washington Profile Portrait....Creates an Intriguing Presence from Across a Room

America, ca. 1795-1810. Artist unknown. George Washington (1732-1799) profiled with hair pulled back into a ponytail and tied with ribbon, stylish in the 18th century, similar to depictions in portraits of Washington by Benjamin West, Robert Edge Pine, and James Sharples. This portrait was created in a manner I have not previously seen, and can not find another with research, i.e., reverse painted and parcel-gilt on mercury silvered glass. The glass was likely first silvered, the portrait then fashioned by removing silver to create the negative space of the image, highlighted by parcel-gilt (partial gilding) then backed with pine-pitch or black paint to contrast with the silver. Removal of the backboard reveals that the entire back of the glass is protected with a hardened wood/paper pulp. The attractive frame is original, painted black with gilt trim, and with superb patina…The sawn pine backboard is also original. The glass is exceptionally thin, indicating 18th century making. The frame is joined by un-headed sheared rectangular cut nails, typical of the transition from wrought to cut nails in the late 18th century. Given the period original frame, early and complex imaging process, and extremely thin glass, this portrait was likely created within a few years +/- of Washington’s death on December 14, 1799. The vestiges of time are evident, yet the instantly recognizable and iconic image of Washington is clear. Frame size about 11 ¾ x 9 ¾ inches. From a long time private collection of 17th/18th century Americana.

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