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Historically Significant “American Fancy” Interior Folk Art Painting of Mother and Son.....SOLD.

New England, ca. 1820-1835. Watercolor on wove paper. A rare glimpse into a New England country home showing seldom-seen American Fancy-Period interior features, including blue(!) moldings, yellow walls, and painted furniture in which the prevailing style valued imagination and creativity and COLOR. The young mother in full-length dress with lace-collar and bonnet seated on a red-painted bird-cage Windsor chair, her arm resting on a beautifully turned and similarly painted candle stand. Her son dressed in a blue “skeleton suit”, an outfit for small boys, popular from about 1790 to the late 1820s. Both the mother and boy conspicuously raise books, either symbolizing pride in their literacy, or perhaps they are having lessons. The frame of about 16 ¼ inches x 12 1/4 in dry black paint is period and likely original. Untouched with toning and creases. For reference, see American Fancy: Exuberance in the Arts, 1790-1840, Sumpter Priddy. Unknown artist, possibly by the same hand as that of the watercolor portrait on page 76 of “American Folk Painting” by Mary Black and Jean Lipman. Provenance: Long time private collection. A treasure rediscovered.

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Rare AMERICAN Courting Mirror. Original Glass and Red Paint....SOLD

New England, ca. 1780. Maple frame with white pine backboards (separate backboard for mirror glass and reverse-painted crest glass). Original very dry red paint and original mirror glass. Ship-lapped corner-joinery secured by wooden pins. The flat-arched crest centered by a reverse-painted glass panel. Richly patinated chamfered backboards. Glue blocks added long ago to back of crest for reinforcement of an ancient small crack in the crest-frame; another small ancient crack on extreme lower left of glass. About 16 inches tall x 10 wide. Few courting mirrors of American origin are known. Provenance: Private collection; formerly collection of Susan and Ray Egan who purchased it from Pam Boynton, who found it decades ago in Lunenberg, Massachusetts.

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Scarce Embroidered Table Rug

American, ca. 3rd quarter, 19th century. Hand embroidery (not hooked) on wool ground. One of the scarcer American folk art forms, the table rug was a 19th century expression that was used to decorate the tops of tables and chests (too much effort in making to be placed underfoot). As a symbol of plenty and optimism, this lively composition depicts flowers boldly bursting from a vase, the vines wrapping around the edges as a border. Warm earth tones punctuated by splashes of red and blue. Dye colors remain strong; scattered losses to embroideries and small unobtrusive background holes. Strong visual impact. Just 22 x 15 inches. Mounted for display. Please ask for high res images.

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Full Length Profile Portrait of Little 4-Year Old Boy John Smith and his Wheelbarrow. JH Davis.

New England. Likely Maine or New Hampshire. Dated 1837. Confidently attributed to Joseph H. Davis, active 1832-1837. Of exceptional appeal and character. Watercolor, pencil, and probably gum arabic (to provide detail to the black clothing) on woven paper. The inclusion of the wheelbarrow is charming and is probably unique to surviving Davis' works. John wears a black coat with brass buttons over trousers, with frilly collar. Note the tiny feet. Inscription across the base reads: "John H. Smith. Aged 4 Feb 12th, 1838. Painted December 1837". Excellent condition with expected paper toning. Overall frame size about 7 ¾ inches x 6 3/8. Provenance: Prominent Midwestern Collection.

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Richly Carved Early Spoon Rack

Likely New Jersey or New York State's Hudson River Valley, ca. 18th century. Pine or poplar. Original paint history of dry 19th century "Spanish Brown" over the first sage green. An exceptional example of the carver's skill, with the outer profile of the board shaped with gouge, not sawn. Profusely and deeply carved within the profile with stylized pinwheels the dominant feature. The spoon rails are joined with rosehead/T-head nails. The back in patina showing jack-plane tool marks. Diminutive size at about 18 1/4 inches tall x 8 3/4 wide x 1 3/4 deep at the rails. The depth and full coverage of the carvings gives movement, energy, and variety as changing lighting impacts the shadowing. In-period this object was cherished as a means to store and display valued spoons.

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Diminutive TRUE Early American Chandelier......SOLD

New England, ca. 1770-1810. Amont the rarest of all survivors in early American lighting. Stately, proud, uncomplicated presence. In a choice state of originality including the lemon-shaped turned wooden “hub” in dry crusty mustard paint, six rod-iron arms (branches), beautifully crimped-tin drip trays surmounted by tin candlecups, each containing a period candle. Also retains its thin iron hanging rod terminating in a hook for easy hanging. Outside diameter (from outer edges of opposing candle cups) about 16 inches; height about 20 inches (which includes about 13 inches for the hanging iron rod). The lemon hub is about 7 inches tall; each drip pan about 3 3/4 inches diameter. Finest condition despite insignificant hairline shrinkage checks to the wooden hub. See EARLY LIGHTING, the Rushlight Club, page 27 for related examples. Provenance: 30 years ago Hollis Brodrick; private collection until recently.

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Handsome “High Country” Painted Wallbox with Tabbed-Lollipop.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca. late 18th century. Pine, basswood, and perhaps poplar, the case joined by T-head nails, having a lollipop-topped backboard (with extending tab) over a deep well and drawer below. The appealing form is elevated further by beautiful, crazed 19th century red paint and over-varnish covering much of the first 18th century thin black paint. The well sides and front are carved into a pleasing shape (the lower notch perhaps for resting a clay pipe) the tooling of the carver still well evident. The drawer is stoutly made, dovetailed and nailed, retaining the original turned-wood pull. Backboard and underside have strong patina. A well-made box, sturdily constructed. About 19 inches tall x 6 wide x 5 deep (not including the pull). Likely a pipe box, with the drawer for tinder. May be hung, or rests on a chest or shelf.

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American Revolution Soldier's Inkwell.....SALE PENDING

Probably New England, ca. 18th century. Carved from soapstone; engraved underneath with the period incription “Matthias Cazier”, who was born in New Castle, Delaware in 1752. He served three years in the colonial American army during the Revolution. Matthias graduated from Princeton (may have also attended Dartmouth) after the war as a minister, later residing in the south, then Crane's Corners-New Jersey, Castleton-Vermont, Salem-Connecticut, and New York State. About 2 7/8 inches diameter x 1 3/8 tall. Small but weighty/substantial. Incurved side walls with radiating lines about the well and three holes into which the quill pen would be inserted. The signature makes special this already neat little piece. Perhaps Matthias was proud of that he could read and write in a time when many could not, hence the signature on the inkwell. Excellent period condition with expected usage wear and minor flaking.

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"THE BRIDGE" BY THOMAS CHAMBERS.....SALE PENDING

New York or New England, ca. mid-19th century. Oil on canvas. Thomas Chambers (1808-1869), described as America's "first modern", is well known for highly imaginative paintings characterized by areas of bright, flat color, large generalized forms, and sharp contrasts between light and dark areas, with playful, romantic exaggerations that reflected the "fancy" taste of his prosperous patrons in New York and New England. "The Bridge" is a tranquil, yet boldly colored painting, with color palette typical of Chambers' work, following a horse and rider trotting over a fanciful bridge spanning a calm river, the peacefulness of the scene accentuated by wading cattle and drifting sail boats. The composition leads the eye under the bridge to wonder what is unseen up the river. This painting is in excellent condition. Lined. The fine gilded frame appears to be the original, as is the stretcher. Frame size about 28 inches wide x 22 tall. A very hard to read saved label from the back of the canvas warrants further research. Museums with paintings by Chambers include: Addison Gallery of American Art, American Folk Art Museum, Dallas Museum of Art, Everson Museum of Art, Fenimore Art Museum, Flint Institute of Arts, Indiana University Art Museum, Mead Art Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, National Gallery of Art, New-York Historical Society, Rhode Island School of Design, Saint Louis Art Museum, Shelburne Museum, Smith College Museum of Art, The Brooklyn Museum of Art, and the Wadsworth Atheneum. See "Thomas Chambers: American Marine and Landscape Painter, 1808-1869", Foster, for extensive reference.

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RARE, VIVID Folk Art Street View.....SALE PENDING

19th century historical folk art street scenes, especially of this caliber, are scarce. They portray of the pride of the artist in their town. Shown is Albany (Market Street, from State Street to Maiden Lane.), New York. Oil on canvas. Painted by Anne Wrightson (born 1829), emulating in oil paints the watercolor/pencil drawing by James Eights created from his memory of living in Albany in 1805. The scene shows the cohesiveness of the neighborhood reflected in the continuity of architecture and brick-red paint, flanked by the mustard house on the left and a blue open structure on the right. The substantial square, paved with flat stones, shows smartly attired gentlemen sporting walking sticks, and a bonneted-lady in foreground carrying baskets under each arm. More structures can be seen in the distance, one appearing to have a large statue or weathervane surmounting a high cupola. The buildings are rendered with extensive detailing, including clapboards, window panes, steps and rails, and cellar doors. Miss Wrightson was a graduate of the Albany female academy and Lowell Institute. With her sister Harriet, she led a private school for girls on Maiden Lane and Chapel Street, near the location of this painting. The drawings by James Eights that inspired this painting are pictured in the Magazine Antiques, May, 1948. Presented in a walnut frame with gilt liner of the period of about 21 inches x 14; sight size 16 1/2 x 9 1/2. Condition is exceptional, with no restoration.

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