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Beautiful 17th Century Candlestick of Remarkable Scale and Condition. Marked......SOLD

Nuremberg, ca. 1650. Brass of superior quality and superb craftsmanship, both a hallmark of Nuremberg makers in this period, with an impressive size that dwarfs most others of this form. In two parts, the thin, finely turned broad bell base supporting an integral dished round mid-drip pan, fitted with a screw-threaded baluster-turned post and cylindrical candle cup which is capped by an downward sweeping bobeche. The base, drip-pan, and candle-cup decorated by incised lines. Maker's mark X on the drip pan edge. Condition is sensational without cracks, with just a very slight lean to the post, and a very small foundry patch (in the making) under the drip pan. Across-the-room presence at 8 1/2 inches tall with base diameter of a surprising 6 1/2. See Old Domestic Base-Metal Candlesticks, Michaelis. page 65, and Antique Brass Candlesticks, 1450-1750, Grove, pp. 24-25, for very similar examples. The most impressive example of this form I have seen.

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Bold, Bright, and Beautiful American Theorem

Probably New England, ca. 1830. Paint (oil) on cotton-velvet. Unusally impressive and dramatic, with rich, saturated colors featuring a woven basket on a green table, the basket overflowing with flowers and leaves. Note especially the stylized sun flower upper left, and the little blue bird at the top. The details keep coming, from the fine weave of the basket to the leaf tendrils to the shaded flower petals; and even an unopened rose bud. The art fills the space with a feeling of abundance and optimism. Fine molded mahogany period frame, which may be original, works perfectly to help the colors pop. Signed near the bottom "MEW". Frame size about 25 inches wide x 23 tall. Excellent condition with expected toning and a minor imperfection upper right. One of the finer examples of this early art form that one will find. HAPPY TO SHARE HIGH RES IMAGES.

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A RARE GEM: CHILD'S CHIPPENDALE CHEST.....SOLD

An eye-witness to American Revolution history. In a size AND condition that we will probably not find again! New England, likely Connecticut area, ca. 1780. Cherry primary wood with white pine secondary. Original batwing brasses, and red-pigmented original dry varnish surface. HIGH RES PHOTOS AVAILABLE. Not a miniature, rather made for a child standing about the same height as a candle stand. In period a luxury. Molded top above four thumbnail-molded graduated drawers supported by a notched, square-bracket base. Fully dovetailed case and drawers; deeply chamfered and hand-planed drawer bottoms. Each drawer retains original lock, the presence indicating that the clothing or textiles enclosed within were valuable. Very clean condition inside and out. Back has beautiful dark patina. One very minor repair to one drawer-lip corner. Case width just 24 inches (25 ½ at the base). 27 3/8 inches tall. 11 ½ deep (at the base). Given the small size this chest has the flexibility to be placed almost anywhere, and can function as a lighting stand or side-table. Provenance: Fine private Southern Collection.

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Choice and Rare PILGRIM CENTURY Carved Weaver's Tape Loom

Massachusetts, North Shore Boston, Essex-area, ca. 1680-1720. There are many tape looms that we see, but few have survived like this one. The rare opportunity to acquire a three-centuries old artifact from early Colonial America. WHITE OAK with rich chocolate-brown natural patina. Carved SUNBURST CREAST joined by tiny wooden pegs to the working slats; the base of the slats chip-carved. Pilgrim century furniture and utilitarian objects were typically rectilinear and made of American white oak, emulating the then preferred wood in colonists' English homeland. In the late 17th century, designs began to evolve to more fluid lines while abandoning white oak (which was in great demand for ship building) in favor of walnut, birch, maple, and other local woods that gave a lighter appearance. Tape looms were used by weavers who held the looms between their knees as they worked, producing thin strips of woven fabric called "tapes", plain or patterned, that had a multitude of uses from binding clothing to sacks. Given the time frame and location, this tape loom could have had association with the near at hand Salem Witch Trials in 1692-1693. About 25 inches tall x 11 wide x 1/2 thick. Remarkable original condition with just minor loss on the back. References: Historic New England, The Nina Fletcher Little Collection at Cogswell's Grant, Essex, Mass, accession # 1991.435; The Putnam Family (John Putnam being a witness to the Salem Witch Trials), Northeast Auctions, The Monahan Collection, August 2001 to Bill Samaha; and the Museum of Fine Arts (MFA), Boston, accession # 1977.636.

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Beautiful Colorful Folk Art Family Record with Vivid Graphics

Northeast America, New York State or Connecticut, ca. 1829. Watercolor and ink on wove paper. An exceptional example of multi-generational family documentation, possibly a "school-girl" work. Probably painted when Laura Roberts Foster (b. Feb. 22, 1808 in Patterson NY) and Joshua C Foster (b. Nov 11, 1805 in Southeast NY) were married on October 15, 1829. The towns of Patterson and Southeast (written on the record) are in New York State near Danbury, CT. A family record by the same hand came to market in the 1980's from Ridgefield, CT, just a few miles from Patterson/Southeast. What a remarkable way to document their wedding, with a neatly compartmentalized composition of masterful paint, pen, and compass work. Clearly articulated symbols of trees for births, hearts for marriage, and sandglass for death. Note the fine details like the tiny flowers within the half-round border at the top, flanked by large roses. Gilt frame is period and likely original. Frame size about 18 1/4 inches tall x 15 1/4 wide; sight size about 16 1/4 x 13 1/4. Retains crisp bright colors in superb condition. See "The Art of the Family" Genealogical Artifacts in New England, for reference. Enliven your home with color and authentic pieces. High res photos available.

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Tin Basket with Blown-GLASS Tulips

The basket ca. second-half 19th century, the tulips ca. 1920's-1930's. The basket saddle-shaped with folded-edge handle and basket lip in dark patina. Fine condition with minor internal rust at the seams; 12 inches in length. The blown glass tulips (seven total) have been a popular accent for period antiques for decades and much more scarce than stone or velvet fruit. Excellent condition ranging in length from 9 1/2 inches to 13 1/2.

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Portrait Miniature of a Young Woman by Jane Anthony Davis.....SALE PENDING

Probably Rhode Island or Connecticut, ca. 1830's. Watercolor on wove paper in a terrific figured-burl frame with corner-blocks. Characteristic Davis features include a black dress, full-face angled a bit to the right (not in profile), blue and white highlights, and mid-length. Note the tiny hands holding a book. Exceptionally puffy sleeves on the forearm fashionable in the early 1830's, with lace trim. Frame size about 7 5/8 inches x 7 1/8. Reference: See "Three New England Watercolor Painters" pp 42-55 for other portraits by Davis..

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WANTED!

A selection of past sales. LOOKING FOR MORE pieces with exceptional COLOR, FORM, SURFACE, and CONDITION!. Email me photos at earlypieces@aol.com Thank you..

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