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Bright and Beautiful Antique Game Board with Brilliant Composition

For the historic or modern home. Chess/checkers. Rich color-contrasts that are vigorous even across a room. Each square divided into halves with similar hues yet at different intensities, creating a dance that feels three-dimensional. The artist enclosed the board within a black border and frame, "the blackness" influencing the mind to interpret the enclosed colors with more saturation, while enlivening the border with gilt pin-striping and tiny bursts. American, ca. 1870. Cut-nail applied picture-frame molding to the single board. Excellent condition with a couple of minor fills. Superb finely crazed surface. About 15 1/2 inches square x 1 inch thick. ASK FOR HIGH RES PHOTOS TO APPRECIATE THIS WORK OF ART

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Rare Homespun Barn Owl "Scarecrow".....SALE PENDING

American, 19th century. An amazing sculptural barn owl made of homespun, straw, wood, and paint. Cleverly fashioned from available material to provide a means to frighten off rodents and birds within the barn. Bulbous body filled with straw, mounted on its original, highly patinated pine wood post (with attached bracket for mounting), facial features hand-painted, with a carved pine beak. Likely had several bird feathers originally which would catch the draft and give movement. How did it survive?! Stands about 24 inches tall. Folk art now that began life with a utilitarian purpose. Some years ago from an important NJ collection, most recently in a private West Coast collection.

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Historic Art and Design. Antique Two-Sided Gameboard with Remarkable Color, Craftsmanship, and Condition.

A historic and beautiful game board that would impress within a period or modern home. Checkers/Chess/Backgammon. The red and black playing squares with clever gilt border which gives the illusion of a "raised" playing field, the field enclosed within another green border decorated by pin striping and corner cartouches. All within another gilt border and cut-nail applied picture frame molding. The reverse backgammon personalized with the initials FML within a central medallion centering precisely rendered geometrics. Incredible detail. Sensational finely crazed surface. About 16 inches square by 1 inch thick. American, ca. 1870. ASK FOR HIGH RES PHOTOS TO APPRECIATE THIS WORK OF ART

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Extremely Rare PAINT DECORATED Federal CHILD'S Chest.....SOLD

An exquisitely PAINTED (not veneered) country piece emulating a fine city example. Make a statement in your home today as this little chest did some 200 years ago. Distinctive and authentic with a proud elegance owing to the sophisticated form and remarkable PAINT DECORATION created by a skilled designer, cabinet-maker, and artist. Just look at how beautifully the paint-decoration is rendered. New England, probably Southern Maine to Portsmouth NH to Salem, MA, ca. 1810-1820. Maple, basswood, and pine. Untouched including the original paint and surface, and undisturbed brass pulls. All four corners having crisply turned columns and legs with cookie-corner tops. The apron drop even retains its flaring spurs. So well cared for...in sensational condition with just minor blemishes. Proportionally perfect at about 22 inches wide x 22 tall x 11 deep.

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Carved Fylfot Butter Print.....SALE PENDING

Northeastern, ca. early 19th century. Appears to be maple with rich undisturbed patina. Lathe-turned bold large ball handle with a deep hand-carved fylfot, the tool marks still readily apparent. Although we don't know exactly what the fylfot symbolized, we know that it was important, beyond just decorative, and has been seen in both secular and sacred contexts. Research suggests it may represent the sun, energy, rebirth, and/or renewal. The fylfot is often seen on early New England and Pennsylvania decorative arts, and is frequently found on the relief-carved rosettes terminating the split-pediments of 18th century Connecticut furniture. About 5 ½ inches tall x 3 3/8 diameter. A fine example of American carved treen.

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SISTER'S BOND. Antique Life-Size Double Portrait by Joseph Goodhue Chandler. 1848

Inscribed on the back: "Painted for Victoria A. and Virginia R. Wilder aged 6 years/by J.G. Chandler February 1848"..... Oil on canvas. The sisters portrayed wearing russet dresses and white pantaloons. Likely in the area of Hubbardston, Massachusetts. This portrait delightfully conveys the bond between the two sisters, embodied by their joined hands and shoulders forming a symbolic heart, in a manner that would be difficult to show as effectively even with the realism afforded by the then emerging availability of photography. And the color certainly could not have been matched by the monochromatic photographic images of the day. Note the sizeable house on the hill behind the girls, (likely their family home), the fishermen on the nearby pond, and the foreground flowers. Impactful scale! Sight size about 56 x 28 inches. Frame size about 66 tall x 39 wide. Paintings by Chandler are in many important antique and folk art collections, both private and institutional, the latter including the Shelburne Museum, the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Center, the New York State Historical Museum at Cooperstown, and the National Gallery of Art...... Provenance includes: Hirschl & Adler; Leigh Keno; pictured and discussed in the Highly Important Americana from the Stanley Paul Sax Collection, Sotheby's, January, 1998; prominent Midwest Collection.

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Portrait Miniature Attributed to Clarissa Peters Russell (Mrs. Moses B. Russell).....SALE PENDING

Boston, ca. 1840's. A handsome little blue-eyed baby boy, in blue dress, grasping foliage, in a gold locket that may have been worn about the neck. Later it was housed in a period frame, with glass front, acting like a shadow box. The condition of the watercolor is superb. Tiny specks under his chin are on the inside of the shadow-box glass, not on the locket or painting itself. The portrait is about 2 inches tall, the locket ads another half inch. The outer framed shadowbox is 6 x 4 3/4. Clarissa Peters Russell was a miniaturist well known for her delicate depictions of children. Unlike the other miniature painters working in Boston, Mrs. Russell continued to work prolifically despite the rising popularity of the daguerreotype. When Clarissa Russell died in 1854, the story was front page news in Boston. See for reference: American Portrait Miniatures, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Abrams. Provenance: Washington DC area private collection..

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James and Lydia Russell HANNAFORD Marriage and Family Record

New England, ca November 18, 1793. Watercolor and ink on wove paper. Signed "Caroline Hill", likely the artist. The Hannaford name is well known in the northeast for a chain of grocery stores. This family record is believed to represent that family. Hope (the lady with anchor) is pictured at the right, with "mother and child" at the left, flanking a pillared arch with ornamental scrolls, eagles, and red curtains with blue tassels. James and Lydia, both born in 1773, are listed above their 13 children, born between 1794 and 1817. Fine condition retaining strong colors and expected toning. Early frame of about 16 1/3 x 13 1/2 inches. .

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Authentic Shaker Beans Pail.....SOLD

Most likely Canterbury, NH, ca. mid 19th century. These are RARE. Just a few sets of Beans, Rice, and Oatmeal are known. Each in dark mustard-yellow paint with freehand black-paint lettering, the lettering with a delightful reverse slant. As with other authentic examples, this Beans bucket is made by the Shaker cooper with interlocking V-shaped tongue and groove joinery to the pine staves. The concave birch handle has a central scribe line, and another 1/8 inch from each end. The bail plate is an inverted tear drop. Condition is solid with honest wear as it was really used. About 9 inches tall not including handle; 12 1/2 diameter at the top. See the Shaker Museum, Mt. Lebanon, for a group of one Beans, Rice, and Oatmeal. Also see Shaker Woodenware, Sprigg and Johnson, Volume I, for an Oatmeal example. .

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Exceptional Polychrome Hollowcut Silhouette Pair with Stylized Bust-Lines

Probably New York State or New Hampshire, ca. 1830-1835. PRE-PHOTOGRAPHY MEMORIES. Watercolor, graphite, and ink on wove paper. Based on the distinctive bust-lines, the artist is attributed to the deaf-mute artist JAMES HOSLEY WHITCOMB, based on research published in the New Hampshire Historical Society magazine (1977) by Donna-Belle Gavin. James Holsey Whitcomb (1806-1849) born in Hancock, New Hampshire. This pair of silhouettes has it all! Note they are each "twice" hollow-cut, with the heads and bust-line areas cut and backed with black-silk, while the clothing is watercolor painted on the wove paper. The gentleman, identified as CHARLES BUROUGHS, is particularly beautifully decorated with a blue-gray coat (with buttons that stand proud), yellow vest, and blue-patterned cravat, with high white collar. The lady, LUCINDA BURROUGHS, also shows blue-gray with a splash of yellow. Based on a granny-note accompanying the piece, Charles was born in New York State in 1790, and Lucinda also in New York (Hoosick) in 1796. They were married and had 11 children. Subtle graphite embellishments are seen about their heads. Presented in a beautiful one-piece period frame, that may be original, with molded edges and central divider. Fine condition with minor toning. Frame size about 10 1/4 inches wide x 6 1/2 tall x 5/8 thick. See Skinner, the Lewis Scranton collection, 2016, for another pair by Whitcomb. Also see Silhouettes in America, 1790-1840, Blume Rifken, pp. 74-75. From a private Pennsylvania collection.

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