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Neat Little Child's Bootjack in Original Red.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca early 19th century. Orignal paint on pine. Scarce in a size for a child, this sweet little bootjack suggests an anthropomorphic design in a rich dry red paint with complex surface. The clever design enhanced by the back rail that is attached to the body via sliding dovetail. Just 11 1/2 inches tall x 5 wide. Although utilitarian in use, a delightful sculptural form.

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Flamestitch Pocketbook in Remarkably Bold Colors. 18th Century!

Probably Northeast or Mid-Atlantic, ca. 1750-1790. As it brightened lives post-Revolution, this embroidery will brighten your life post-COVID. Crewelwork (embroidery done with wool yarns) with silk lining. Not only boldly colored, yet in such a remarkable condition that the colors remain vigorous and saturated to this day. Twill-wool tape bindings (made on a tape loom), and the seldom found retention of much of the twill-tape for enclosure. Likely made as a special gift ((or for herself) by a young woman who learned the art in an 18th century needlework school. Imagine the effort to color the wools (dyed-in-the-wool) in that period. Difficult to determine if made for a man or woman, yet it would have carried small valuables, the man more likely money and important papers, the lady jewelry. The front flap folds over to a double-pocketed interior, lined in green silk, the silk also in superb condition. Colors include bittersweet, yellow, mauve, pink, light gray, light blue, sage green, and a dark green. About 8 1/2 inches long. Reference: "Worldly Goods", Philadelphia Museum of Art: "What Clothes Reveal", Baumgarten, Colonial Williamsburg; and "Little by Little", Nina Fletcher Little. Clearly this pocketbook was stored away for much of its two and one-half century history. Now it can help help brighten your home.

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Precisely Woven Basket in Oyster White Paint.....SALE PENDING

Probably New England, ca 19th century, around 1880. Possibly Shaker made. Original white paint on the visible surfaces (the bottom unpainted) on a very carefully crafted, delicate, hex-shaped body with round wrapped rim. This form with open-weave often intended for cheese drying, yet this basket appears to have had little use. Despite its feather-light delicate feel, it has survived in terrific condition with just minor loss. About 11 1/2 inches diameter x 3 tall. Provenance: Private Northeast collection for twenty years.

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A Special Group of Painted Woodsplint Baskets.....ALL SALE PENDING

Northeast America, all mid to second-half 19th century. For those unfamiliar with early baskets, forget about what you might see today in a store, they have no relation to these. These baskets were all made with experience and skill with an eye to form and design, to last for generations, which these all obviously have. Their condition is exemplary, and their painted surfaces are all dry and with enormous character. All from the same New England collection. See David Schorsch's book on American Baskets, A Folk Art Tradition, to get an appreciation of these useful works of art. They would make a statement in your home. DESCRIBED SEPARATELY IN INDIVIDUAL POSTINGS!

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Bold Woodsplint Basket in Rich Chocolate Brown Paint.....SALE PENDING

Northeast America, ca. 1850 . Robustly made, heavy in hand. Oblong rim wrapped opening over bulbous-squared body. Stout rails underneath protected the splints. Half-round carved fixed handle. About 10 inches tall to the top of the rim, about 14 inches to the top of the handle, rim about 14 1/2 x 13 1/2. Super patina. Exemplary presence and feel.

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SIGNED Woodsplint Basket in BLUE Paint.....SOLD

Northeast America (could also be southern) ca. 1850 . Distinguished by scarce, very dry blue paint and signed on the handle, presumably the maker, JS SPENCER, deeply impressed. Round wrapped rim, opening over swelled-squared body. Rails underneath protecting the splints. About 8 1/2 inches tall to the top of the rim, about 15 inches to the top of the handle, rim also about 15 inches diameter. Signed and in blue-find another!.

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Outstanding Woodsplint Basket in Sage Green Paint.....SALE PENDING

Northeast America, ca. 1850 . Elegant form! Lovely sage-green paint. The wrapped round rim over swelled-round body, with high-kick in the base. Sits as perfectly as the day it was made. A sculpture. Perfect form. Half-round carved handle. About 9 3/4 inches to the top of the rim, 16 to the top of the handle, diameter at rim 15 3/4. A sophisticated and especially beautiful example.

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SISTER'S BOND. Antique Life-Size Double Portrait by Joseph Goodhue Chandler. 1848

Inscribed on the back: "Painted for Victoria A. and Virginia R. Wilder aged 6 years/by J.G. Chandler February 1848"..... Oil on canvas. The sisters portrayed wearing russet dresses and white pantaloons. Likely in the area of Hubbardston, Massachusetts. This portrait delightfully conveys the bond between the two sisters, embodied by their joined hands and shoulders forming a symbolic heart, in a manner that would be difficult to show as effectively even with the realism afforded by the then emerging availability of photography. And the color certainly could not have been matched by the monochromatic photographic images of the day. Note the sizeable house on the hill behind the girls, (likely their family home), the fishermen on the nearby pond, and the foreground flowers. Impactful scale! Sight size about 56 x 28 inches. Frame size about 66 tall x 39 wide. Paintings by Chandler are in many important antique and folk art collections, both private and institutional, the latter including the Shelburne Museum, the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Center, the New York State Historical Museum at Cooperstown, and the National Gallery of Art...... Provenance includes: Hirschl & Adler; Leigh Keno; pictured and discussed in the Highly Important Americana from the Stanley Paul Sax Collection, Sotheby's, January, 1998; prominent Midwest Collection.

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Profusely Carved and Chip-Decorated Small Sliding Lid Box

Probably New England or Pennsylvania, ca. 1780-1820. Prominently features the FYLFOT as one of the carved pictorial elements. Although we don't know exactly what the fylfot symbolized, we know that it was important, beyond just decorative, and has been seen in both secular and sacred contexts. Research suggests it may represent the sun, energy, rebirth, and/or renewal. The fylfot is often seen on early New England and Pennsylvania decorative arts, and is frequently found on the relief-carved rosettes terminating the split-pediments of 18th century Connecticut furniture. The box also features stylized conjoined hearts, implying being made for a special occasion such as a wedding or anniversary. Carved from a single block (not joined) of dense hardwood. Surprisingly heavy in hand. Retains original thin black paint, with traces of crackled over-varnish within some of the pictorial elements, perhaps used to highlight them. Indistinctly inscribed underneath the lid "This belonged to...given...." The time and effort and precision shown in the carving suggests the box having been important to the maker. Just 9 inches long including the over-extending thumb piece x 3 wide x 2 3/4 tall. Exceptional condition and may be laid flat or stand on end. Favorable price, email me.

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James and Lydia Russell HANNAFORD Marriage and Family Record

New England, ca November 18, 1793. Watercolor and ink on wove paper. Signed "Caroline Hill", likely the artist. The Hannaford name is well known in the northeast for a chain of grocery stores. This family record is believed to represent that family. Hope (the lady with anchor) is pictured at the right, with "mother and child" at the left, flanking a pillared arch with ornamental scrolls, eagles, and red curtains with blue tassels. James and Lydia, both born in 1773, are listed above their 13 children, born between 1794 and 1817. Fine condition retaining strong colors and expected toning. Early frame of about 16 1/3 x 13 1/2 inches. .

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