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OUTSTANDING Folk Portrait of a Sidewinder Paddlesteamer Sailing Ship

American, ca. 1840-1860. Oil on canvas. Steam-powered sidewinder sailing ships first came into service about 1840. Initially, these ships were only marginally faster than wind-powered clipper sailing-ships and were prone to mechanical failure and fuel shortage. As such, these early paddlewheeler's were typically fitted with a full complement of masts, rigging, and sails due to the captain's mistrust of the new steam technology......By about 1860, technology improved to the point that they were reliable enough (and now significantly faster than sailing-ships) such that the sailing apparatus, including spare sails, rope, and all things needed to sail were eliminated. A benefit of eliminating sails and support supplies was that there was now more space for passengers and the storage of materials for their comfort and other amenities......This painting is a superb depiction of one of these early hybrid sailing and sidewinder ships. Note the beautiful eagle figurehead (sailors "believed" that the sharp eyes of the eagle would be constantly on the lookout for perilous shoals), and the large anchor attached to the side. A bold American flag alerts of the captain's pride. The ship cuts cleanly through wind-swept seas. The warm tone of the sky is well balanced by the aqua-green of the swirling waters, with dashes of color from flags, figurehead, and anchor......Terrific condition, with very minor in-painting. Chamfered black painted frame appeaers original (with a bit of repair on the lower frame edge). Overall frame size is 35.75 x 25.25 inches. Sight size is 29.25 x 19 inches.....Provenance: Important New England collection, and previously Stephen-Douglas; Robert Thayer.

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AMERICAN FOLK SCULPTURE: Sensational Folk Art Carved and Painted Owl.....SALE PENDING

A choice example of American folk sculpture. Northeast, 19th century. All original. Very lifelike. Oozing with character. Skillfully hand-carved wood (probably pine), including the curved beak and “horns”. Dry polychrome paint decoration, the warmly colored underbelly particularly appealing. Note the carved and painted deep-set eyes. May have been mounted in a barn to scare off rodents and other birds. Significant scale at about 14 ½ inches tall to the top of the ears.; 6 1/2 inches deep from the base of the tail to the tip of the beak. Base is about 7 ½ wide. Provenance: Private Northeast collection. A standout within a historic or contemporary setting. High resolution photos available.

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Whimsically Paint-Decorated Sharpening Box.....SALE PENDING

Northeast America, New England or Pennsylvania, ca. 1830.. Pine. Crisply made with a fine dovetailed case. Vivid, dry, paint decoration of blue-green serpentine swaths on a barn-red ground with whimsical trailing salmon-colored dots. The sliding lid with thumbnail molded sides above sliding dados. The top of the lid has always been fitted with a leather strip, presumably used to sharpen blades or knives. Its all about the paint decoration: Unusually delightful folk art paint. About 11 1/2 inches long x 3 wide x 2 7/8 tall.

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Full Length Profile Portrait of Little 4-Year Old Boy John Smith and his Wheelbarrow. JH Davis.

New England. Likely Maine or New Hampshire. Dated 1837. Confidently attributed to Joseph H. Davis, active 1832-1837. Of exceptional appeal and character. Watercolor, pencil, and probably gum arabic (to provide detail to the black clothing) on woven paper. The inclusion of the wheelbarrow is charming and is probably unique to surviving Davis' works. John wears a black coat with brass buttons over trousers, with frilly collar. Note the tiny feet. Inscription across the base reads: "John H. Smith. Aged 4 Feb 12th, 1838. Painted December 1837". Excellent condition with expected paper toning. Overall frame size about 7 ¾ inches x 6 3/8. Provenance: Prominent Midwestern Collection.

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Striking Folk Art House Portrait.....SOLD

Found in Maine and very likely painted there, ca. 1840-1860. Oil on canvas board. A most appealing image capturing a pre-Civil War home, with white-walls, brick-red roofing, and bold black window openings and door. The home is framed by a young tree on the left and a pathway smartly angling past the front of the home, intersected by two walkways . The distant hills and valley provide depth and context. The painting would have been commissioned to record the finery of the new home, yet today is a terrific piece of folk art with a composition and colors that speak to a gifted, even if untrained, artist. Fitted to a deeply molded 19th century frame with white-yellow paint that presents the work well. Excellent condition with minor touch-ups; expected craquelure as shown. Substantial scale with overall frame size about 31 inches wide x 25 tall. Eye-catching! HAPPY TO EMAIL HIGH RES PHOTOS.

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Unique Painted Stool with Indian/Colonial America Story

Northeast America, appears to be dated 1859 (or 1849). Original paint decoration on pine. The primary figure is a native American male holding a sizeable bow. He is flanked by smaller vignettes that include: a church or meetinghouse with weathervane at the top of the tall spire; Indian (dancing?), Colonial figure with rifle; rooster, a huntsman firing on a rabbit; a fish; and songbird. The image would seem to tell the story of life on the frontier and the cohabitation of Native American and frontiersmen. About 12 1/4 inches long x 6 1/2 tall x 6 3/4 deep. A utilitarian object elevated to a very intriguing folk art historical narrative that merits further research and interpretation..

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Vibrant, Graphic Paint Store Trade Sign.....SOLD

Northeast America, ca. 19th century. Vivid and fun and fresh. Unconventional form. Original paint and over-varnish on hardwood in the form of three graduated, stacked paint-barrels with highly-stylized black lettering, with shadowing, on background colors of green, mustard, and blue, each wrapped with silver-cream bands and red trim. The colors wrap around the sides. The sign is double-sided, yet the back is more worn. A bracket on the top enables it to be easily hung. Its vertical format allows it to be positioned on a narrow wall. Included with the sign is its original pine shipping crate, bearing the stencil FROM/JOHN LUCAS & CO/PHILA, NEW YORK, CHICAGO…..The back story of John Lucas is very appealing. Originally a paint maker from England, he established his paint company in Gibbsboro, NJ in 1842 where he pioneered new ways to make paints. In the late 19th century he patented the first ready-to-use paint products, especially for colorful Victorian houses, and created new pigment colors that were also much more environmentally safe. His social conscience and financial success led him to being a noted Philanthropist, building Gibbsboro into a dynamic and thriving village. Superb structural condition with minor paint losses and abrasions. Maximum dimensions about 49 inches tall x 17 1/4 wide. Provenance: Prominent Midwest collection..

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“MR BOYD” (Jasper Miles). A Pair of Small Profile Portraits on Wooden Panels of an Attractive Young Couple.....SOLD

Likely Ohio, New York State, or Pennsylvania, ca. 1830-1840. For many years portraits by this artist were attributed to "Mr Boyd". Recent research has now identified “Mr Boyd” as actually Jasper Miles (1782-1849). See Magazine Antiques, July/August 2016 for the research by David Allaway, "Jasper Miles-19th c. Portrait Artist". As is characteristic with other examples by Miles, this pair is oil paint on wooden panels (probably poplar), the panels about nine by seven inches; they have an extraordinary attention to detail in the hair, which is drawn in miniaturist technique with a sharp-pointed brush; and there is a distinctive horn-shaped shading to the inner ear (look closely at the man’s ear). The man has an upright posture, and his far arm is suggested simply by a triangle. As with others of this period, the ovals have rough edges that would be concealed by a cardboard or √©glomis√© mat, and one can see Miles’ color tests and/or brush cleaning outside the image area. Both sitters’ clothing shows subtle, extensive detail, while the lovely young lady’s portrait is enhanced by the splash of color from yellow ribbons in her lace bonnet and her salmon shawl. Note the gentleman’s tie in the form of a bow, his high collar, double-breasted coat, and swept-aside hair part, all high-style for this period. Excellent condition with exceedingly minor retouch to background. Frames are contemporary, made to fit these profiles several decades ago. Overall frame sizes about 11 inches x 9 1/4. Provenance: Long-time Private Collection from Peter Tillou. HAPPY TO EMAIL HIGH RES PHOTOS.

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Moses Ogden Face Sculpture.....SOLD

Angelica, New York, ca. late 19th century. Civil War veteran and sculpture who carved using the “spirit of the trees”. After the Civil War, Ogden lived out his life in the wilds of western New York where he carved whimsical animals and faces from burls, allowing the natural wood growth to dictate the shape and subject of each piece. Postcards show Ogden selling his carvings at a county fair, and photographs show his home as a "Wonderland" filled with sculptures. A mild-mannered furniture and wagon builder by day, but by night he was a warlock. His thing was to go into the woods, find fallen trees that contained monsters, drag them home and set the monsters free. This is a remarkable example of his work of a lady, the contours and figure of the wood clearly employed to communicate facial features and personality.

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A Unique Survivor: Early Carved Peahen Weathervane

Northeast America, ca. late 18th /to early 19th century. Likely Cedar wood, retaining traces of early sage green paint on its beautifully patinated weathered surface. Remarkably, this weathervane is made from a roof-shingle, thicker on the edge of the hen’s head/belly, tapering to very thin at the sawtooth tail. Retains original iron strap onto which the vane was mounted. In addition to weather, this vane survived multiple target shots, with bullet holes shaped in an upward orientation, indicating it was shot while in place at the top of a building or pole. One of these bullets caused a horizontal crack repaired long ago with hide glue. There is also a loss at the top of the middle back, also happened long ago as evidenced by the unchanging dark patina. Feather light and easily wall hung with a custom mount (included). Dimensions about 25 inches from the tip of the beak to the furthest tail point x 9 inches tall. About ½ inch thick at the body, and only 1/8 at the tail end. Provenance: Personal collection of the distinguished dealer Harry Hartman. Pictured in Hartman’s collection, in 1984, in the book “Baskets” by Nancy Schiffer, page 10. HAPPY TO EMAIL HIGH RES PHOTOS.

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