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Scarce Treen Americana-- BURL PLATE (not a bowl)

Northeast America, ca. 18th century. Appears to be ELM burl. No traces of lathe marks, so likely hewn in the form of a turned plate. Perhaps Woodlands-Indian made. Remarkable survivor. Very organic with ancient dry surface, the inside recesses showing traces of white, probably indicating a dairy use. About 9 1/2 x 9 inches diameter x 1 1/2 tall. For the collector who loves early Americana in surface.

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JAMES HERRING: Portrait of Daniel Yanior, Philadelphia

Pennsylvania, ca. 1824. Oil on wooden panel. Wonderful deep, rich, warm colors, compositionally similar to ship captain portraits. The sitter is Daniel Yanior, one of the five member "Butcher's Guild of Philadelphia", hence the cattle in the background. The Guild hired Herring in 1824 to paint portraits of each of its members. Confident attribution to James Herring (1794-1867) based on a very similar example, nearly identical for pose and background, signed by Herring and selling at Sotheby's, October 1991, lot 93. Herring is perhaps best known for creating the periodical "The National Portrait Gallery of Distinguished Americans" and "The Apollo Art Gallery". His painting style favored crisp lines and a bold color palette. Paintings by Herring are displayed in a number of museums, including the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Center, NY State Historical Society, National Portrait Gallery, etc. Research on Herring was published in the Magazine Antiques, January, 1978. Condition: Superb. A thin, barely discernable restored crack runs vertically from top to bottom of the board.. The custom frame is contemporary. Frame size 27 inches wide x 32 3/4 tall; sight size 20 3/8 x 26 1/8..... .

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Miniature Melon Shaped Painted Basket

Northeast America, 19th century. Woodsplint with original white paint. Although having received much use, as evidenced by the worn white paint, the condition is superb. Tightly woven, with beautiful wrapping where the handle is joined to the sides, known as "God's Eyes". Just 5 inches wide at the rim, 6 at the widest of the base, and 5 to the top of the handle. See Schorsch "American Baskets, A Folk Art Tradition", figure 21 for a similar example.

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A RARE GEM: CHILD'S CHIPPENDALE CHEST.....SALE PENDING

An eye-witness to American Revolution history. In a size AND condition that we will probably not find again! New England, likely Connecticut area, ca. 1780. Cherry primary wood with white pine secondary. Original batwing brasses, and red-pigmented original dry varnish surface. HIGH RES PHOTOS AVAILABLE. Not a miniature, rather made for a child standing about the same height as a candle stand. In period a luxury. Molded top above four thumbnail-molded graduated drawers supported by a notched, square-bracket base. Fully dovetailed case and drawers; deeply chamfered and hand-planed drawer bottoms. Each drawer retains original lock, the presence indicating that the clothing or textiles enclosed within were valuable. Very clean condition inside and out. Back has beautiful dark patina. One very minor repair to one drawer-lip corner. Case width just 24 inches (25 ½ at the base). 27 3/8 inches tall. 11 ½ deep (at the base). Given the small size this chest has the flexibility to be placed almost anywhere, and can function as a lighting stand or side-table. Provenance: Fine private Southern Collection.

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Rare Heart and Hand Cookie Cutter

New England, ca. 1840. Tin. The heart and hand was a popular artistic and symbolic feature in the mid-19th century, but usually seen in watercolors. This little cookier cutter is a much-rarer embodiment of that symbolism. About 3 1/2 inches at its widest x 1 1/2 tall including the handle. From a private collection, previously in the collection of Carol Hayward. .

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Small WOOD Jewelers Clock Trade Sign. Rich with Character

America, ca. 3rd quarter, 19th century. An earlier example of the form. Most were made from iron or zinc, the body of this one is carved from one block of wood, with just the hanging ring and ball from iron. Retains remnants of original green paint and gilding about the side edge, traces of white on the dial, while the clock hands and hour markers are black paint. As noted on other early trade signs, the clock numbers and hands stand proud of the surface in part because the black paint protected the wood it covered from weathering away. Note the early form of the terminus of each hand. One side is more worn than the other, owing to one direction receiving more wind and rain. Appealing small size of just 11 inches diameter x 15 tall including the ring; about 4 inches thick. "Figurally-shaped" trade signs like this clock communicated the business well even from a distance in silhouette. Very affordable.

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Early American Lighting----Smoke and Paint Decorated Three-Light Sconce.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca. 1800-1840. Tinned sheet iron (tin) with original dry paint of a buff ground with smoke decoration. Crimped edge, rolled tin (rolling marks clearly seen on photo of the back) as was typical of early tinned sheet-iron manufacturer. Very unusual in that it is fitted with three crimped sconces, each holding a PERIOD hand made candle. Excellent original condition. Measures about 15 1/2 inches long x 10 tall. Given the size and triple lights, perhaps used in a ballroom or meeting house. High res photos easily emailed.

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Singular Folk Art Baby Teether. Period of War of 1812....SOLD

Probably Northeast, ca. 1812. Carved from hardwood with original richly colored surface. Bone handle. Likely a love token (note the heart-shaped "ring") carved by a soldier away from home as a gift for his baby daughter upon return. Engraved JANE CLERE 1812b[orn] on one side of the lamb's tongue tapered stem, the other perhaps of an officer with sword and shako (the shako is a tall, cylindrical military cap). The ring profusely carved in a manner like often seen on busks with stars, hearts, and geometric patterns. The interface between wood and bone has alternating circles with what appears to be worn faces standing proud of the surface. About 6 3/4 inches long.

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Small Stack of Boxes

New England, 1800-1860. STACKED total about 9 inches tall. Individually: BITTERSWEET: Strong color/probably Hingham. The notch in the side is not damage, rather it was cut that way to be used for string (still some string inside)-about 3 1/4 inch diameter x 1 1/2 tall. OXIDIZED GREEN TO BLACK: about 4 inch diameter x 2 tall. early box, very dry surface. TINY GREEN: just 1 3/4 diameter x 1 1/4 tall. LETTER 'L' ON TOP. Very cool box. Hard to find size. Light blue: 4 5/8 x 3/4. Another probably Hingham. Dry surface. UNPAINTED: 3 1/2 x 1 1/2.

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Folk Art Parcheesi Gameboard.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca. 1850-1880. Pine, with picture-frame molding joined by cut nails. The artist chose a very effective and desirable color combination of strongly contrasting colors of bittersweet and green, with a black ground, lining, and molding, and mustard cross-hatching in the center circle. An earlier game board, not one of the later examples that were more craft than art. Terrific natural patina to the back. Very good condition with expected imperfections from frequent play and a bow to the board within the frame. Applied moldings loose yet intact. Doesn’t appear to have ever been hung, yet easily mounted for hanging. Overall size of about 18 ½ inches square.

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