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SISTER'S BOND. Antique Life-Size Double Portrait by Joseph Goodhue Chandler. 1848

Inscribed on the back: "Painted for Victoria A. and Virginia R. Wilder aged 6 years/by J.G. Chandler February 1848"..... Oil on canvas. The sisters portrayed wearing russet dresses and white pantaloons. Likely in the area of Hubbardston, Massachusetts. This portrait delightfully conveys the bond between the two sisters, embodied by their joined hands and shoulders forming a symbolic heart, in a manner that would be difficult to show as effectively even with the realism afforded by the then emerging availability of photography. And the color certainly could not have been matched by the monochromatic photographic images of the day. Note the sizeable house on the hill behind the girls, (likely their family home), the fishermen on the nearby pond, and the foreground flowers. Impactful scale! Sight size about 56 x 28 inches. Frame size about 66 tall x 39 wide. Paintings by Chandler are in many important antique and folk art collections, both private and institutional, the latter including the Shelburne Museum, the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Center, the New York State Historical Museum at Cooperstown, and the National Gallery of Art...... Provenance includes: Hirschl & Adler; Leigh Keno; pictured and discussed in the Highly Important Americana from the Stanley Paul Sax Collection, Sotheby's, January, 1998; prominent Midwest Collection.

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James and Lydia Russell HANNAFORD Marriage and Family Record

New England, ca November 18, 1793. Watercolor and ink on wove paper. Signed "Caroline Hill", likely the artist. The Hannaford name is well known in the northeast for a chain of grocery stores. This family record is believed to represent that family. Hope (the lady with anchor) is pictured at the right, with "mother and child" at the left, flanking a pillared arch with ornamental scrolls, eagles, and red curtains with blue tassels. James and Lydia, both born in 1773, are listed above their 13 children, born between 1794 and 1817. Fine condition retaining strong colors and expected toning. Early frame of about 16 1/3 x 13 1/2 inches. .

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Early Burl Lighting Tidy and Betty Lamp.....SOLD

Probably New England, ca. late 18th century. The tidy carved from what appears to be elm burl, with central waist, recessed to accommodate a betty lamp, with edge notched to project the spout. The inside retaining original salmon paint. The tidy and lamp show the same collection or museum red numbering, 79.48 A and B, indicating that they have been together since that and likely started together. The tidy stand just 5 1/4 inches tall without lamp. Super character, and an rare early example of the form. Provenance: private collection from Paul DeCoste. .

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Exceptional Polychrome Hollowcut Silhouette Pair by JAMES HOSLEY WHITCOMB

Probably New York State or New Hampshire, ca. 1830-1835. PRE-PHOTOGRAPHY MEMORIES. Watercolor, graphite, and ink on wove paper. Based on the distinctive bust-lines, the artist is attributed to the deaf-mute artist JAMES HOSLEY WHITCOMB, based on research published in the New Hampshire Historical Society magazine (1977) by Donna-Belle Gavin. James Holsey Whitcomb (1806-1849) born in Hancock, New Hampshire. This pair of silhouettes has it all! Note they are each "twice" hollow-cut, with the heads and bust-line areas cut and backed with black-silk, while the clothing is watercolor painted on the wove paper. The gentleman, identified as CHARLES BUROUGHS, is particularly beautifully decorated with a blue-gray coat (with buttons that stand proud), yellow vest, and blue-patterned cravat, with high white collar. The lady, LUCINDA BURROUGHS, also shows blue-gray with a splash of yellow. Based on a granny-note accompanying the piece, Charles was born in New York State in 1790, and Lucinda also in New York (Hoosick) in 1796. They were married and had 11 children. Subtle graphite embellishments are seen about their heads. Presented in a beautiful one-piece period frame, that may be original, with molded edges and central divider. Fine condition with minor toning. Frame size about 10 1/4 inches wide x 6 1/2 tall x 5/8 thick. See Skinner, the Lewis Scranton collection, 2016, for another pair by Whitcomb. Also see Silhouettes in America, 1790-1840, Blume Rifken, pp. 74-75. From a private Pennsylvania collection.

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Portrait of Daniel Yanior, Philadelphia Butcher's Guild, by James Herring

Pennsylvania, ca. 1824. Oil on wooden panel. Wonderful deep, rich, warm colors, executed in a manner similar to ship captain portraits. The sitter is Daniel Yanior, one of the five member "Butcher's Guild of Philadelphia", hence the cattle in the background. The Guild hired Herring in 1824 to paint portraits of each of its members. Confident attribution to James Herring (1794-1867) based on a very similar example, nearly identical for pose and background, signed by Herring and selling at Sotheby's, October 1991, lot 93. Herring is perhaps best known for creating the periodical "The National Portrait Gallery of Distinguished Americans" and "The Apollo Art Gallery". His painting style favored crisp lines and a bold color palette. Paintings by Herring are displayed in a number of museums, including the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Center, NY State Historical Society, National Portrait Gallery, etc. Research on Herring was published in the Magazine Antiques, January, 1978. Condition: A thin restored crack runs vertically from top to bottom of the board; barely discernable. The frame is contemporary. Frame size 27 inches wide x 32 3/4 tall; sight size 20 3/8 x 26 1/8..... .

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Deeply Carved Double-Sided Cookie Board

Dutch, ca. early 19th century. Wood appears to be beach. Crisply and deeply carved of a man and woman, most likely husband and wife at the time of their wedding. Rich color. A substantial piece, heavy in hand, about 19 inches tall x 6 ¾ wide x 1/1/8 thick. A very decorative example of early treen work. From a long time Connecticut collection..

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Beautiful 17th Century Candlestick of Remarkable Scale and Condition. Marked......SALE PENDING

Nuremberg, ca. 1650. Brass of superior quality and superb craftsmanship, both a hallmark of Nuremberg makers in this period, with an impressive size that dwarfs most others of this form. In two parts, the thin, finely turned broad bell base supporting an integral dished round mid-drip pan, fitted with a screw-threaded baluster-turned post and cylindrical candle cup which is capped by an downward sweeping bobeche. The base, drip-pan, and candle-cup decorated by incised lines. Maker's mark X on the drip pan edge. Condition is sensational without cracks, with just a very slight lean to the post, and a very small foundry patch (in the making) under the drip pan. Across-the-room presence at 8 1/2 inches tall with base diameter of a surprising 6 1/2. See Old Domestic Base-Metal Candlesticks, Michaelis. page 65, and Antique Brass Candlesticks, 1450-1750, Grove, pp. 24-25, for very similar examples. The most impressive example of this form I have seen.

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Bold, Bright, and Beautiful American Theorem

Probably New England, ca. 1830. Paint (oil) on cotton-velvet. Unusally impressive and dramatic, with rich, saturated colors featuring a woven basket on a green table, the basket overflowing with flowers and leaves. Note especially the stylized sun flower upper left, and the little blue bird at the top. The details keep coming, from the fine weave of the basket to the leaf tendrils to the shaded flower petals; and even an unopened rose bud. The art fills the space with a feeling of abundance and optimism. Fine molded mahogany period frame, which may be original, works perfectly to help the colors pop. Signed near the bottom "MEW". Frame size about 25 inches wide x 23 tall. Excellent condition with expected toning and a minor imperfection upper right. One of the finer examples of this early art form that one will find. HAPPY TO SHARE HIGH RES IMAGES.

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A RARE GEM: CHILD'S CHIPPENDALE CHEST.....SOLD

An eye-witness to American Revolution history. In a size AND condition that we will probably not find again! New England, likely Connecticut area, ca. 1780. Cherry primary wood with white pine secondary. Original batwing brasses, and red-pigmented original dry varnish surface. HIGH RES PHOTOS AVAILABLE. Not a miniature, rather made for a child standing about the same height as a candle stand. In period a luxury. Molded top above four thumbnail-molded graduated drawers supported by a notched, square-bracket base. Fully dovetailed case and drawers; deeply chamfered and hand-planed drawer bottoms. Each drawer retains original lock, the presence indicating that the clothing or textiles enclosed within were valuable. Very clean condition inside and out. Back has beautiful dark patina. One very minor repair to one drawer-lip corner. Case width just 24 inches (25 ½ at the base). 27 3/8 inches tall. 11 ½ deep (at the base). Given the small size this chest has the flexibility to be placed almost anywhere, and can function as a lighting stand or side-table. Provenance: Fine private Southern Collection.

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PILGRIM CENTURY Carved Weaver's Tape Loom

Massachusetts, North Shore Boston, Essex-area, ca. 1680-1710. The rare opportunity to acquire a three-centuries old artifact from early Colonial America made generations prior to the Revolution. WHITE OAK with rich original patina. Carved sunburst crest joined by tiny wooden pegs to the working slats; the base of the slats chip-carved. Pilgrim century furniture and utilitarian objects were typically rectilinear and made of American white oak, emulating the then preferred wood in colonists' English homeland. In the late 17th century, designs began to evolve to more fluid lines while abandoning white oak (which was in great demand for ship building) in favor of walnut, birch, maple, and other local woods that gave a lighter appearance. Tape looms were used by weavers who held the looms between their knees as they worked, producing thin strips of woven fabric called "tapes", plain or patterned, that had a multitude of uses from binding clothing to sacks. Given the time frame and location, this tape loom could have had association with the near at hand Salem Witch Trials in 1692-1693. About 25 inches tall x 11 wide x 1/2 thick. Remarkable original condition with just minor loss on the back. References: Historic New England, The Nina Fletcher Little Collection at Cogswell's Grant, Essex, Mass, accession # 1991.435; The Putnam Family (John Putnam being a witness to the Salem Witch Trials), Northeast Auctions, The Monahan Collection, August 2001 to Bill Samaha; and the Museum of Fine Arts (MFA), Boston, accession # 1977.636.

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