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Rare and Important Patriotic Horn Cup/Beaker.....BATTLE OF BUNKER HILL HERO GENERAL JOSEPH WARREN.....SOLD

Ca. 1775-1810. Horn. Carving of General Joseph Warren, one of America's greatest heroes who was killed at the Battle of Bunker Hill on June 17, 1775. Reverse carving depicts the patriotic shield and U.S. AMERICA. Cross hatching and swags decorate the rim.....Warren, a physician, was a leader in organizing Patriots in Boston, serving as president of the revolutionary Massachusetts Provincial Congress. Dr. Warren enlisted Paul Revere and William Dawes on April 18, 1775, to spread the alarm that British troops were marching to raid Concord and to arrest rebel leaders John Hancock and Samuel Adams. Warren also participated in the Battles of Lexington and Concord. Commissioned a Major General in the colonial militia shortly before Bunker Hill, yet rather than exercising his rank, Warren served in the battle as a private soldier under Israel Putnam, and was killed when British troops stormed the redoubt atop Breed's Hill. His death was immortalized in John Trumbull's famous painting (see photo). This piece has been in private collections, the most recent public showing being at The Museum of Fine Arts, Springfield, Mass, 1976, "Bicentennial Exhibit of Furniture, Paintings and Decorative Arts 1700-1876", and is pictured in the exhibition catalogue which is included with its sale. Carved Horn cups are done in a similar technique and manner as powder horns, yet POLITICALLY INSPIRED CARVED HORN CUPS ARE EXTREMELY RARE IN COMPARISON TO EVEN THE BEST POWDER HORNS. 3 7/8 inches tall. Excellent condition.

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Early Painted Treen Lidded Tub.....SALE PENDING

Northeast America, ca. 18th to early 19th century. Fashioned from a mix of woods. Appears to be pine lid and base, open-porous wood staves, hardwood finial, and split-sapling bands. Retains worn original red paint and strong patina. The deeply-carved spiral lid, unique to my experience, fits snugly and by pressure into the staved body, with corresponding wear to the inside of the staves. The carved finial penetrates the lid by means of an integral long peg, which rides a bit loosely into the receiving hole which has expanded slightly over time from wear. The area under the finial has burnishing consistent with wear imparted by the finial. The staved sides slope inward quite significantly from the base to the lid. Early cut nails keep the sapling-straps from riding up, yet I suspect these nails were added a bit later in life to compensate for shrinkage. Small tubs like this were used to carry butter into the fields, yet could have had multiple uses. Stands about 7 inches tall to the top of the finial. Base diameter about 5 1/4 inches sloping to just 3 3/4 at the lid. The finest small early American painted treen that I have had in recent memory.

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Cooper-Made Firkin Paint Labeled G. CASSIA.....SOLD

Northeast America, ca. 1820-1840. White pine staves; probably ash handle and bands. Early nail joinery, including rose-head nails. G. (ground) Cassia is a stronger flavored version of CINNAMON, either used alone or mixed with traditional cinnamon in cooking. An early ink inscription under the lid appears to read: Pulverized Cassia 10 cents 14 lb. (wow, just 10 cents for 14 pounds, reflecting the earliness of this firkin). Also has an inscription for bark (unground Cassia). The firkin has a warm green ground original paint tending toward olive, the front beautifully painted by a professional artist, probably a coach or sign painter in gold/yellow with black shadowing. Very good condition with just minor imperfections. About 12 inches tall not including the handle. Diameter of the base about 12 inches. Diameter of the lid about 11 1/2 (a gradual taper). Spice labeled firkins or pantry boxes are scarce when compared to the large volume of unlabeled pieces. This is a terrific example.

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Outstanding Folk Art Wallpaper Traveling Mirror/Looking Glass

Believed to be from Newburyport, MA, ca. early 19th century. Folding traveling looking glass with the names FAITH HOYT and ABIGAIL ROBERTS. Likely a hand-made gift from one to the other. Folding mirror is encased within embossed hand-blocked wallpaper, with green and blue and bittersweet coloring. Within the case is a folding mirror, with the mirror glass on the right side, and the two girls/women's names on the left. The back is of green wallpaper. Expected wear, yet good condition considering its age and delicacy. Case closed is about 5 inches long x 3 3/4 tall. Opens to about 10 inches. .

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Radiant Folk Art Still Life

Northeast, possibly New York, ca. 3rd quarter, 19th century. From a long time Maine collection. Oil on academy board, the board bearing the label of W. Devoe and Company, New York. Brilliant bright, saturated colors in a most desirable flat (without shadow) folk art rendering. The white reticulated ceramic compote provides an appealing balance to the contrasting colors and random forms of the fruits. The overflowing quantity of fruit symbolizes abundance and optimism. Excellent condition with just a bit of roughness in the lower right. Set within a bold gilded frame that is likely original and beautifully presents the vibrant work. Frame size about 33 1/2 inches wide x 27 1/2 tall; sight size about 23 1/4 x 17 1/2. This painting would brighten and enliven, and is large enough to carry a signficant wall.

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Miniature Turned Bowl Retaining Original Paint History

Probably New England. ca. 1800. Appears to be pine. A miniature example with wonderful shrinkage and retaining early green and black paint over the first red wash or sizing, and remnants of an old oyster white in the interior. Very thinly turned, with chamfered rim and raised foot. Tight shrinkage checks in base. Diameter varies from 5 3/16 inches across the grain; 5 7/16 with the grain (1/4 inch shrinkage). Height varies from 1 5/8 inches to 1 15/16. Miniature turned wooden bowls were seldom made after the early 19th century as they were obsoleted by emerging ceramics and pottery, which were cheaper to make. Large wooden bowls continued to be made for many years as their ceramic equivalents would have been too heavy.

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Sliding Lid Box with Unusual "Checkerboard" Design.....SALE PENDING

Northeast America, ca. 1840. Appears to be pine and poplar. Cut nail joinery, robustly made. Excellent paint. Quite striking original red and black painted squares and rectangles, the red paint, depending on lighting, tending toward bittersweet. Well used as evidenced by the authetic period wear around the thumb hold, indicating frequent usage, perhaps for candles or spices. Nice complement to a gameboard collection. About 10 3/4 inches long x 3 1/2 wide x 3 1/8 tall.

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Paint Decorated Frame.....SALE PENDING

Northeast America, ca. 1830-1840. Original paint simulating crotch mahogany on pine. Excellent for housing a fine period folk art painting, or as art by itself. Excellent structural condition; minor abrasions as shown. Outside dimensions about 16 1/4 inches x 14 1/2; sight size 11 3/8 x 9 1/2; rabbet (max dimensions of artwork that it will hold) about 12 1/8 x 10 1/8. Retains original brass hanging hook.

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