Home  >  Antiques
Antiques
Stately, Ancient Brass Gothic Candlestick.....SALE PENDING

Northwest Europe, ca. 15th century. Imagine holding in your hands an object that has witnessed centuries of history and still appears much as it did during its initial period of use! This remarkable candlestick features 4-discoid knops on the column which is peened underneath to a stepped, broadly flaring skirt with incised lines of decoration supporting a pronounced deep well/drip pan centered by a stepped-conical cone. The socket has moldings for aesthetics and added strength, and horizontal aperature in the lower half to aid removal of candle stubs. Superb condition. About 9 5/8 inches tall x 4 1/2 diameter at base. Scholarly references include Koper and Brons, RIKS Musuem, Amsterdam; Lear Collection, Copper-Alloy Candlesticks A.D. 200-1700, Christopher Bangs; Old Domestic Base-Metal Candlesticks, Michaelis; and Antique Brass Candlesticks, 1450-1750, Grove.

More Information
Full Length Profile Portrait of Little 4-Year Old Boy John Smith and his Wheelbarrow. JH Davis.

New England. Likely Maine or New Hampshire. Dated 1837. Confidently attributed to Joseph H. Davis, active 1832-1837. Of exceptional appeal and character. Watercolor, pencil, and probably gum arabic (to provide detail to the black clothing) on woven paper. The inclusion of the wheelbarrow is charming and is probably unique to surviving Davis' works. John wears a black coat with brass buttons over trousers, with frilly collar. Note the tiny feet. Inscription across the base reads: "John H. Smith. Aged 4 Feb 12th, 1838. Painted December 1837". Excellent condition with expected paper toning. Overall frame size about 7 ¾ inches x 6 3/8. Provenance: Prominent Midwestern Collection.

More Information
SEVEN-COLOR Folk Art Paint Decorated Parcheesi Gameboard.....SOLD

Northeast America, 19th century (not one of the numerous 20th century boards). Original paint and well-patinated surface on a thick pine board. Simple, direct, crisp, unpretentious, authentic. The snappy stars have varying orientations which promotes movement. Can pick up colors in virtually any room with strong color contrast created by pigments of blue, green, yellow, red, brown with black lining and white fields. Colors really pop when well lit, particularly under art light. Never mounted for hanging, so has the flexibility of being placed in whatever orientation fits a space. Appealing size of about 15 3/4 x 16 inches, and a delightfully thick 7/8 inch (feels substantial in hand) . Excellent condition with a few scratches and very slight bow to the patinated back. .

More Information
Early Graphic Southern Still Life

From a private Virginia collection and believed to have been painted there, ca. 1790-1820. Oil on Southern-Yellow Pine wooden panel, the back with with deep edge chamfering. Exhibiting a delicacy and vertical “lift” associated with furniture and decorative arts of this period (transitioning from Chippendale to slender Hepplewhite). Wispy flowers in white and robin’s-egg-blue highlight the composition which includes leafy-green tendrils emanating from an electric-blue vase to accentuate the sense of verticality. The charcoal background is unusual and contributes to a feel that is graphic yet also “quiet”. Unobtrusive paint loss as shown due to expansion and contraction of the wooden panel, long ago professionally stabilized. Almost certainly the original painted frame, frame size about 20 inches tall x 14 3/4 wide. .

More Information
Vibrant, Graphic Paint Store Trade Sign.....SOLD

Northeast America, ca. 19th century. Vivid and fun and fresh. Unconventional form. Original paint and over-varnish on hardwood in the form of three graduated, stacked paint-barrels with highly-stylized black lettering, with shadowing, on background colors of green, mustard, and blue, each wrapped with silver-cream bands and red trim. The colors wrap around the sides. The sign is double-sided, yet the back is more worn. A bracket on the top enables it to be easily hung. Its vertical format allows it to be positioned on a narrow wall. Included with the sign is its original pine shipping crate, bearing the stencil FROM/JOHN LUCAS & CO/PHILA, NEW YORK, CHICAGO…..The back story of John Lucas is very appealing. Originally a paint maker from England, he established his paint company in Gibbsboro, NJ in 1842 where he pioneered new ways to make paints. In the late 19th century he patented the first ready-to-use paint products, especially for colorful Victorian houses, and created new pigment colors that were also much more environmentally safe. His social conscience and financial success led him to being a noted Philanthropist, building Gibbsboro into a dynamic and thriving village. Superb structural condition with minor paint losses and abrasions. Maximum dimensions about 49 inches tall x 17 1/4 wide. Provenance: Prominent Midwest collection..

More Information
Handsome “High Country” Painted Wallbox with Tabbed-Lollipop.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca. late 18th century. Pine, basswood, and perhaps poplar, the case joined by T-head nails, having a lollipop-topped backboard (with extending tab) over a deep well and drawer below. The lollipop form is believed to descend from the reductive form of the sunflower. The appealing form is elevated further by beautiful, highly crazed working-period 19th century warm-red paint and over-varnish covering much of the first 18th century thin black. The well sides and front are carved into a pleasing shape (the lower notch perhaps for resting a clay pipe) the tooling of the carver still well evident. The drawer is stoutly made, dovetailed and nailed, retaining the original turned-wood pull. Backboard and underside have strong patina. A well-made box, sturdily constructed. About 19 inches tall x 6 wide x 5 deep (not including the pull). Likely a pipe box, with the drawer for tinder. May be hung, or rests on a chest or shelf. Until recently from a private collection.

More Information
Charming Early Naïve Evocative Painting.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca. 1820-1840. Oil on thick pine panel, the paint and panel dry in surface. Polychrome rendered during a period in which any paint had to be hand-made for self use, indicating that these vignettes had to each be significant to the artist. The upper right shows a cool stylized cat above a decorative urn, the bottom perhaps the artist’s horse next to what could be a self-portrait, with the painting centered by a oversized flower. Housed in a "killer" mustard-painted frame with superb complementary color and surface to the painting. Frame size about 15 inches x 12. Condition is terrific. The hanging hole near the bottom was probably present prior to the painting. Provenance: Found in the 1980’s by Robert Thayer in Connecticut.

More Information
Sophisticated Tombstone-Shape Meetinghouse Message Box (possibly Watch Hutch) with Notable Provenance.....SOLD

New England, ca. last quarter 18th century. White pine in original very dry black paint (some evidence indicating it originally may having been green, oxidizing to the darker color). Involved design with exceptional execution, like a little piece of furniture by a skilled maker. Joinery by a mix of rosehead and unheaded cut nails. Although generically this form is assigned use as a watch hutch, I have seen another box with large glass door of the same period that was known to have been used to post messages in an 18th century New England meeting house. Retains a carved peg on the back wall to for note or watch. Remarkable condition retaining original glass, worn-turn buckle, brass hinges, and uncompromised construction. Back board split at the hole for the peg, and what appears to be a bit of random red paint on the left side stile. Hangs from a hole in the backboard that does not penetrate to the front. Other than the split in the backboard, essentially pristine. Impressive size of about 15 3/4 inches tall x 9 wide x 1 3/4 deep. New England "Puritan simplicity" with "Shaker-like" craftsman’s mastery. Provence: Lillian Blankley Cogan, Farmington, CT; Private Ohio Collection; Steve Powers; Private Northeast Collection. HAPPY TO EMAIL HIGH RES PHOTOS.

More Information
Rare Tea Caddy with Hudson-River School Landscape Painted Panels

Northeast America, ca. 1840’s. Featuring six original miniature oil-painted panels, including on the inner-removable vapor lid, decorating a hexagonal, zinc-lined, stop-hinged tea caddy. Inscription under the base (on a label on top of marbleized paper) indicates it was given as a wedding present to Elizabeth Latham (Cole) from her brother Lester Latham in 1848. The panels perhaps are remembrances of places visited or intended. Panel locations include: Front--Desert rock lighthouse (Maine). Back --Near Anthony's Nose (mountain by the Bear Mountain Bridge, it is on the east side with Bear Mountain on the opposite shore). Top---Bridge at Norvine (now a state park in north western New Jersey near Greenwood Lake). Inside lid--the Narrows (entrance to NY harbor). Diminutive size at 5 7/8 inches long x 4 1/2 deep x 3 1/2 tall. Terrific condition with minor expected wear. Interior includes family papers which also prop up the interior lid which is properly shrunk over time. Provenance: long time private New England collection; Israel Sack. Pictured in “Opportunities in American Antiques' Israel Sack Inc, 1997, pg. 51, P-6674.). HAPPY TO SHARE HI RESOLUTION PHOTOS.

More Information
Folk Art Carved Walking Stick. Powerful yet Quiet Spirit.....SOLD

Eastern United States, found in Western New York State, yet possibly Southern, ca. 19th century. Appears to be hickory, the head deeply carved from the natural knot or burl at the top of the stick following the organic shape of the wood. A remarkably sensitive image, naïvely rendered yet with careful consideration, perhaps a self-portrait, of an African American man with slightly downcast posture, which to my eye communicates strength yet sadness. The character of the carving amplified by the original black paint that is worn through on the high spots, burnished smoothly from frequent handling, revealing the warm underlying wood color. Overall length about 34 1/2 inches. See page 73: American Vernacular, for a similar yet less powerful example. Also see American Folk Art Canes, Personal Sculpture, George Meyer, with an insightful discussion of African American walking sticks and canes. This historic and inspiring piece grabbed me the moment I first saw it.

More Information