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SISTER'S BOND. Antique Life-Size Double Portrait by Joseph Goodhue Chandler. 1848

Inscribed on the back: "Painted for Victoria A. and Virginia R. Wilder aged 6 years/by J.G. Chandler February 1848"..... Oil on canvas. The sisters portrayed wearing russet dresses and white pantaloons. Likely in the area of Hubbardston, Massachusetts. This portrait delightfully conveys the bond between the two sisters, embodied by their joined hands and shoulders forming a symbolic heart, in a manner that would be difficult to show as effectively even with the realism afforded by the then emerging availability of photography. And the color certainly could not have been matched by the monochromatic photographic images of the day. Note the sizeable house on the hill behind the girls, (likely their family home), the fishermen on the nearby pond, and the foreground flowers. Impactful scale! Sight size about 56 x 28 inches. Frame size about 66 tall x 39 wide. Paintings by Chandler are in many important antique and folk art collections, both private and institutional, the latter including the Shelburne Museum, the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Center, the New York State Historical Museum at Cooperstown, and the National Gallery of Art...... Provenance includes: Hirschl & Adler; Leigh Keno; pictured and discussed in the Highly Important Americana from the Stanley Paul Sax Collection, Sotheby's, January, 1998; prominent Midwest Collection.

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Profusely Carved and Chip-Decorated Small Sliding Lid Box

Probably New England or Pennsylvania, ca. 1780-1820. Prominently features the FYLFOT as one of the carved pictorial elements. Although we don't know exactly what the fylfot symbolized, we know that it was important, beyond just decorative, and has been seen in both secular and sacred contexts. Research suggests it may represent the sun, energy, rebirth, and/or renewal. The fylfot is often seen on early New England and Pennsylvania decorative arts, and is frequently found on the relief-carved rosettes terminating the split-pediments of 18th century Connecticut furniture. The box also features stylized conjoined hearts, implying being made for a special occasion such as a wedding or anniversary. Carved from a single block (not joined) of dense hardwood. Surprisingly heavy in hand. Retains original thin black paint, with traces of crackled over-varnish within some of the pictorial elements, perhaps used to highlight them. Indistinctly inscribed underneath the lid "This belonged to...given...." The time and effort and precision shown in the carving suggests the box having been important to the maker. Just 9 inches long including the over-extending thumb piece x 3 wide x 2 3/4 tall. Exceptional condition and may be laid flat or stand on end. Favorable price, email me.

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Massive Bowl with Rich Blue Color

New England, ca. early 19th century. Appears to be maple. Original paint history of blues over red. Much character in surface from long-time period use. Desirable shrinkage well out of round without cracking (a couple of inconsequential checks at the rim, mentioned for completeness). Excellent condition yet with old lift of a knot as shown. Maximum diameter about 24 inches, height about 9 ¾. A standout amongst painted bowls.

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Fine Pair Pewter (Britannia) Whale Oil Lamps.....SALE PENDING

Made by the Taunton Britannia Manufacturing Company, Taunton, MA, ca. 1830-1834. Acorn fonts surmounting baluster-turned columns supported by round bases. The underside of each base intaglio stamped 'T.B.M.CO' and '9'. The Taunton Britannia company was in business by that name from just 1830 till 1834. About 9 inches tall, plus the short double-burners which were used for whale oil (later burners for camphene oil were much longer to keep the flame further away from the fuel). Superb condition..

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Extremely Rare TINY BRASS Taper Chamberstick.....SALE PENDING

Probably Northwest Europe, from Holland to Germany to England, ca. 17th century. Although it has the appearance of iron, this exceedingly rare piece is worked from brass, retaining a remarkably dark unpolished patina. The nozzle with ejection slit is double-clenched underneath, and is centered by a hand-worked 7-point star against a textured ground with little circles between the start points. The sides of pan are out swept. The pierced handle, joined to the pan via a "rosehead" peen, features punched circle decoration. Diameter of the pan just 2 inches. Would have been used in period to provide light as needed at night in the bed chamber, and/or to provide wax for sealing written papers. That it has survived is just crazy. Private collection, purchased over 30 years ago from Michael Dunn.

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A RARE GEM: CHILD'S CHIPPENDALE CHEST.....SOLD

An eye-witness to American Revolution history. In a size AND condition that we will probably not find again! New England, likely Connecticut area, ca. 1780. Cherry primary wood with white pine secondary. Original batwing brasses, and red-pigmented original dry varnish surface. HIGH RES PHOTOS AVAILABLE. Not a miniature, rather made for a child standing about the same height as a candle stand. In period a luxury. Molded top above four thumbnail-molded graduated drawers supported by a notched, square-bracket base. Fully dovetailed case and drawers; deeply chamfered and hand-planed drawer bottoms. Each drawer retains original lock, the presence indicating that the clothing or textiles enclosed within were valuable. Very clean condition inside and out. Back has beautiful dark patina. One very minor repair to one drawer-lip corner. Case width just 24 inches (25 ½ at the base). 27 3/8 inches tall. 11 ½ deep (at the base). Given the small size this chest has the flexibility to be placed almost anywhere, and can function as a lighting stand or side-table. Provenance: Fine private Southern Collection.

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WINDS FROM THE SEA. EXCEPTIONAL Authentic Early Fish Weathervane.

Likely the J. W. Fiske Company, New York City, ca. 1870. Form. Surface. Size. .....Copper, with a complex weathered surface that has taken on a beautiful verdigris color while retaining a good amount of gilding and sizing. As weathervanes were of critical importance for centuries to foretell changes in weather, they also become an important American sculptural art form. The best examples, like this scarce full-bodied fish, have appealing sculptural design AND retain an authentic surface that reflects the environmental conditions that led to the aesthetic. Note the balance of top and bottom fins, the graceful flowing lines of the body into the flared and corrugated tail, the repousse eyes, and that dramatic mouth, rimmed with copper molding, that is downswept against the flat bottom jaw. The presence is strong and confident. About 31 1/2 inches long x 13 tall (including stand) x 5 deep. Superb condition; just a few filled or open bullet holes and minor imperfections. See: The Art of the Weathervane, Steve Miller, page 79 for a similar example.

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Choice and Rare PILGRIM CENTURY Carved Weaver's Tape Loom.....SALE PENDING

Massachusetts, North Shore Boston, Essex-area, ca. 1680-1720. There are many tape looms that we see, but few have survived like this one. The rare opportunity to acquire a three-centuries old artifact from early Colonial America. WHITE OAK with rich chocolate-brown natural patina. Carved SUNBURST CREAST joined by tiny wooden pegs to the working slats; the base of the slats chip-carved. Pilgrim century furniture and utilitarian objects were typically rectilinear and made of American white oak, emulating the then preferred wood in colonists' English homeland. In the late 17th century, designs began to evolve to more fluid lines while abandoning white oak (which was in great demand for ship building) in favor of walnut, birch, maple, and other local woods that gave a lighter appearance. Tape looms were used by weavers who held the looms between their knees as they worked, producing thin strips of woven fabric called "tapes", plain or patterned, that had a multitude of uses from binding clothing to sacks. Given the time frame and location, this tape loom could have had association with the near at hand Salem Witch Trials in 1692-1693. About 25 inches tall x 11 wide x 1/2 thick. Remarkable original condition with just minor loss on the back. References: Historic New England, The Nina Fletcher Little Collection at Cogswell's Grant, Essex, Mass, accession # 1991.435; The Putnam Family (John Putnam being a witness to the Salem Witch Trials), Northeast Auctions, The Monahan Collection, August 2001 to Bill Samaha; and the Museum of Fine Arts (MFA), Boston, accession # 1977.636.

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Scarce MINIATURE Theorem

New England, ca. 1820-1840. Watercolor and ink on paper, in what appears to be the original red painted frame. Featuring a carefully painted basket with side handles overflowing with fruit, including blue grapes. Dot and dash border at the paper edges. Original condition with expected paper toning. The back has a possibly period inscription in pencil at the bottom which reads: "Anna Van Fleet was born November 13, 1803". Above it is a later inscription which reads "This picture was given to Anna Van Fleet (Afterwards Mrs. Wm. H. Hoffman) by her niece Betsey E_____?. Jun 21, 1947." The frame about 5 ¼ inches square..

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OUTSTANDING Folk Portrait of a Sidewinder Paddlesteamer Sailing Ship

American, ca. 1840-1860. Oil on canvas. Steam-powered sidewinder sailing ships first came into service about 1840. Initially, these ships were only marginally faster than wind-powered clipper sailing-ships and were prone to mechanical failure and fuel shortage. As such, these early paddlewheeler's were typically fitted with a full complement of masts, rigging, and sails due to the captain's mistrust of the new steam technology......By about 1860, technology improved to the point that they were reliable enough (and now significantly faster than sailing-ships) such that the sailing apparatus, including spare sails, rope, and all things needed to sail were eliminated. A benefit of eliminating sails and support supplies was that there was now more space for passengers and the storage of materials for their comfort and other amenities......This painting is a superb depiction of one of these early hybrid sailing and sidewinder ships. Note the beautiful eagle figurehead (sailors "believed" that the sharp eyes of the eagle would be constantly on the lookout for perilous shoals), and the wonderful anchor attached to the side. A large American flag alerts of the captain's pride. The ship cuts cleanly through wind-swept seas. The warm tone of the sky is well balanced by the aqua-green of the swirling waters, with dashes of color from flags, figurehead, and anchor......Terrific condition, with very minor in-painting. Chamfered black painted frame appeaers original (with a bit of repair on the lower edge). Overall frame size is 35.75 x 25.25 inches. Sight size is 29.25 x 19 inches.....Provenance: Private collection, and previously Stephen-Douglas; Robert Thayer.

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