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Charming Folk Art Signed Watercolor of Yellow and Blue Birds

New England, ca. 1820. Watercolor and ink on wove paper. Delightfully folky yet sophisticated in its simplicity. Facing yellow birds with blue wings, black eyes, and brown legs are separated by sprigs or green, all on lush green ground. Signed underneath (note the long ‘S’), in what appears to read: “Mifs Francis Hollister”____ “M. A Watson”. Likely a Reward of Merit to Francis from her teacher. Housed in a oyster-white painted ripple frame with gold liner. Frame size about 9 3/8 inches x 7 1/2.

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Folk Art Parcheesi Gameboard

New England, ca. 1850-1880. Pine, with picture-frame molding joined by cut nails. The artist chose a very effective and desirable color combination of strongly contrasting colors of bittersweet and green, with a black ground, lining, and molding, and mustard cross-hatching in the center circle. An earlier game board, not one of the later examples that were more craft than art. Terrific natural patina to the back. Very good condition with expected imperfections from frequent play and a bow to the board within the frame. Applied moldings loose yet intact. Doesn’t appear to have ever been hung, yet easily mounted for hanging. Overall size of about 18 ½ inches square.

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Painted Wooden Bottle BOX.....SALE PENDING

Likely Pennsylvania, 19th century. Original dry red and gold paint on what appears to be popler. Lathe turned. Cleverly separates at a seam about one-third the height. Subtle wavy paint decoration in black. Stamped underneath, in part “DIST PA” (assumning PA is for Pennsylvania). Unknown application, yet unusual form and appealing. Perhaps used for "hiding" valuables "in plain sight" similar to faux-books, yet the stamp underneath may suggest a more specific intent. Superb condition and desirable surface. Solidly made. About 11 1/2 inches tall x 3 3/8 diameter at base. . .

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Special Oval Signed and Dated Butter Print.....SOLD

Pennsylvania, likely area near Ephrate/Lititz. Signed J. Huhn, dated 1853. Appears to be maple with terrific color. Very deeply carved tulip flanked by flowers or stars. Turned handle joined by nails about the perimeter. Oval body with chamfered edges. Very similar, and likely by the same hand, as the one pictured in " Butter Prints and Molds," by Paul Kindig, pg. 70 Figure 51 a & 51b. About 6 1/8 inches long x 3 3/4 wide x 3 tall including the handle. Provenance: private New England collection; David Wheatcroft. They don’t get much better than this.

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Carved and Articulated Dancing Figure.....SALE PENDING

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, ca. late 19th century. Especially well-done example carved from wood in original paint and retaining long curly hair. The high boots anchor black paints with striped-high collar shirt, and boller hat. The hat and shirt accented with red-paint ribbon and tie. Excellent condition. The figure itself about 9 inches tall (11 1/2 including stand). The quality of the carving, and the striped shirt with boller hat really elevate this example. Provenance: Private collection for the past 25+ years. Ex: Chris Machmer.

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Folky Young Man Portrait

New England, ca. 1820-1840. Oil on canvas. A most handsome young man (that FACE!) with characteristics that we folk art collectors love. Portraits can be so naive that there is little artistic skill, or so academic that they require an equally academic, formal setting. Yet this portrait falls on the "sweet-spot" of that naive-to-academic continuum. His face is mostly without shadow leading to stylized-combed hair presenting like waves. His black coat and white shirt/collar, and simple background combined with his confident gaze give this painting a clean and uncomplicated aesthetic. It has survived in sensational condition. About 26 inches tall x 24 wide. Gilded frame-liner appears original. He's terrific.

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Historically Important. War of 1812. Folk Art Portrait of Famous American Naval Captain James Lawrence.....SOLD

Northeastern, ca. 1815. Watercolor and ink on wove paper. Painted during a time when American’s were extremely patriotic and proud of their young country, and heroes were often the subject of art. James Lawrence was one of those heroes. His command, the frigate Chesapeake, left Boston on June 1, 1813 and immediately attacked the blockading Royal Navy frigate Shannon. During a fierce battle, the British disabled the Chesapeake. In the less than fifteen minutes of fighting, 228 men were killed or wounded in the bloodiest frigate action of the War of 1812. Captain Lawrence, mortally wounded, ordered repeatedly his famous command, “DON’T GIVE UP THE SHIP. Fight her till she sinks” and “Tell them to fire faster, don’t give up the ship.” Yet the Chesapeake was lost to a British boarding party. Friend and fellow officer Oliver Hazard Perry honored Lawrence with a large battle ensign, stitched with the phrase "DONT GIVE UP THE SHIP". Lawrence was so famous in his day that many streets, counties, cities, and naval ships are named after him. The portrait is an exceptional folk art treasure, retaining rich, saturated colors, and like a window into the feelings of that period. Lawrence is in full-dress uniform with bold gilt mounts and epaulets. He is encircled in a laurel wreath (a mark of honor), his likeness supported by crossed American flags, eagle with shield, a canon, sword, and bayonet. He grasps a highly stylized map, with compass in the upper right, the compass upside down (perhaps symbolizing distress). A water stain on the right does not impact the painted image. Presented in a later gilt-glassed shadowbox which appears to house the original black painted frame. Captioned “Capitaine Larence” and signed lower right “Fredric ___spel pinxt (painted by). Overall frame size about 13 x 11 inches. See http://blog.nyhistory.org/dont-give-up-the-ship/ for a detailed description of the battle. Private Northeast collection. .

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Important William and Mary Lighting Stand in Cherry and Cherry-Burl.....SOLD

Northeast America, likely New England, possibly Connecticut River Valley, ca. 1720-1740. Baluster-turned double candle holder moveable on cherry-wood column supported by a bold exceedingly rare cherry-burl base with ring-turned top and incised lines. The column is surmounted by an acorn finial, a symbol of Huguenot-craftsman and representing many positive attributes, including: life, power, longevity, new growth, good luck, and as a heraldic symbol “independence to its bearer”, and “great oaks from little acorns grow”. Retains period candles. Stands a majestic 29 inches tall. Pictured/described “North American Burl Treen”, Powers, 2005. Provenance: About 1970-2002 Clarke Garrett; then David Good. HAPPY TO EMAIL HIGH RES PHOTOS.

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A Superior Carved, Inlaid, and Dated Presentation Mallet.....SOLD

Probably Northwest Europe, likely by a French or Dutch master woodworker. Dated 1829, signed “K.H.”. Boxwood or fruitwood. Extraordinary surface with rich color. One side skillfully carved with a 5-lobe shell centering foliate vining that stands proud of the surface, below a star of inlaid horn, all enclosed within a punch-decorated border. The reverse also with horn inlay and punched borders with raised flowers presenting the date and initials. The turned handle with incised lines and decorative carving, terminating in a brass hanging loop. About 15 inches long x 4 ½ maximum width and the top of the head, and about 2 inches thick (slightly domed on each side). Loss of some horn on one side as shown, otherwise exceptional condition…..The success of this piece can not be overstated. For the true lover of early woodworking. HAPPY TO EMAIL HIGH RES PHOTOS.

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AMERICAN FOLK SCULPTURE: Sensational Folk Art Carved and Painted Owl.....SOLD

A choice example of American folk sculpture. Northeast, 19th century. All original. Very lifelike. Oozing with character. Skillfully hand-carved wood (probably pine), including the curved beak and “horns”. Dry polychrome paint decoration, the warmly colored underbelly particularly appealing. Note the carved and painted deep-set eyes. May have been mounted in a barn to scare off rodents and other birds. Significant scale at about 14 ½ inches tall to the top of the ears.; 6 1/2 inches deep from the base of the tail to the tip of the beak. Base is about 7 ½ wide. Provenance: Private Northeast collection. A standout within a historic or contemporary setting. High resolution photos available.

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