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A Rare Early Busk with Notable Provenance.....SOLD

Carved at Grand Bank, Nova Scotia, ca. 1764. Birchwood with naturally oxidized patina. A SENSATIONAL VIEW INTO PERIOD LETTERING, as it is inscribed on the reverse: "July Ye 17, 1764, A Busk, Made At Ye Grand Bank". Note the use of the early 24-letter alphabet that uses I for J, and V for U. The front skillfully carved including a stylized heart. Likely sailor-made as a gift to a back-home sweetheart as only a handful of residents made Grand Bank their home in 1764 (famous explorer Captain James Cook mapped the area in 1765). And given the proximity to New England, very likely that sailor was from a colonial American port. Superb condition. About 13 inches long x 3 wide....................Provenance: NINA FLETCHER LITTLE collection, sold at the Little auction January 29, 1994, lot 151, and in a private collection until recently. Published/PICTURED in Nina Fletcher Little, "Country Arts in Early American Homes," p. 56, fig. 53.

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Early Valuables and/or Bible Box in BLUE PAINT with Inner-Till.....SOLD

Northeast America, possibly Mid-Atlantic, ca. 18th century. The blue painted surface early 19th century. Pine, with wooden peg construction, and large corner dovetails. Strap-iron hinges, the upper portions on the inside of the lid, nails “deadened” on the outside, while the lower portion of the strap-hinges are recessed into the backboard and deadened on the inside. Rosehead nails help secure the bottom with wooden pegs. An inner till saw frequent use owing to the patina and burnishing. The lid molding joined by a combination of pegs and nails, and pegged through-tenons. Straight, robust, and true in excellent structural condition with minor damage to one hinge, the paint with expected period wear. Maximum dimensions about 20 inches wide x 12 deep x 8 1/4 tall.

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Opposing Finger Box Initialed PC.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca. 1840. Pine top and bottom with what appears to be ash sidewall. Joinery by iron tacks. Labeled in bittersweet with the initials P.C. over mustard. Retains thin over varnish. Excellent condition missing just one peg in the base. About 5 5/8 inches long x 3 7/8 wide x 1 15/16 tall.

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A BEST Labeled Canteen of Considerable Rarity.....SALE PENDING

Northeast America, ca. 18th/early 19th century. Staved construction with beautifully done button-hole hooped joinery. Very dry original soft blue paint oxidized to green with blue highlights. Skillful black-paint labeled: THE 2nd CO. IN THE 16th REGIMENT. Later family label on the back "Canteen carried by Harvey H. Sargent in the Civil War 1861-1865". The form, the paint, and especially the style of the lettering strongly support a 18th to early 19th century making. Consensus is that this canteen was made and labeled in the 18th/early 19th century, then carried in the Civil War by Sargent as a keepsake or good luck piece, perhaps as a gift from an ancestor. Superb solid, uncompromised condition missing only the leather strap. About 6 3/8 inches diameter x 3 3/8 tall. This canteen is one of the finest to be found owing to its great form, condition, blue-green paint, and remarkable lettering.

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Diminutive Paint Decorated Lidded Box.....SOLD

Northeast America, ca. 1820-1840. Original ochre paint over mustard ground, with the ochre moved into attractive patterns while still wet by a rag or other device. Taller–than-wide slightly bulbous body with turned lid, surmounted by an integral turned finial. Minor paint losses and unobtrusive minor stain (shown). Structurally excellent with no cracks. Pleasing size of about 4 1/4 inches to the top of the finial x 3 3/8 diameter. Likely to hold spices or sugar. Nice.

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The JESTER and the WOODSMAN,Deeply Engraved Early Brass Tobacco Box

Dutch or English, ca. first half, 18th century. Signed and dated in wrigglework under lid “H.G.B 1746”. Deeply engraved brass with unusual subject of a court jester on one side, and a woodsman on the other. Engraved brass tobacco boxes were a means in this early period to demonstrate wealth. Excellent condition. About 4 5/8 inches long x 2 3/4 wide x 1 tall. 30+ years in private collection.

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Proud Folk Art Farmscape

American, late 19th century. Oil on canvas. Folk art townscapes, and house/farm portraits in the 19th century were painted to reflect pride in home, town, and accomplishments. This is a fine example, rendered in a quiet, soft color palette with horse and rider prancing down the path, with their dog in hot pursuit, while in the foreground a mother pig watches as her piglets drink. Several buildings, including a privy set into the trees, surround the elegant, green shuttered white-painted house with picket fence surrounding to keep out farm animals, and scattered flowers. The composition portrays an appealing simpler time. Excellent condition with minor area of toning. Appears to be original, and very pleasing, molded frame with dry, crackled surface. Overall frame size of about 33 inches x 23 inches. A note on the back indicates this painting was found on a long trip years ago.

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Oval Opposing Finger Box with Scarce Decoration.....SOLD

New England, ca. 1820-1840. Original paint; pine or basswood top and bottom; maple side band. Most boxes of this form are found unpainted or with a single solid color. This scarce paint decoration successfully pairs whimsical free-hand black "tears" and wisps with stenciled overlapping leaves (the stencils likely hand-cut) on a brilliant yellow foundation. Paint is dry yet appears to have been protected by a very thin over-varnish. Paint is in excellent condition, with minor wear. Box is structurally excellent with no cracks. Dimensions are about 5 inches long x 3 3/4 wide x 1 5/8 tall. See American Fancy, Exuberance in the Arts, 1790-1840 for reference. I've had less than a handful of paint-decorated opposing finger boxes ever.

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Rare Colonial Wall Box with Twin-Lollipop Hangers.....SOLD

New Hampshire, ca. 1750-1765. Pine, with very dry original oxblood red paint. Descended in the "French" family of Portsmouth, NH. Oral family history has this box making the move to Portsmouth from what was then Rumford, NH (renamed Concord in 1765). The double-lollipop hangers, unique in my experience, are tall and stately, with notched necks flowing into incurved shoulders. Lollipops are carved, not sawn. Scholarship suggests the double-lollipops symbolize man and woman or husband and wife, yet perhaps they simply function to prevent the box from swinging. The box saw frequent use as evidenced by patterns of wear to paint and inner box. It survives as a stately, important view into pre-revolution rural colonial America. Joinery of the thick walls by rosehead nails with several nails having lost their heads or replaced by somewhat later nails. Condition is very good with expected irregularities at the locations of the nails. May hang or rest on a flat surface. About 14 1/4 inches tall x 12 wide x 6 deep.

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Large Bowl in Yellow Paint.....SALE PENDING

Northeast America, ca. 1820-1850. Appears to be poplar. Slow-lathe turned and footed. Period 19th century very dry, soft mustard/yellow paint over what may be an earlier thin paint or primer. Inside does not have knife marks and is light in color, indicating that this bowl was likely used for dough or dairy, not for chopping or other food preparation. Large size at about 20 5/8 inches diameter with 5/8 inches of shrinkage across the grain. Quite deep at 6 11/2 inches. Excellent condition with no cracks. Outdoor photos shot in 6 degree windchill! (I wanted to show yellow in natural light).

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