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Bold, Vibrant American Folk Art Rug.....SOLD

Probably New England, 19th century. The maker created a passionate work of art intended to uplift a room, to be a focal point of energy and optimism. She doubled-down on the rich red color by using several hues of red, the brightest within the woven basket from which flowers and vines rise. This basket and flowing-flowers composition was often meant to convey optimism and growth, more typically seen on theorems and watercolors. The reds are color contrasted by shades of yellow, blue, pink, blues and gray, all enclosed within a blue border. About 51 inches wide x 32 3/4 tall. Professionally mounted for hanging. See Kopp, "American Hooked and Sewn Rugs, Folk Art Underfoot" for reference. Provenance: Private New York collection.

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Elegant Wooden Peel.....SALE PENDING

Northeast America, ca 1800. Maple, in original deep dark patina. Sophisticated design for a peel having shoulder carving at the blade, and tapered handle with lollipop end. About 44 inches long. Provenance: Private Connecticut collection; Pat Guthman..

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Watercolor Portrait Miniature of a Lovely Little Girl with Cat by HENRY WALTON.....SOLD

Probably Ithaca, New York, 1836. Watercolor on paper. Labeled at the bottom on separate paper: "Nancy Ann Halsey Age 1 Yr. 1 Mth. Painted by Henry Walton 1836". Although only 1 year old at the time, Walton rendered Nancy as an older child, an approach often seen by folk artists in this period. Sweet, blue-eyed Nancy stands alongside a painted child's-size Windsor chair and her cat, flanked by a drop-leaf dining table with table rug. The bright orange of her dress and the bold, colorful floor covering give us a look into the design and colors preferred during the American Fancy Period. Note the tiny book held in her left hand, implying the importance placed on reading by her parents. Walton created this lasting image of little Nancy with exceptional skill and sensitivity, prior to the availability of photography. Henry Walton (1820-1873), lithographer and painter. Born in England in 1820. Walton immigrated to Ithaca, NY in 1836 and worked for the lithography firm of Stone and Clark. Although a largely self-taught artist, he is noted for his artistic sophistication in miniatures, landscapes, and portraits. In 1849 he joined the Gold Rush to California. Remains in bright and colorful condition. Faint shadow lines from previous framing on the extreme edges. Presented in a dry, black-painted period frame. Frame size about 8 3/4 inches x 6 1/2. On page 29 of HENRY WALTON, 19th Century American Artist, Ithaca College Museum of Art, there is a similar portrait of Herman Halsey, rendered on the same carpet, probably the brother of Nancy, and also painted in 1836.

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Early Double-Tombstone Wallbox in Original Paint.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca. 1800. Appears to be maple with white pine. Double-tombstone back crest, similar to those seen in chairs of the period over a canted well above a long drawer. The paint is original, a dark oxblood red, with thin, crystalline original over-varnish. The drawer, with thumbnail molding, is dovetailed, the case nailed. The turned pull appears original. Minor imperfections. Very sturdily constructed. May be hung or placed on a horizontal surface. About 13 5/8 inches wide x 16 1/2 tall x 6 1/2 deep. Likely held candles in the well, and tinder material for lighting them in the drawer.

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Oh What a Fragment! Tour de force of Period Carving

Possibly Hudson River Valley or New Jersey, ca. 18th century. Poplar with traces of thin blue paint. Crisply, beautifully, and deeply carved including pinwheels, central fan, and quarter fans. Ends are dovetailed, and back-bottom has a dado-channel, so this fragment appears to have been a drawer front or architectural element. About 35 1/2 inches long x 6 wide x 1 ¼ deep.

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Folk Art Parcheesi Gameboard

New England, ca. 1850-1880. Pine, with picture-frame molding joined by cut nails. The artist chose a very effective and desirable color combination of strongly contrasting colors of bittersweet and green, with a black ground, lining, and molding, and mustard cross-hatching in the center circle. An earlier game board, not one of the later examples that were more craft than art. Terrific natural patina to the back. Very good condition with expected imperfections from frequent play and a bow to the board within the frame. Applied moldings loose yet intact. Doesn’t appear to have ever been hung, yet easily mounted for hanging. Overall size of about 18 ½ inches square.

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Paint Decorated Sliding Lid Candle Box.....SOLD

Northeast America, ca. 1820-1840. Pine and poplar. Original paint decoration (and varnish) of stylized trees in black over a reddish-ground. The decoration further embellished by wisps of black. The chamfered lid slides smoothly in and out of dados in the inner side walls. Cut nail construction. Very well made; sturdy without cracks. Just about 9 inches long x 4 high x 5 1/2 deep..

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Period, Singular, Small-Size George Washington Profile Portrait....Creates an Intriguing Presence from Across a Room.....SOLD

America, ca. 1795-1810. Artist unknown. George Washington (1732-1799) profiled with hair pulled back into a ponytail and tied with ribbon, stylish in the 18th century, similar to depictions in portraits of Washington by Benjamin West, Robert Edge Pine, and James Sharples. This portrait was created in a manner I have not previously seen, and can not find another with research, i.e., reverse painted and parcel-gilt on mercury silvered glass. The glass was likely first silvered, the portrait then fashioned by removing silver to create the negative space of the image, highlighted by parcel-gilt (partial gilding) then backed with pine-pitch or black paint to contrast with the silver. Removal of the backboard reveals that the entire back of the glass is protected with a hardened wood/paper pulp. The attractive frame is original, painted black with gilt trim, and with superb patina…The sawn pine backboard is also original. The glass is exceptionally thin, indicating 18th century making. The frame is joined by un-headed sheared rectangular cut nails, typical of the transition from wrought to cut nails in the late 18th century. Given the period original frame, early and complex imaging process, and extremely thin glass, this portrait was likely created within a few years +/- of Washington’s death on December 14, 1799. The vestiges of time are evident, yet the instantly recognizable and iconic image of Washington is clear. Frame size about 11 ¾ x 9 ¾ inches. From a long time private collection of 17th/18th century Americana.

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Historically Significant “American Fancy” Interior Folk Art Painting of Mother and Son.....SOLD.

New England, ca. 1820-1835. Watercolor on wove paper. A rare glimpse into a New England country home showing seldom-seen American Fancy-Period interior features, including blue(!) moldings, yellow walls, and painted furniture in which the prevailing style valued imagination and creativity and COLOR. The young mother in full-length dress with lace-collar and bonnet seated on a red-painted bird-cage Windsor chair, her arm resting on a beautifully turned and similarly painted candle stand. Her son dressed in a blue “skeleton suit”, an outfit for small boys, popular from about 1790 to the late 1820s. Both the mother and boy conspicuously raise books, either symbolizing pride in their literacy, or perhaps they are having lessons. The frame of about 16 ¼ inches x 12 1/4 in dry black paint is period and likely original. Untouched with toning and creases. For reference, see American Fancy: Exuberance in the Arts, 1790-1840, Sumpter Priddy. Unknown artist, possibly by the same hand as that of the watercolor portrait on page 76 of “American Folk Painting” by Mary Black and Jean Lipman. Provenance: Long time private collection. A treasure rediscovered.

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Historically Important. War of 1812. Folk Art Portrait of Famous American Naval Captain James Lawrence.....SOLD

Northeastern, ca. 1815. Watercolor and ink on wove paper. Painted during a time when American’s were extremely patriotic and proud of their young country, and heroes were often the subject of art. James Lawrence was one of those heroes. His command, the frigate Chesapeake, left Boston on June 1, 1813 and immediately attacked the blockading Royal Navy frigate Shannon. During a fierce battle, the British disabled the Chesapeake. In the less than fifteen minutes of fighting, 228 men were killed or wounded in the bloodiest frigate action of the War of 1812. Captain Lawrence, mortally wounded, ordered repeatedly his famous command, “DON’T GIVE UP THE SHIP. Fight her till she sinks” and “Tell them to fire faster, don’t give up the ship.” Yet the Chesapeake was lost to a British boarding party. Friend and fellow officer Oliver Hazard Perry honored Lawrence with a large battle ensign, stitched with the phrase "DONT GIVE UP THE SHIP". Lawrence was so famous in his day that many streets, counties, cities, and naval ships are named after him. The portrait is an exceptional folk art treasure, retaining rich, saturated colors, and like a window into the feelings of that period. Lawrence is in full-dress uniform with bold gilt mounts and epaulets. He is encircled in a laurel wreath (a mark of honor), his likeness supported by crossed American flags, eagle with shield, a canon, sword, and bayonet. He grasps a highly stylized map, with compass in the upper right, the compass upside down (perhaps symbolizing distress). A water stain on the right does not impact the painted image. Presented in a later gilt-glassed shadowbox which appears to house the original black painted frame. Captioned “Capitaine Larence” and signed lower right “Fredric ___spel pinxt (painted by). Overall frame size about 13 x 11 inches. See http://blog.nyhistory.org/dont-give-up-the-ship/ for a detailed description of the battle. Private Northeast collection. .

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