Small Superb Painted Splint Basket
.....SALE PENDING

Probably New England, ca. mid-19th century. Woodsplint fully covered with original very dry, complex, charcoal black paint, with perhaps a hint of green. Fixed handle. Upkick base. Excellent condition with a couple of very minor irregularities. Just 5 ¼ inches tall plus another 4 inches for the handle x 7 wide. Soulful character. Form, size, surface, condition, character.

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The DUEL. Fascinating
Folk Art MINIATURE.

Probably New England, possibly Mid-Atlantic or Southern, ca. 1830’s. Watercolor and ink on paper. A most unusual and intriguing image, with apparently husband and wife dueling with PISTOLS! She in fashionable full length blue-striped dress with stylized puffy sleeves, he in formal black. Taken in front of a upscale building or home with tall arched window framed by an arbor with extensive grape vines. Signed on the back of the paper “Mary A. Ingersole”. Artist? The image has rubs and small tears yet remains in highly saturated unfaded condition. In a period frame, frame size about 6 3/8 inches tall x 5 ½ wide. A most engaging image and subject, and a fun gift for those who appreciate the rarity and the symbolism.  

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Beautiful Colorful Folk Art Family Record
with Vivid Graphics

Northeast America, New York State or Connecticut, ca. 1829. Watercolor and ink on wove paper. An exceptional example of multi-generational family documentation, possibly a "school-girl" work. Probably painted when Laura Roberts Foster (b. Feb. 22, 1808 in Patterson NY) and Joshua C Foster (b. Nov 11, 1805 in Southeast NY) were married on October 15, 1829. The towns of Patterson and Southeast (written on the record) are in New York State near Danbury, CT. A family record by the same hand came to market in the 1980's from Ridgefield, CT, just a few miles from Patterson/Southeast. What a remarkable way to document their wedding, with a neatly compartmentalized composition of masterful paint, pen, and compass work. Clearly articulated symbols of trees for births, hearts for marriage, and sandglass for death. Note the fine details like the tiny flowers within the half-round border at the top, flanked by large roses. Gilt frame is period and likely original. Frame size about 18 1/4 inches tall x 15 1/4 wide; sight size about 16 1/4 x 13 1/4. Retains crisp bright colors in superb condition. See "The Art of the Family" Genealogical Artifacts in New England, for reference. Enliven your home with color and authentic pieces. High res photos available...

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NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORICAL ART: MASTERPIECE CARVED WALKING STICK.....SOLD

Eastern Woodlands, probably Great Lakes, ca. 1870, perhaps earlier. My enthusiasm for this elegantly carved horse is UNBRIDLED. Carved by a gifted Native American artist, chances are to honor his favorite horse. It is so unique that I remembered it instantly from years ago when offered by noted folk art dealer Marna Anderson. The graceful, stylized head appears to be from maple, with a gorgeous worn black stain. Retaining the original amber glass-bead eyes. The carving joined to the shaft at the position of a metal ring. A hole just below the ring held decorative attachments, like feathers. The shaft retains a reddish stain and the nubs from branches which add unexpected interest and character. The last few inches protected with a metal ferrule. The whole in superb rich patina. About 37 inches long. Comes with the floor stand as shown, but may also be wall hung. Thrilling that it has survived and in such amazing condition, this Native American wooden sculpture will bring joy each time it is seen. See Horse Imagery in Native American Art, within the book GREAT LAKES INDIAN ART, David Penny, that details the critical importance of horses to the Native American. Provenance includes Marna Anderson, Steve Powers, distinguished collector Peter Brams, Harris Diamant. and a private South Dakota collection.

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Paint Decorated
Swing Handle Box
.....SOLD

Probably Northeast, possibly Hingham, ca. 1840. Original yellow paint with black foliate and stripe decoration on what appears to be maple sidewall with pine top and bottom. The top further decorated with the signature "J.H. Wigg". The form is very unusual, I don't recall having had or seen another like it. The handle joined to the box via wooden pegs, the pegs secured inside with cut nails. Very finely made, excellent structural condition. Diameter about 7 1/4 inches, height 4 3/4 not including handle. Provenance: Private NH collection from Olde Hope; pictured on page 37, The Olde Hope Collection, A Catalogue of American Antiques, Summer, 2008.

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Important. Referencing VIRGINIA. Exceedingly Rare
PRE-REVOLUTION Tobacco Box
.....SOLD

Probably Birmingham, England, ca. 1735 to 1765. Surviving objects directly related to the trade of Virginia tobacco, of this early date prior to the American Revolution, are seldom found. Possibly made for an English merchant ship captain (sometimes known as a 'Master') for his prized imported Virginia tobacco (Virginia Good), yet it can not be ruled out that it could have been owned by one living in the colonies. The engraving: "Virginia good within I have, Yet am not free to evry Knave. My Master only I Supply, Let Begging fellows go & buy" has been found on two other boxes, one also in steel in the celebrated Monahan Pilgrim-century collection (Northeast, August 4, 2001), the other in brass, dated 1716, in the Deyerle important Americana collection (Sotheby's January 1, 1995). The back is pierced with holes forming a Celtic Knot, believed to symbolize a sailor's strength, friendship or affection. See IRON AT WINTERTHUR, Fennimore, figures 163-168, for similar engraved steel tobacco boxes of this period, although none show this rare historic expression. Excellent condition, about 4 3/8 inches long when the draw box is closed..ibe your product or give more information.

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Exceedingly Rare. Miniature Leather Firebucket. With Receipt from Lillian Cogan
.....SALE PENDING

Probably Newburyport, MA, ca. 18th century. Made in the manner of early leather drinking vessels and full-size firebuckets, this tiny piece (just 4 ½ inches tall not including the handle) is sewn from very thick leather and would surely hold water. Traces of paint with "NO 1" suggests that more than one were made, the purpose of which can only be speculated. Retains the original strap-leather handle with pressed decoration. Delightfully retains the sale of purchase from Lillian Blankley Cogan decades ago in Farmington, CT. An Americana rarity.

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Child's Country Ladderback
High Chair.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca 1800. Appears to be original natural surface on maple, with splint-ash seat. Turned finials with three arched slats; double box stretcher on base. The form and posture is enhanced by canting inward bottom to top and front to back. The frame is excellent condition, the seat with losses as shown. About 37 inches tall. Provenance: Peter Eaton; New England collection.

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