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Outstanding Folk Art Wallpaper Traveling Mirror/Looking Glass

Believed to be from Newburyport, MA, ca. early 19th century. Folding traveling looking glass with the names FAITH HOYT and ABIGAIL ROBERTS. Likely a hand-made gift from one to the other. Folding mirror is encased within embossed hand-blocked wallpaper, with green and blue and bittersweet coloring. Within the case is a folding mirror, with the mirror glass on the right side, and the two girls/women's names on the left. The back is of green wallpaper. Expected wear, yet good condition considering its age and delicacy. Case closed is about 5 inches long x 3 3/4 tall. Opens to about 10 inches. .

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Early Lighting: Carved Painted Trammel and Monumental Fat Lamp.....SOLD

Probably New England, ca. 1800. The trammel carved from pine retaining early black paint and scroll-shaped mounts. The fat lamp is exceptionally large, has chased decoration about the name plate which is pierced with the initials CG, and surmounted by a heart-pierced finial. Likely gifted on an anniversary, wedding, or birthday as a love token. The trammel, when closed, is about 37 inches tall; the fat lamp stands about 10 inches tall with an enormous 5 1/2 inch diameter bowl, several times larger than typically seen. The combination of personalization, pierced heart, early paint, and exceptional size (lamp) make this early lighting fixture scarce and most desirable.

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Miniature Turned Bowl Retaining Original Paint History

Probably New England. ca. 1800. Appears to be pine. A miniature example with wonderful shrinkage and retaining early green and black paint over the first red wash or sizing, and remnants of an old oyster white in the interior. Very thinly turned, with chamfered rim and raised foot. Tight shrinkage checks in base. Diameter varies from 5 3/16 inches across the grain; 5 7/16 with the grain (1/4 inch shrinkage). Height varies from 1 5/8 inches to 1 15/16. Miniature turned wooden bowls were seldom made after the early 19th century as they were obsoleted by emerging ceramics and pottery, which were cheaper to make. Large wooden bowls continued to be made for many years as their ceramic equivalents would have been too heavy.

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Fabulous Ship Portrait of the "John Spear", Built in Thomaston, Maine, Entering the Port of Naples, 1861.....SOLD

Gouache on paper, ca. 1860s. Attributed to port painter Luigi P. Renault of Leghorn (b. 1845). The JOHN SPEAR was built in Thomaston, Maine in 1849, sailed out of Rockland, Maine in the 1850's, and was home-ported out of New Orleans in 1861 when it sailed to Italy as the subject of this painting. Caption reads, in script: Ship "John Spear" from New Orleans, entering the port of Naples, March 9th 1861, J.S. Ingraham, Commander..... Bold and colorful and striking, this painting reflects the pride of American maritime commerce in the 19th century. The American flag, and the ship banner, stand out beautifully. Notable on the right is a ship bearing a mix of paddle/sail propulsion, as the transition occurred from wind to steam in the mid-19th century. Also note the crew members and passengers on the deck. Provenance: Sold in 1972 by Samuel L. Lowe, Jr, Boston, MA. This painting has been in a Rochester, NY collection since then. Pictured in the Magazine Antiques, page 339, February, 1972. Accompanied by a portfolio of background papers, and the Magazine Antiques from which it was originally pictured. Frame size about 36 inches x 28 inches. This painting has a stunning decorative and historical presence. Ask for high res photos to appreciate it.

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Fanciful Folk Art Paint Decorated Dome-Top Box or Dower Chest

From the Lewiston, ME area. Circa 1830. Basswood. Dovetailed case. Delightful palette and color contrast with wisps of black paint and yellow and black dots against a rich 'old brick red' colored ground. The pattern formed has some order, as if the dots were being carried horizontally in the black wind around the central initials M.A.P., yet follows no predetermined pattern and is without aid of comb or other limiting device. This wonderful palette and original, whimsical, free-form decoration in dramatic colors elevate this box above most of its contemporaries. Excellent condition retaining original hinges and hasp and side handles (missing just one bale). Paint has expected minor scuffs and wear. Ample size at about 30 inches wide, which, combined with the lock set, indicates that in-period this box likely held expensive textiles or clothing, which were of sufficient value to merit lock and key, or served to secure a young lady's valuables, i.e., a dower chest. M.A.P. was likely the initials for whom the box was made. Feel free to ask for high res images, as the impressive nature of this box is more readily seen in larger size.

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Outstanding Theorem with Bold Colors and Impressive Scale.....SOLD

New England, ca. 1830. Watercolor on velvet, with saturated colors on bountiful fruits, including a two-tone blue watermelon, set upon a handled "Leeds" platter, . A nearly identical example, complete with a watermelon on a platter, is illustrated in Jean Lippman's American Primitive Painting from the Holger Cahill Collection. Superb condition. Set in a terrific period molded gilt frame. Overall frame size of 27 1/4 x 24 1/4 .

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Bright, Beautiful Theorem

Likely New England, ca. 1830-1840. Paint on velvet. Exceptional visual appeal, retaining bright colors and crisp, clean composition, the flowers bursting from the bulging, stylized basket with delightfully exaggerated in-curved sides, the basket resting on graduated steps. Fancy theorems were painted in this period as gifts for friends or to brighten one's home, the still life often chosen as the subject as a symbol of abundance, and velvet for its soft appearance. These theorem paintings were as painstakingly rendered as fine needlework samplers. The artist, typically a lady, often ground and mixed her own paints, designed and carefully cut her own stencils, and employed practice sheets, study notes, and color samples. Some young women of well to do families attended seminaries where they could learn drawing and painting. This exceptional example has frame dimensions of about 22 3/4 inches wide x 21 tall. Outstanding condition with light toning.

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Sensational Early Staved Bucket in Original SAGE Paint.....SOLD

New England, ca. early 19th century. Appears to be pine, and likely ash handle. I have had very small examples of this exceptional sculptural form, but not this large. Made by a cooper with a keen eye for design, the shaped swing handle is joined to elongated side-stiles with large wooden pegs that are pinned on the interior. Bands to secure the staves are joined with cut (square) and wrought nails. Smooth burnishing is evident on the under-edge of the base, tops of the tall staves, and edges of the handle. Paint is early and original, and oscillates between sage green and a bit gray depending upon lighting. Condition is terrific, with only a minor split that doesn't go through on the handle. About 9 1/2 inches tall to the top of the side staves; 15 3/4 when the handle is fully verticle. A superlative of the intersection of early and color; and exceptional design and craftsmanship.

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