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Vibrant True Folk Art Theorem

New England, ca. 1830. Paint on velvet. A "one-in-a-thousand" example with a composition from the mind of the artist retaining remarkably bold, bright, primary colors and accomplished gradation of paint. Set within a simple reductive lemon-yellow basket with green borders. Lights up even a darker space. For the collector seeking the exceptional. Overall frame size about 17 1/2 inches wide x 14 tall. Provenance includes Steward Gregory; Claude and Alvan Bisnoff. .

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A BEST Labeled Canteen of Considerable Rarity.....SOLD

Northeast America, ca. 18th/early 19th century. Staved construction with beautifully done button-hole hooped joinery. Very dry original soft blue paint oxidized to green with blue highlights. Skillful black-paint labeled: THE 2nd CO. IN THE 16th REGIMENT. Later family label on the back "Canteen carried by Harvey H. Sargent in the Civil War 1861-1865". The form, the paint, and especially the style of the lettering strongly support a 18th to early 19th century making. Consensus is that this canteen was made and labeled in the 18th/early 19th century, then carried in the Civil War by Sargent as a keepsake or good luck piece, perhaps as a gift from an ancestor. Superb solid, uncompromised condition missing only the leather strap. About 6 3/8 inches diameter x 3 3/8 tall. This canteen is one of the finest to be found owing to its great form, condition, blue-green paint, and remarkable lettering.

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Striking Folk Art House Portrait.....SOLD

Found in Maine and very likely painted there, ca. 1840-1860. Oil on canvas board. A most appealing image capturing a pre-Civil War home, with white-walls, brick-red roofing, and bold black window openings and door. The home is framed by a young tree on the left and a pathway smartly angling past the front of the home, intersected by two walkways . The distant hills and valley provide depth and context. The painting would have been commissioned to record the finery of the new home, yet today is a terrific piece of folk art with a composition and colors that speak to a gifted, even if untrained, artist. Fitted to a deeply molded 19th century frame with white-yellow paint that presents the work well. Excellent condition with minor touch-ups; expected craquelure as shown. Substantial scale with overall frame size about 31 inches wide x 25 tall. Eye-catching! HAPPY TO EMAIL HIGH RES PHOTOS.

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The JESTER and the WOODSMAN,Deeply Engraved Early Brass Tobacco Box

Dutch or English, ca. first half, 18th century. Signed and dated in wrigglework under lid “H.G.B 1746”. Deeply engraved brass with unusual subject of a court jester on one side, and a woodsman on the other. Engraved brass tobacco boxes were a means in this early period to demonstrate wealth. Excellent condition. About 4 5/8 inches long x 2 3/4 wide x 1 tall. 30+ years in private collection.

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Proud Folk Art Farmscape.....SOLD

American, late 19th century. Oil on canvas. Folk art townscapes, and house/farm portraits in the 19th century were painted to reflect pride in home, town, and accomplishments. This is a fine example, rendered in a quiet, soft color palette with horse and rider prancing down the path, with their dog in hot pursuit, while in the foreground a mother pig watches as her piglets drink. Several buildings, including a privy set into the trees, surround the elegant, green shuttered white-painted house with picket fence surrounding to keep out farm animals, and scattered flowers. The composition portrays an appealing simpler time. Excellent condition with minor area of toning. Appears to be original, and very pleasing, molded frame with dry, crackled surface. Overall frame size of about 33 inches x 23 inches. A note on the back indicates this painting was found on a long trip years ago.

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“MR BOYD” (Jasper Miles). A Pair of Small Profile Portraits on Wooden Panels of an Attractive Young Couple.....SOLD

Likely Ohio, New York State, or Pennsylvania, ca. 1830-1840. For many years portraits by this artist were attributed to "Mr Boyd". Recent research has now identified “Mr Boyd” as actually Jasper Miles (1782-1849). See Magazine Antiques, July/August 2016 for the research by David Allaway, "Jasper Miles-19th c. Portrait Artist". As is characteristic with other examples by Miles, this pair is oil paint on wooden panels (probably poplar), the panels about nine by seven inches; they have an extraordinary attention to detail in the hair, which is drawn in miniaturist technique with a sharp-pointed brush; and there is a distinctive horn-shaped shading to the inner ear (look closely at the man’s ear). The man has an upright posture, and his far arm is suggested simply by a triangle. As with others of this period, the ovals have rough edges that would be concealed by a cardboard or √©glomis√© mat, and one can see Miles’ color tests and/or brush cleaning outside the image area. Both sitters’ clothing shows subtle, extensive detail, while the lovely young lady’s portrait is enhanced by the splash of color from yellow ribbons in her lace bonnet and her salmon shawl. Note the gentleman’s tie in the form of a bow, his high collar, double-breasted coat, and swept-aside hair part, all high-style for this period. Excellent condition with exceedingly minor retouch to background. Frames are contemporary, made to fit these profiles several decades ago. Overall frame sizes about 11 inches x 9 1/4. Provenance: Long-time Private Collection from Peter Tillou. HAPPY TO EMAIL HIGH RES PHOTOS.

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Moses Ogden Face Sculpture.....SOLD

Angelica, New York, ca. late 19th century. Civil War veteran and sculpture who carved using the “spirit of the trees”. After the Civil War, Ogden lived out his life in the wilds of western New York where he carved whimsical animals and faces from burls, allowing the natural wood growth to dictate the shape and subject of each piece. Postcards show Ogden selling his carvings at a county fair, and photographs show his home as a "Wonderland" filled with sculptures. A mild-mannered furniture and wagon builder by day, but by night he was a warlock. His thing was to go into the woods, find fallen trees that contained monsters, drag them home and set the monsters free. This is a remarkable example of his work of a lady, the contours and figure of the wood clearly employed to communicate facial features and personality.

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A Unique Survivor: Early Carved Peahen Weathervane

Northeast America, ca. late 18th /to early 19th century. Likely Cedar wood, retaining traces of early sage green paint on its beautifully patinated weathered surface. Remarkably, this weathervane is made from a roof-shingle, thicker on the edge of the hen’s head/belly, tapering to very thin at the sawtooth tail. Retains original iron strap onto which the vane was mounted. In addition to weather, this vane survived multiple target shots, with bullet holes shaped in an upward orientation, indicating it was shot while in place at the top of a building or pole. One of these bullets caused a horizontal crack repaired long ago with hide glue. There is also a loss at the top of the middle back, also happened long ago as evidenced by the unchanging dark patina. Feather light and easily wall hung with a custom mount (included). Dimensions about 25 inches from the tip of the beak to the furthest tail point x 9 inches tall. About ½ inch thick at the body, and only 1/8 at the tail end. Provenance: Personal collection of the distinguished dealer Harry Hartman. Pictured in Hartman’s collection, in 1984, in the book “Baskets” by Nancy Schiffer, page 10. HAPPY TO EMAIL HIGH RES PHOTOS.

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Rare Tea Caddy with Hudson-River School Landscape Painted Panels

Northeast America, ca. 1840’s. Featuring six original miniature oil-painted panels, including on the inner-removable vapor lid, decorating a hexagonal, zinc-lined, stop-hinged tea caddy. Inscription under the base (on a label on top of marbleized paper) indicates it was given as a wedding present to Elizabeth Latham (Cole) from her brother Lester Latham in 1848. The panels perhaps are remembrances of places visited or intended. Panel locations include: Front--Desert rock lighthouse (Maine). Back --Near Anthony's Nose (mountain by the Bear Mountain Bridge, it is on the east side with Bear Mountain on the opposite shore). Top---Bridge at Norvine (now a state park in north western New Jersey near Greenwood Lake). Inside lid--the Narrows (entrance to NY harbor). Diminutive size at 5 7/8 inches long x 4 1/2 deep x 3 1/2 tall. Terrific condition with minor expected wear. Interior includes family papers which also prop up the interior lid which is properly shrunk over time. Provenance: long time private New England collection; Israel Sack. Pictured in “Opportunities in American Antiques' Israel Sack Inc, 1997, pg. 51, P-6674.). HAPPY TO SHARE HI RESOLUTION PHOTOS.

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Outstanding CARVED and Painted Early Gameboard .....SOLD

Northeast America, ca. mid-19th century. Pine and original paint. Featuring rarely found relief carved and incised polychrome decoration. Strong patina with rich color and alligatored surface. Corners deeply carved with leaves on branches, sides centered by more leafing. The game bordered by lunettes. Intriguing small carving of a scroll. Yellow squares centered by intaglio-stamped four-leaf clovers, three leaves echoed within each lunette. Applied molded rim attached with square nails. I recall seeing many years ago similar caving on the lid of an early cherrywood wallbox that was sold by Raccoon Creek. About 18 ½ inches x 18.

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