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Folk Art Parcheesi Gameboard

New England, ca. 1860 to 1875. A colorful country example with a folk-art aesthetic that is more appealing than many of the professionally produced examples. Original dry paint on what appears to be basswood. Folding form with original hinges, with breadboard ends joined by cut nails. Dry, alligatored painted surface. Note how the corner-circles rotate in color position, an unexpected feature that provides movement and energy. About 22 inches x 21.

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Historically Significant “American Fancy” Interior Folk Art Painting of Mother and Son.....SOLD.

New England, ca. 1820-1835. Watercolor on wove paper. A rare glimpse into a New England country home showing seldom-seen American Fancy-Period interior features, including blue(!) moldings, yellow walls, and painted furniture in which the prevailing style valued imagination and creativity and COLOR. The young mother in full-length dress with lace-collar and bonnet seated on a red-painted bird-cage Windsor chair, her arm resting on a beautifully turned and similarly painted candle stand. Her son dressed in a blue “skeleton suit”, an outfit for small boys, popular from about 1790 to the late 1820s. Both the mother and boy conspicuously raise books, either symbolizing pride in their literacy, or perhaps they are having lessons. The frame of about 16 ¼ inches x 12 1/4 in dry black paint is period and likely original. Untouched with toning and creases. For reference, see American Fancy: Exuberance in the Arts, 1790-1840, Sumpter Priddy. Unknown artist, possibly by the same hand as that of the watercolor portrait on page 76 of “American Folk Painting” by Mary Black and Jean Lipman. Provenance: Long time private collection. A treasure rediscovered.

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Very Nice 19th C. Hanging Basket in Original Green Paint.....SOLD

New England, ca. mid 19th century. Hand-cut Ash wood splint in original dry green paint. Fixed handle. Wrapped double-rim. The basket back and sides canted such that while hanging the contents are easier to access. Excellent condition with minor imperfections. About 11 inches wide x 6 tall (7 3/4 to top of handle). Provenance: Private collection; Hollis Broderick.

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Scarce Embroidered Table Rug

American, ca. 3rd quarter, 19th century. Hand embroidery (not hooked) on wool ground. One of the scarcer American folk art forms, the table rug was a 19th century expression that was used to decorate the tops of tables and chests (too much effort in making to be placed underfoot). As a symbol of plenty and optimism, this lively composition depicts flowers boldly bursting from a vase, the vines wrapping around the edges as a border. Warm earth tones punctuated by splashes of red and blue. Dye colors remain strong; scattered losses to embroideries and small unobtrusive background holes. Strong visual impact. Just 22 x 15 inches. Mounted for display. Please ask for high res images.

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Full Length Profile Portrait of Little 4-Year Old Boy John Smith and his Wheelbarrow. JH Davis.

New England. Likely Maine or New Hampshire. Dated 1837. Confidently attributed to Joseph H. Davis, active 1832-1837. Of exceptional appeal and character. Watercolor, pencil, and probably gum arabic (to provide detail to the black clothing) on woven paper. The inclusion of the wheelbarrow is charming and is probably unique to surviving Davis' works. John wears a black coat with brass buttons over trousers, with frilly collar. Note the tiny feet. Inscription across the base reads: "John H. Smith. Aged 4 Feb 12th, 1838. Painted December 1837". Excellent condition with expected paper toning. Overall frame size about 7 ¾ inches x 6 3/8. Provenance: Prominent Midwestern Collection.

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Richly Carved Early Spoon Rack

Likely New Jersey or New York State's Hudson River Valley, ca. 18th century. Pine or poplar. Original paint history of dry 19th century "Spanish Brown" over the first sage green. An exceptional example of the carver's skill, with the outer profile of the board shaped with gouge, not sawn. Profusely and deeply carved within the profile with stylized pinwheels the dominant feature. The spoon rails are joined with rosehead/T-head nails. The back in patina showing jack-plane tool marks. Diminutive size at about 18 1/4 inches tall x 8 3/4 wide x 1 3/4 deep at the rails. The depth and full coverage of the carvings gives movement, energy, and variety as changing lighting impacts the shadowing. In-period this object was cherished as a means to store and display valued spoons.

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Diminutive TRUE Early American Chandelier......SOLD

New England, ca. 1770-1810. Amont the rarest of all survivors in early American lighting. Stately, proud, uncomplicated presence. In a choice state of originality including the lemon-shaped turned wooden “hub” in dry crusty mustard paint, six rod-iron arms (branches), beautifully crimped-tin drip trays surmounted by tin candlecups, each containing a period candle. Also retains its thin iron hanging rod terminating in a hook for easy hanging. Outside diameter (from outer edges of opposing candle cups) about 16 inches; height about 20 inches (which includes about 13 inches for the hanging iron rod). The lemon hub is about 7 inches tall; each drip pan about 3 3/4 inches diameter. Finest condition despite insignificant hairline shrinkage checks to the wooden hub. See EARLY LIGHTING, the Rushlight Club, page 27 for related examples. Provenance: 30 years ago Hollis Brodrick; private collection until recently.

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Authentic Rooster Weathervane in Exceptional Surface

Northeast America, ca. late 19th century. Full body-form of molded copper, copper tubing, and bold cast iron arrow point to give the leading edge weight. The well defined features elevated by a complex weathered surface with remnants of original yellow sizing and rich blue-green verdigris surface. Terrific crisp condition; a few early buckshot impressions that did not penetrate. A weathervane to be proud of. In a custom stand. Dimensions about 22 1/2 inches tall x 25 long x 3 deep. HAPPY TO EMAIL HIGH RES PHOTOS

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Paint Decorated Fire Bucket

Marthas’s Vineyard, or Goshen, Massachusetts (near Deerfield), dated 1836. Original paint on stitched leather. Banner reads “FREEMAN COFFIN” (1786-1854) who was born on Martha’s Vineyard but likely moved to Goshen later. The Coffin “whaling” family is well known throughout early New England. The paint decoration represents the strong, vibrant “American Fancy” colors popular during this period. Structural superb condition including the original handle. Paint wear as shown, perhaps from usage in a real fire event. Stands straight at about 12 3/4 inches tall not including handle. Attractively priced!

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"THE BRIDGE" BY THOMAS CHAMBERS.....SOLD

New York or New England, ca. mid-19th century. Oil on canvas. Thomas Chambers (1808-1869), described as America's "first modern", is well known for highly imaginative paintings characterized by areas of bright, flat color, large generalized forms, and sharp contrasts between light and dark areas, with playful, romantic exaggerations that reflected the "fancy" taste of his prosperous patrons in New York and New England. "The Bridge" is a tranquil, yet boldly colored painting, with color palette typical of Chambers' work, following a horse and rider trotting over a fanciful bridge spanning a calm river, the peacefulness of the scene accentuated by wading cattle and drifting sail boats. The composition leads the eye under the bridge to wonder what is unseen up the river. This painting is in excellent condition. Lined. The fine gilded frame appears to be the original, as is the stretcher. Frame size about 28 inches wide x 22 tall. A very hard to read saved label from the back of the canvas warrants further research. Museums with paintings by Chambers include: Addison Gallery of American Art, American Folk Art Museum, Dallas Museum of Art, Everson Museum of Art, Fenimore Art Museum, Flint Institute of Arts, Indiana University Art Museum, Mead Art Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, National Gallery of Art, New-York Historical Society, Rhode Island School of Design, Saint Louis Art Museum, Shelburne Museum, Smith College Museum of Art, The Brooklyn Museum of Art, and the Wadsworth Atheneum. See "Thomas Chambers: American Marine and Landscape Painter, 1808-1869", Foster, for extensive reference.

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