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Sophisticated Tombstone-Shape Meetinghouse Message Box (possibly Watch Hutch) with Notable Provenance.....SOLD

New England, ca. last quarter 18th century. White pine in original very dry black paint (some evidence indicating it originally may having been green, oxidizing to the darker color). Involved design with exceptional execution, like a little piece of furniture by a skilled maker. Joinery by a mix of rosehead and unheaded cut nails. Although generically this form is assigned use as a watch hutch, I have seen another box with large glass door of the same period that was known to have been used to post messages in an 18th century New England meeting house. Retains a carved peg on the back wall to for note or watch. Remarkable condition retaining original glass, worn-turn buckle, brass hinges, and uncompromised construction. Back board split at the hole for the peg, and what appears to be a bit of random red paint on the left side stile. Hangs from a hole in the backboard that does not penetrate to the front. Other than the split in the backboard, essentially pristine. Impressive size of about 15 3/4 inches tall x 9 wide x 1 3/4 deep. New England "Puritan simplicity" with "Shaker-like" craftsman’s mastery. Provence: Lillian Blankley Cogan, Farmington, CT; Private Ohio Collection; Steve Powers; Private Northeast Collection. HAPPY TO EMAIL HIGH RES PHOTOS.

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Rare Tea Caddy with Hudson-River School Landscape Painted Panels

Northeast America, ca. 1840’s. Featuring six original miniature oil-painted panels, including on the inner-removable vapor lid, decorating a hexagonal, zinc-lined, stop-hinged tea caddy. Inscription under the base (on a label on top of marbleized paper) indicates it was given as a wedding present to Elizabeth Latham (Cole) from her brother Lester Latham in 1848. The panels perhaps are remembrances of places visited or intended. Panel locations include: Front--Desert rock lighthouse (Maine). Back --Near Anthony's Nose (mountain by the Bear Mountain Bridge, it is on the east side with Bear Mountain on the opposite shore). Top---Bridge at Norvine (now a state park in north western New Jersey near Greenwood Lake). Inside lid--the Narrows (entrance to NY harbor). Diminutive size at 5 7/8 inches long x 4 1/2 deep x 3 1/2 tall. Terrific condition with minor expected wear. Interior includes family papers which also prop up the interior lid which is properly shrunk over time. Provenance: long time private New England collection; Israel Sack. Pictured in “Opportunities in American Antiques' Israel Sack Inc, 1997, pg. 51, P-6674.). HAPPY TO SHARE HI RESOLUTION PHOTOS.

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Folk Art Carved Walking Stick. Powerful yet Quiet Spirit.....SOLD

Eastern United States, found in Western New York State, yet possibly Southern, ca. 19th century. Appears to be hickory, the head deeply carved from the natural knot or burl at the top of the stick following the organic shape of the wood. A remarkably sensitive image, naïvely rendered yet with careful consideration, perhaps a self-portrait, of an African American man with slightly downcast posture, which to my eye communicates strength yet sadness. The character of the carving amplified by the original black paint that is worn through on the high spots, burnished smoothly from frequent handling, revealing the warm underlying wood color. Overall length about 34 1/2 inches. See page 73: American Vernacular, for a similar yet less powerful example. Also see American Folk Art Canes, Personal Sculpture, George Meyer, with an insightful discussion of African American walking sticks and canes. This historic and inspiring piece grabbed me the moment I first saw it.

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Rare MINIATURE Painted MIRROR CLOCK.....SOLD

New Hampshire, dated July 7, 1842. Remains in a remarkable state of preservation with original clock, mirror glass, and varnish over black paint and bronze-powder stenciling on half-round columns with corner blocks. Walnut or mahogany case. Brass movement. Rare miniature size of just 7 inches tall! See “The American Clock”, Distin and Bishop, for images of several NH mirror clocks.

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Remarkable Carved and Painted Early Frame.....SOLD

Centre County, Pennsylvania, ca. 1840. Likely poplar, with original dry red paint. Remarkable carving! The corner pinwheels stand so tall from the surface that they remind one of frosting on a cupcake. Each individual "herring-bone-like" channel is skillfully and carefully carved. Lapped-corner joints secured from behind by wooden pins. The painted surface is red, tending towards salmon. The thin over-varnish is crackled; a sensational surface. Outside dimensions about 18 inches x 14 1/2. The view dimensions about 13 1/8 x 9 3/4. The inside rabbet (the maximum piece of art that it could take) is about 14 inches x 10 5/8. About 5/8 inches thick, and a full 1 1/2 inches thick at the corners including the pinwheel carvings. Superior condition, tight and robust in hand. Stand-alone as a work of art, or to present a top-shelf painting about the size of a Prior-Hamblin School portrait.

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Tin Schoolhouse Punishment Markers.....SALE PENDING

Northeast America, likely Pennsylvania, 19th century. Paint on tin. These tins tell the story of shaming unruly children in 19th century schooling. Imagine the unlucky boy or girl standing in a corner with one of these markers hanging from their neck (and perhaps a dunce cap on top). “Lyeing” may be a misspelling, or could be an early spelling of 'lying'. Both with rust and bends that add character. The wicked boy may have old paint-reinforcement to the lettering. Each tin about 4 inches x 6 (later twine hangers). .

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The JESTER and the WOODSMAN,Deeply Engraved Early Brass Tobacco Box.....SOLD

Dutch or English, ca. first half, 18th century. Signed and dated in wrigglework under lid “H.G.B 1746”. Deeply engraved brass with unusual subject of a court jester on one side, and a woodsman on the other. Engraved brass tobacco boxes were a means in this early period to demonstrate wealth. Excellent condition. About 4 5/8 inches long x 2 3/4 wide x 1 tall. 30+ years in private collection.

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"THE BRIDGE" BY THOMAS CHAMBERS

New York or New England, ca. mid-19th century. Oil on canvas. Thomas Chambers (1808-1869), described as America's "first modern", is well known for highly imaginative paintings characterized by areas of bright, flat color, large generalized forms, and sharp contrasts between light and dark areas, with playful, romantic exaggerations that reflected the "fancy" taste of his prosperous patrons in New York and New England. "The Bridge" is a tranquil, yet boldly colored painting, with color palette typical of Chambers' work, following a horse and rider trotting over a fanciful bridge spanning a calm river, the peacefulness of the scene accentuated by wading cattle and drifting sail boats. The composition leads the eye under the bridge to wonder what is unseen up the river. This painting is in excellent condition. Lined. The fine gilded frame appears to be the original, as is the stretcher. Frame size about 28 inches wide x 22 tall. A very hard to read saved label from the back of the canvas warrants further research. Museums with paintings by Chambers include: Addison Gallery of American Art, American Folk Art Museum, Dallas Museum of Art, Everson Museum of Art, Fenimore Art Museum, Flint Institute of Arts, Indiana University Art Museum, Mead Art Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, National Gallery of Art, New-York Historical Society, Rhode Island School of Design, Saint Louis Art Museum, Shelburne Museum, Smith College Museum of Art, The Brooklyn Museum of Art, and the Wadsworth Atheneum. See "Thomas Chambers: American Marine and Landscape Painter, 1808-1869", Foster, for extensive reference.

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RARE, VIVID Folk Art Street View.....SALE PENDING

19th century historical folk art street scenes, especially of this caliber, are scarce. They portray of the pride of the artist in their town. Shown is Albany (Market Street, from State Street to Maiden Lane.), New York. Oil on canvas. Painted by Anne Wrightson (born 1829), emulating in oil paints the watercolor/pencil drawing by James Eights created from his memory of living in Albany in 1805. The scene shows the cohesiveness of the neighborhood reflected in the continuity of architecture and brick-red paint, flanked by the mustard house on the left and a blue open structure on the right. The substantial square, paved with flat stones, shows smartly attired gentlemen sporting walking sticks, and a bonneted-lady in foreground carrying baskets under each arm. More structures can be seen in the distance, one appearing to have a large statue or weathervane surmounting a high cupola. The buildings are rendered with extensive detailing, including clapboards, window panes, steps and rails, and cellar doors. Miss Wrightson was a graduate of the Albany female academy and Lowell Institute. With her sister Harriet, she led a private school for girls on Maiden Lane and Chapel Street, near the location of this painting. The drawings by James Eights that inspired this painting are pictured in the Magazine Antiques, May, 1948. Presented in a walnut frame with gilt liner of the period of about 21 inches x 14; sight size 16 1/2 x 9 1/2. Condition is exceptional, with no restoration.

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