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Dated HANNAH BROWN Needlework Pocket, American Revolution Period

HANNAH BROWN. Dated 1780. Primarily wool and silk. Of a small, delicate size for a pocket, this exceptional embroidered flame-stitch-variant pocket is rarer than similarly crafted pocketbooks. Representative of the best American needlework. Beautiful, labor-intensive textiles for personal adornment were amongst the most valuable possessions in the 18th century and a symbol of status. Probably made by Hannah for her own use, imagine her wearing this pocket at the finest gatherings. And like samplers, needlework accomplishments were often part of a young woman's dowry. Handsomely mounted for presentation yet also easily removed from the mount if desired. The pocket is about 7 inches wide x 10 1/4 to the top of the silk hanger. Mounting is about 12 3/4 inches x 9 3/4. Excellent condition with minor losses. Reference: "Worldly Goods, the Arts of Early Pennsylvania", Philadelphia Museum of Art, and "What Clothes Reveal", Baumgarten, Colonial Williamsburg. A beautiful object that would be unique in a modern or classical decor with the character of almost 250 years of history.

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Recently Discovered Portrait by Joseph Goodhue Chandler.....SOLD

Hubbardston, MA. Signed by Jospeph Goodhue Chandler and dated 1850. Oil on canvas. Having never been out of the family of descendent's of the sitter until recently found in Western New York State. A BEAUTIFUL COMBINATION OF A MOST DESIRABLE SUBJECT BY A NOTED CHILD ARTIST IN A HIGH STATE OF ORIGINALITY......An itinerant painter who was born in Massachusetts, Joseph Chandler was a typical folk artist who traveled painting portraits, but unlike many, he signed and dated his paintings on the backs of the canvases. He was especially skilled with children. He favored a deep blue dress behind one hand that held flowers, the other hand often holding a pet or object, in this case the ribbon of the child's hat. As with many folk art paintings, the image would seem to depict Miss Mary older than her three years of age. Children's portraits by Chandler are in fine museum and private collections. In ink, on back of canvas: Painted for Mifs Mary S. Gardner aged 3 years.....By J G Chandler , May, 1850.....On the stretcher: Hubbardston, Mafs Minor restoration, original frame and stretcher. Note the use of the "long S" in Miss and Mass, an early writing convention that slowly fell out of use after 1800.

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Sensational and Rare Turned Early Spill Holder.....SOLD

New England, ca. last quarter, 18th century. Maple, with thickly applied early dark green paint. Crisply turned by an accomplished wood worker, with incised lines of decoration near the rim, and a lower "knop" above a stepped base. Excellent condition with good shrinkage yet no cracks. Rich patina to the maple. Beautiful form. Impressively tall at about 6 3/8 inches x 3 3/4 diameter. Spills were typically tightly wound plant material, or textile scraps, used to transfer flame from one source to another, as in lighting a candle from the hearth. In-hand this is a special object that would thrill the collector of early American treen/woodenware. Provenance includes the American Folk Art Museum.

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Historic Early 19th Century Tavern Lantern in a Remarkable State of Originality.....SOLD

From the contents of the Silas Hastings tavern (built ca 1817 on the site of the original settler's home) in Boylston, Massachusetts. The lantern, ca. early 19th century, is in a very high state of originality (appears untouched) retaining very dry black paint on a pine domed case, the dome top fitted with sheet-tin attached via cut nails. The case also retains the four original thin-glass panels, each with a slightly greenish cast, held by tin-tabs, the door glass-panel with a thin crack. The tin candle socket, attached with cut nails, also appears to be the original, strongly indicating that this lantern received very little use, no doubt a key factor in its survival and outstanding condition. The delicate door hinges and hasp are also original, as is the turned-bale handle fitted through the dome. About 10 inches tall (not including the bale handle).

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Beautiful Pastoral Folk Art Townscape.....SOLD

View of Forestville, Chautauqua County, New York. 19th century. Oil on canvas with rich, saturated colors. The cozy picturesque village with closely knit structures wraps around a wooded square and is nestled in the valley below pristine forested hills. The artist represented the forest with an engaging "rhythm" to the trunks and leafed-canopies, the rhythm echoed in the trees that frame the foreground, and even within the clouds. The two taller foreground trees also mirror the strength and verticality of the meeting house and/or church spire. The artist has successfully portrayed a tight sense of community and pride. The painting contains abudant detail from the clock on the tower to subtle architectural elements to polychrome grasses and leaves; even several window curtains. In a high state of originality retaining its original stretcher and likely frame, never lined, two very small holes yet no restoration or in-painting. Frame size about 31 1/2 inches wide x 24 tall.

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Delightful Portrait of a Young Boy with Bird

American, ca. 1840's. Pastel on paper. Unsigned. A most pleasing little boy in a soft, quiet color palette. The boy fashionably attired in what appears to be a long sleeved "skeleton" suit, with three columns of buttons. The quiet of the portrait enhanced by the softness of the bird he holds. Somewhat unusual to find in an early portrait is that the boy wears an earring. The portrait is presented in what is likely its original period mahogany frame. The frame is so well made it is like furniture. Appealing presence with minor spots of loss about the edges and unobtrusive water stains at the bottom. Frame dimensions about 20 1/2 inches x 16 5/8.

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Paint Decorated Militia Canteen.....SALE PENDING

New England, likely Massachusetts or New Hampshire, ca. 1790-1825. Appears to be pine top and bottom and perhaps ash as the band. Untouched, honest dry original yellow-ochre paint with red banding, including the number 13, which represented the militia regiment or unit. Joinery by bold ROSEHEAD NAILS (and wooden pegs), the nails arranged in a half-moon to follow the curved end of the band, and echoed in reverse on the opposite side of the plug hole. The pride of being a member of the militia was so strong that these canteens were decoratively embellished to represent the militia in parades to accessorize their clothing and hats. Excellent, robust structural condition with just the loss of the leather strap, and expected abrasions. About 6 1/2 inch diameter x 2 3/8 tall.

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Puffy Sleeve Artist Silhouette with Brilliant Teal Dress.....SOLD

New England, ca. 1830-1835. Attributed to the celebrated "Puffy Sleeve Artist". Hollow-cut, watercolor on paper over black-fabric backing of an elegant young woman with a room-filling presence that belies its small size. The work is crisply and confidently rendered, and remains in a super state of preservation. The teal dress is likely a unique survival for this artist and elevates the work well above most related examples. Brass frame is of the period and likely original, measuring about 5 1/8 inches tall x 4 3/8 wide. See "A Loving Likeness, American Folk Portraits of the Nineteenth Century", original and supplement, for other examples attributed to the Puffy Sleeve Artist.

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Tiny Early "Fragment" Mirror

New England, ca. 1820. Sweet miniature, with original silvered glass, and dry surface on the mitered, molded frame. The glass is no longer reflective due to the elements over time impacting the silvered back, yet the original glass adds much character. Note the tiny dimensions of just 2 3/8 inches long x 1 3/8 wide. 200+ years ago silvered glass was so expensive that even tiny fragments from broken larger panels were made into mirrors. Retains collection number on back of Ted and Carole Hayward.

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Outstanding Folk Art Wallpaper Traveling Mirror/Looking Glass

Believed to be from Newburyport, MA, ca. early 19th century. Folding traveling looking glass with the names FAITH HOYT and ABIGAIL ROBERTS. Likely a hand-made gift from one to the other. Folding mirror is encased within embossed hand-blocked wallpaper, with green and blue and bittersweet coloring. Within the case is a folding mirror, with the mirror glass on the right side, and the two girls/women's names on the left. The back is of green wallpaper. Expected wear, yet good condition considering its age and delicacy. Case closed is about 5 inches long x 3 3/4 tall. Opens to about 10 inches. .

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